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zyttocs
11-21-2010, 07:20 PM
Hey guys I need real numbers for the King Air B200 and 300...

B200 @ FL 240
and
300 @ FL 280

TAS?

Also....

I know the regs but can someone clarify if a BE200 pilot can log SIC in a BE300

Thanks....


satpak77
11-21-2010, 10:49 PM
The B-350 which I fly, real-world is 270 TAS at mid-20's to upper 20's flight levels. 280 TAS? Nah dont plan on it.

It is single pilot airplane, unless you know something I don't, I can't see where one can log "SIC" in it...

BoilerUP
11-22-2010, 03:37 AM
B200 POH Performance
Max Cruise Power/1800rpm @ ISA, 12,000lb
FL240: 287kt @ 658pph
FL280: 281kt @ 564pph

Max Range Power/1700rpm @ ISA, 12,000lb
FL240: 223kt @ 518pph
FL280: 230kt @ 404pph


Formerbuspilot
11-22-2010, 05:44 AM
Hey guys I need real numbers for the King Air B200 and 300...

B200 @ FL 240
and
300 @ FL 280

TAS?

Also....

I know the regs but can someone clarify if a BE200 pilot can log SIC in a BE300

Thanks....



Yesterday. @ FL-270 over central Texas in our 350, TAS was around 293-ish using about 790 ITT. Dont remember the exact number but the power setting woud be somewhere between normal and max cruise.

I usually run between 790-800 ITT and that results in TAS of 290 when its warm and 300 or so when it colder.

Its hard to go wrong with the 350, its a horse!


ps. using the default tas numbers on fltplan.com, 288-290, our flight times have been incredibly accurate... usually within 1 minute or so.

rgoeasy
11-22-2010, 05:52 AM
Hey satpak77, love that avitar. Any more pics of her?

Chally
11-22-2010, 06:45 AM
Indeed, just joined, and the first thing I saw was that avatar :)

But I also got something in by back head that was like 290 at FL270.

Cheers

satpak77
11-22-2010, 10:28 AM
oh yeah, I have plenty !

you guys are getting more out of your 350 than mine.....maybe its time for a fresh wax job

NYSPK9
11-22-2010, 05:00 PM
The B-350 which I fly, real-world is 270 TAS at mid-20's to upper 20's flight levels. 280 TAS? Nah dont plan on it.

It is single pilot airplane, unless you know something I don't, I can't see where one can log "SIC" in it...
It is a "Single Pilot" airplane, only if you have the single pilot type rating. It is possible to take the checkride with an SIC, and have the "SIC Required" restriction included with the type, at which time an SIC could legally log SIC time. Not sure if the SIC now needs an SIC Type. This came into existence after I went through the course.

schoolio
11-23-2010, 04:33 AM
Military version B200, -42 engines and 3-bladed props, about 260 KTAS in the mid-20's.

SkyHigh
11-23-2010, 06:44 AM
It is my understanding that you record whatever you want into your log book but can only use flight time that is considered to be valid by the FAA towards currency or a rating.

Employers and insurance companies are another set of entities that also have flight time valuation systems that can be apart from the FAA. Sometimes they accept flight times that the FAA does not and other times they discard times that are legal towards currency or a rating.

No one is going to be called to the carpet because they logged B200 sic time unless you try to use it where it will not be accepted..

Skyhigh

BroncoBird
12-01-2010, 04:50 PM
It is a "Single Pilot" airplane, only if you have the single pilot type rating. It is possible to take the checkride with an SIC, and have the "SIC Required" restriction included with the type, at which time an SIC could legally log SIC time. Not sure if the SIC now needs an SIC Type. This came into existence after I went through the course.


This is all correct. However, the SIC doesn't necessarily need an SIC type. They would just need to comply with 61.55, which in short is the 3 t/o's and ldgs, and be "familiar" with the systems, norm/abnorm procedures, limitations, manual, etc. etc. An SIC type rating is in fact required though if operating outside the USA. That being said, it is very easy to obtain. Just take your logbook showing compliance with 61.55 to the local FSDO, fill out an 8710, and in minutes you will have an SIC type rating with no practical test.

Back on topic, our 350's will consistently produce 300 TAS on 650-750pph in the low to mid 20's.

ZnCrO4
12-03-2010, 10:57 AM
Please correct me if I am wrong but the 350's equiped for more than 9 passenger seats require a second crew member even with a single pilot type.

satpak77
12-03-2010, 07:06 PM
Please correct me if I am wrong but the 350's equiped for more than 9 passenger seats require a second crew member even with a single pilot type.

Yes. Tried to find exact statement in POH tonight but two cervezas too many cant locate it buried somewhere

BroncoBird
12-04-2010, 02:06 PM
Please correct me if I am wrong but the 350's equiped for more than 9 passenger seats require a second crew member even with a single pilot type.

Correct sir. Whats up JN, its DH. Haven't been on here in a long time, but still remembered your chemistry-esque username.

quinny89
06-07-2011, 07:50 AM
Sorry to drudge up an old message string, but i'm a little confused, and since a few of you answered type rating question i was hoping you could help.

I have a buddy that wants me to help him fly a B200 from TX to Monte Carlo. He is from England, but holds a current FAA flight instructor certificate, and a PIC type rating in the B200. How could I log this time if i went with him? Just as 'dual' given flight time with no PIC or SIC, correct? Would that time be of any value in my logbook? I'd love to get a type rating in it, but it's just a ferry gig, so i wouldn't have access to another B200 to get a rating with, at this current time. I'm sure down the road it wouldn't hurt to have that training in my logbook, if the opportunity ever came around to get a rating and fly one for somebody someday.

Walkeraviator
06-07-2011, 08:34 AM
B200 is under 12500lbs and does not require a type rating. All you need is a multi-engine rating to log time. As for logging... all time as safety pilot (other guy under hood all the time in vfr) and all time as sole manipulator of the control is loggable as PIC. As for SIC logging... no go... it is a single pilot airplane under part 91 and thus does not require an SIC, so under 61.51 (f) it is not loggable.

It can only be logged as dual recieved from that guy as the instructor if you are using it toward a rating or something.

And remember, only one person can log PIC at a time when flying Part 91 and not flying under the hood or flight training.

quinny89
06-07-2011, 09:22 AM
Thanks Walker, that's EXACTLY the answer i wanted!!! Now, here's the hardest question of all, how in the heck do i convince the wife to LET me do this!??????!!! LOL!

Walkeraviator
06-07-2011, 09:49 AM
You're on your own there buddy.

quinny89
06-07-2011, 10:23 AM
Haha, see how ya are? :-) LOL

Thedude
06-07-2011, 01:16 PM
If your routinely flying a B-200 into the 20's, your in the wrong airframe.

BoilerUP
06-07-2011, 02:58 PM
If your routinely flying a B-200 into the 20's, your in the wrong airframe.

:confused:

B200 is an extremely efficient airplane in the low-mid 20s...

Yabadaba
06-29-2011, 07:41 PM
The 350 I fly gets around 300-305 TAS at 26-27 with 4-5 PAX. I have seen 312 at 260 with ITT 785 max.

Yes, the cleaners wax the hell out of it.

MikeB525
09-23-2011, 06:19 PM
The regulation you fly under affects SIC logging. You can log SIC if your presence as an SIC is required by the aircraft type certificate OR the regulation you're flying under. Specifically, BE200/300 SIC should be loggable if under 135, since 135 generally requires an SIC. Conversely, you cannot log SIC if your presence as an SIC is required only as per insurance requirement, operator preference, etc.

But here's the question I have: 135 can be done single pilot if the pilot and airplane are appropriately qualified. If there is a plane and pilot that is qualified to act single pilot 135, but they bring along a qualified SIC anyway, is that SIC time loggable?

USMCFLYR
09-23-2011, 08:09 PM
The regulation you fly under affects SIC logging. You can log SIC if your presence as an SIC is required by the aircraft type certificate OR the regulation you're flying under. Specifically, BE200/300 SIC should be loggable if under 135, since 135 generally requires an SIC. Conversely, you cannot log SIC if your presence as an SIC is required only as per insurance requirement, operator preference, etc.

But here's the question I have: 135 can be done single pilot if the pilot and airplane are appropriately qualified. If there is a plane and pilot that is qualified to act single pilot 135, but they bring along a qualified SIC anyway, is that SIC time loggable?
I log SIC - we fly P135 and 91.
Performance? I saw 300 TAS at 785 ITT in the mid-high FL200s in northern TX recently.
As for being in the wrong airframe if operating in the mid-high 20s (I assume you were taking a poke at him forwriting it like 2,000 ft), that is where I spend a majority of my time and it is a right nice airframe for the job :)

USMCFLYR

satpak77
09-24-2011, 08:10 AM
Performance? I saw 300 TAS at 785 ITT in the mid-high FL200s in northern TX recently.

USMCFLYR

what brand airplane wax you guys using....:)

USMCFLYR
09-24-2011, 08:14 AM
what brand airplane wax you guys using....:)
You must not have seen our aircraft before.
We believe in the ALL NATURAL form. Engine soot! :D

USMCFLYR