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View Full Version : What's a "gouge"?


35Whiskey
06-11-2007, 08:55 AM
I've seen this term used around here since I joined up. Whazzat?


mike734
06-11-2007, 08:59 AM
I've seen this term used around here since I joined up. Whazzat?
An older, "popular" flight attendant. :D

No. actually it is another name for "required info." It's the stuff you need to know. If you know the gouge for an interview, you know the questions and other stuff they are going to ask. I think it comes from the military.

Slice
06-11-2007, 09:03 AM
"Live by the gouge, die by the gouge." A popular saying. It means if you rely solely on it(as opposed to studying on your own, you better hope it's correct.


ABK MAN
06-11-2007, 12:59 PM
Is it moral to use a "gouge?" Before you interview, do you sign something affiriming that you did not seek inside or priveleged information regarding this interview. After you interview, do you sign anything that says you will not release what occured on the interview?

Split S
06-11-2007, 02:04 PM
If you ain't cheatin' you ain't tryin'

Rubbin's Racin'!!

-SS

the King
06-11-2007, 02:12 PM
All the majors know gouges exist. Some even check them to see what they say. If you dish out a canned answer for every one of your questions, you're probably likely to get something they don't normally ask. Just to make sure you did prepare. Gouges are a part of the process, but they shouldn't be the only thing you look at.

Roll Inverted and Pull
06-11-2007, 02:15 PM
"gouge" was origoinally a Navy term. It origionally meant "the answers to a test". In the past 30 or so years it has morphed into meaning "important information to help you". If, during an interview, anyone asked if you have been coached or gouged...deny, deny, deny.

blastoff
06-11-2007, 06:13 PM
"gouge" was origoinally a Navy term. It origionally meant "the answers to a test". In the past 30 or so years it has morphed into meaning "important information to help you". If, during an interview, anyone asked if you have been coached or gouged...deny, deny, deny.
Some airlines will encourage you to use gouge and pat you on the back. Gouge is used a lot in Air Force training, but you're still accountable to know what's in the source document...but gouge is key because it can point you in the right direction if you want to know what you should study in-depth.

Pilotpip
06-11-2007, 07:25 PM
Gouges are basically cheat sheets. Some from the company, some from others that have come before. Use caution, they are meant as a guide, not the word.

I think a good description would be Cliff Notes.

Speedbird172
06-12-2007, 02:20 AM
I think some places would also consider it to be CRM, after all it is an available resource! Like others have said though, it is not to be completely relied on.

Photon
06-12-2007, 04:44 AM
it's strange, when I see gouge I think of someone plucking another persons eyes out. Guess it's because I'm not a native English speaker :p

rickair7777
06-12-2007, 08:41 AM
it's strange, when I see gouge I think of someone plucking another persons eyes out. Guess it's because I'm not a native English speaker :p

That's the dictionary definition, yes.

I'm not sure how it came to mean "inside info" but it did start in the navy. Maybe it was a military acronym that was phonetically similar to "gouge"?

vagabond
06-12-2007, 08:54 AM
Photon, I am not a native English speaker myself and I didn't know what to make of it. I had some ideas (which got more fantastic over time), but they would not be appropriate for a family forum. :o

cbire880
06-12-2007, 10:17 AM
You'll find that most Navy originated terms make little sense to the uninitiated. Like gee-dunk...***.. I'll use it in a sentence: Do you want to go to the gee-dunk for a snack?

tomgoodman
06-12-2007, 10:50 AM
It may be an evolution of the noun "gauge": a standard of measurement or a device for measuring. As a UAW metalworker, I would set up a machine to cut desired lengths of steel by using a gauge. For cutting a pattern, the setup standard was called a template.

Garryowen
06-12-2007, 01:17 PM
from wiki:

In U.S. Navy jargon, gouge is the essential piece of information; the heart of the matter; or outstanding test-preparation material (such as an old test copy). A person who is tired of hearing all the extraneous information surrounding a problem might exclaim "Just give me the gouge!" Also used generally as a mark of excellence: "Did you see his sweet new car? It's totally gouge."

Originated at the U.S. Naval Academy and introduced from there into the wider navy, where it sees less frequent usage.

blastoff
06-12-2007, 01:45 PM
Widely used term on the Air Force side, at least among aircrew. I had always thought the word came from the important/most used info being "gouged" out of the massive volumes of source documents.

35Whiskey
06-14-2007, 07:46 AM
Thanks everybody. I get it now!

rickair7777
06-14-2007, 08:04 AM
from wiki:

In U.S. Navy jargon, gouge is the essential piece of information; the heart of the matter; or outstanding test-preparation material (such as an old test copy). A person who is tired of hearing all the extraneous information surrounding a problem might exclaim "Just give me the gouge!" Also used generally as a mark of excellence: "Did you see his sweet new car? It's totally gouge."

Originated at the U.S. Naval Academy and introduced from there into the wider navy, where it sees less frequent usage.

Yeah, it was definately a common boat-school term. I was kind of thinking it may have started there but didn't really know.