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View Full Version : Getting hired with a DUI/DWI


72944
09-07-2009, 07:58 PM
Does anyone know a person that has been hired at a regional or major with a DUI/DWI conviction in their past? Trying to give some advice to a buddy.

PM me if you do.

Thanks.


JetMonkey
09-07-2009, 08:05 PM
I only knew of one guy who I flight instructed with many years ago. He got hired by Champion Air and flew 727's with them for years, now their gone. He's now back to flight instructing, this time in the sim with Flight Safety.

HuronIP
09-07-2009, 08:07 PM
I know a guy at SWA that got one in college.


Justdoinmyjob
09-07-2009, 08:16 PM
I had a roommate while at ASA who got a DUI. He's now flying 767s at Delta. It can be done. You need to tell your buddy to NEVER get another one again. Having one will be viewed as an aberation, or temporary lapse of judgement. Having two or more shows a trend and is the kiss of death.

Zapata
09-07-2009, 08:21 PM
Does anyone know a person that has been hired at a regional or major with a DUI/DWI conviction in their past? Trying to give some advice to a buddy.

PM me if you do.

Thanks.

Tell your "buddy":rolleyes: that the best that he/she can do is to just be forthcoming and honest.

iaflyer
09-07-2009, 08:53 PM
Tell your "buddy":rolleyes: that the best that he/she can do is to just be forthcoming and honest.I agree - it's all about how you handle the issue and learned/grew from it. I got hired at Delta with a issue in my background - I made myself stand out in other ways, IOE instructor, graduate degree, etc.

How recent it was can make a difference, because it can be hard to show you've learned from a DUI a year ago, vs ten years ago.

Wasatch Phantom
09-08-2009, 04:45 AM
I agree - it's all about how you handle the issue and learned/grew from it. I got hired at Delta with a issue in my background - I made myself stand out in other ways, IOE instructor, graduate degree, etc.

I completely agree.

Almost everyone has some "skeleton in their closet". So if you can show an interviewer through post-"incident" performance and attitude that you turned it into a positive learning experience I think they'll overlook the issue.

If someone doesn't take responsibility but rather takes the position that it wasn't their fault [due to some excuse] that would be the kiss of death.

upndsky
09-08-2009, 06:57 AM
I also agree. I got hired at my regional and now Delta with a skeleton in my closet (not a DUI). In both cases, the incident became a positive focus of the interview. It made me stand out (in a good way) from the others.

Be humble, forthcoming and owe up to it. There is nothing wrong with admitting you made a mistake. But more importantly, be able to explain what you learned from it and what you're doing to mitigate a repeat.

The only hindrance will be the timing. If this is a very recent event, they may not touch your friend for a few years. They want to see that this is an aberration, not a possible trend. With so few hiring, this may not be an issue right now.

rickair7777
09-08-2009, 09:03 AM
In the past, you could get hired with a DUI. Factors that will help...

- If you were very young. If you were 30+, they will assume that you should have known better and will never learn.

- The more time that has passed since the incident, the better. Probably at least 5 years.

- Your honesty and attitude towards the incident.

- High pilot hiring demand. DUI's will not get hired when things are slow because they have so many equally qualified pilots who do not have DUI's. They prefer not to hire DUI's because even if you are a completely changed person, if you are ever involved in an accident the fact that you had a DUI will look bad in the media and during the lawsuit.

On a down note...the Colgan accident REALLY put the spotlight on pilot qualifications. I suspect that airlines will be loathe to hire anyone with any significant blackmarks on their record for a long time to come, maybe forever.

If you have a DUI and are considering investing in flight training, that is probably not a good idea. It might be much harder to overcome that history from here on out. Nobody can say for sure, but it's a lot of time and money to invest with that kind of uncertainty.

coyote
09-08-2009, 11:13 AM
I would suggest he give up; there are plenty of us who are perfect to fill any anticipated need. (Sic)

On a serious note, I think Rickair's thoughts are on target, with the additional comment that he/she is going to face an additional hurdle (not a small one either, in our current society dog fighting, child support and drunk driving have assumed biblical proportions) which was self created and I would suggest some serious introspection, perhaps even professional or clerical assistance. This would not only assist in a proper mind set professionally but guard against some of the bitterness that is prevalent on these forms when a pilots career perception does not match reality.

Best of luck-remember America loves a comeback especially when they think they are a part of it.

Lori Clark
09-17-2009, 01:00 PM
I'm sure there are many who have been hired with a DUI somewhere in their background.
It's very hard to give advice with the little information provided, there simply are too many variables. Rickair's post has good advice - I would add to that whether or not the person had a commercial license prior to the DUI. The commercial license is a pivotal point as it now makes the pilot a professional and as such is held to a higher standard.

Nobody knows what this industry is going to look like tomorrow, next week, next year or several years from now. Competition may be so fierce that an airline may have the luxury of not interviewing anyone with any skeletons. It's really anybody's guess as to what the hiring climate will look like down the pike. If an interview is extended then be prepared to discuss, in detail, what happened and what the learning experience was. Accountability and responsibility....

da_flyn_hawyn
09-19-2009, 06:30 PM
I had an instructor that had a DUI and when I was preparing for the CFI checkride he was that man to ask about questions. He had over 3,000 hours flying twins, turbines, and singles, was also the assistant chief pilot but could never get a job at the time. He finally got a job years later with mesa. Hooray for him??????????

rickair7777
09-19-2009, 08:20 PM
I had an instructor that had a DUI and when I was preparing for the CFI checkride he was that man to ask about questions. He had over 3,000 hours flying twins, turbines, and singles, was also the assistant chief pilot but could never get a job at the time. He finally got a job years later with mesa. Hooray for him??????????

Mesa has a reputation for that. As long as they are still in business, you might have a place to go.

SkyHigh
09-20-2009, 07:18 AM
Mesa has a reputation for that. As long as they are still in business, you might have a place to go.

Fire bomber and bush flying companies like to hire people with DUI's as well. They know that if they hire pilots with DUI's they have a captive work force.

Skyhigh

navigatro
09-20-2009, 03:27 PM
If you show up for the interview drunk, you have a better chance at getting hired, since that will show them that you can handle your liquor.

atpwannabe
09-20-2009, 08:23 PM
You know this subject seems to be coming up more often now than before. Although I can't answer the OP question in terms of being hired by a regional or a major airline, I will offer you some advice from personal experience.

If the DUI conviction occured prior to them getting their medical, then obviously they have been cleared by the Office of Aerospace Medicine in Washington DC or OKC to fly airplanes. Just as others have stated, be honest and transparent about the situation(s) when questioned about it.

Tell your buddy to set themselves apart from the rest of the applicants/class. Once the Feds give you the green light, everything else is about timing.


All the best to your friend.



atp