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onedayatatime
02-12-2011, 04:08 AM
After working for my current employer for the past 11 years my flight department recently closed down. Now I'm out looking for work. I have 3 failed TYPE rides in the past that haunt me when thinking about them. I failed a type ride 20 years ago. The last failure was 10 years ago with one in between at 16. I have 6 type ratings. Stupid mistakes that I made. I have been a pilot now for over 38 years. I never failed a line or pc check in my life. I am a 13000 hr pilot flying the G-V worldwide for the last 10 years. My faa record is clean. I am not proud of this and honestly getting sick over it but I take full responsibility. Now with the PRIA about to change. Will the corporate industry have access to the new pilot record data base? I was reading that it is only for 121 airlines for hiring decisions. How do I address this mess at an interview if it comes up? I know being honesty is the best bet. Any input would be appreciated guys.


PerfInit
02-12-2011, 05:55 AM
Don't beat yourself up too much! As (perfectionists) pilots, we tend to be really critical of ourselves, often to the "unhealthy" levels. This can turn into depression etc...

Let's look at the overall BIG picture:

You have had a long, successful, accident free flying career. I think you would look just fine to a prospective employer. Capitalize and sell yourself on the BIG picture (LOTS of experience and a safe flying record). It never hurts to be a bit humble (I learned from my mistakes and moved on....) Dwelling on it is unhealthy and wasted energy.

PRIA is typically used for 121. I am not certain if Part 91 or 135 will be using it. But regardless of that, just remember that NO pilot I have ever met is "Iceman" perfect. Were all human!

Hope this helps you! Stay motivated, eat healthy, exercise, and get adequate rest. A new position will present itself when the time is right.

BoilerUP
02-12-2011, 06:23 AM
I personally wouldn't let three busts (the last being a decade ago) stop me from considering you from employment at my company...but I would likely ask you to explain the circumstances of them during an interview.

As long as you own it and don't blame your instructor/examiner/FAA/sim-ism/etc., it wouldn't be a red flag to me...especially if you've successfully completed training since then.


Likeabat
02-12-2011, 06:59 AM
135 companies are required to pull PRIA records (as well as 121). I've never heard of a part 91 corporate department doing a PRIA records check - and don't even know if they would be granted access to the records.

That being said, honesty is the best policy.

Latitudedreamer
02-12-2011, 07:28 AM
Looks to me like your history of flying safely well outweighs your failed type rides. Lots of things can happen in the sim due to plenty of situations, weird schedules, flying with a different person than you normally fly with, etc, etc.... I probably wouldn't address it unless it specifically asks on the application. Good luck!

fjetter
02-12-2011, 09:00 AM
PRIA is required for 135 carriers, not sure if it is required for 91 subpart Ks (fractionals). With PRIA a future employer is only allow to ask about the preceding 5 years. Likewise your previous employer should only release the previous 5 years information. I think your long-time safety record and experience makes up for those busts.

121 carriers may be a bit more touchy to it due to the fact their accidents/incidents get more bogus media attention than 135/91 operations. We all know how the Colgan crew's history played out in the media.

Is it BS? Yes but some of the HR folks have to consider the PR aspect when hiring.

UCLAbruins
02-12-2011, 09:03 AM
Onedayatatime-

With your worldwide experience, 6 types and 38 years of flying, you're way beyond the "have you failed a check-ride"? stage. This late in the game why would anybody ask you that?, and if they do, a simple "I haven't failed a check-ride in 10 years" should take care of it. Once they see your resume, I'd be very surprised if you get asked that question.

All that PRIA-check-ride stuff is aimed mainly at the low-time guys who are trying to get on with the commuters. The regional airlines need some assurance that a new hire will be able to pass a 121 check-ride.

The economy should be your biggest concern, not that

zondaracer
02-12-2011, 10:50 AM
just remember that NO pilot I have ever met is "Iceman" perfect. Were all human!


I thought Tim Martins was Iceman perfect


(sorry, couldnīt resist)

BD100
02-12-2011, 11:21 AM
A quality part 91 operation will do an FAA records request of all records (ie more then 10 years). Basically, anything the FAA has on you a future employer will have access. Also a part 91 operator may and probably will do an extensive third party background check which will include criminal record, financial background, and employment history.

A pria is a seperate issue used for part 135 and 121.

onedayatatime
02-12-2011, 12:44 PM
Thanks guys for the vote of confidence. I had an interview the other day and was asked the “failed check ride” question. I was caught off guard and told them no. I really did not know the exact time frame and what the failures were about. I did not just want to dig myself a hole right then and there. I sent away for my complete faa record and sure enough everything is there. So now I have a better grip on what happen and when. I think I am going to get a call back. My question is this. Should I come clean and tell them. I’m not sure if they do a record check. Some tell me they don’t. I spoke to a few faa inspectors and they recommended to just leave it alone. Most of my buddies feel the same way. They say wait until you sign the papers! Then you come clean. For me..I’m not sure what to do but I hate not telling the truth. It’s like going in there with your tail between your legs and walking out looking like an idiot. At least now I am prepared for future interviews. Sometimes I wish I made a better career choice. This gets old looking for jobs every 10 years.......

UCLAbruins
02-12-2011, 02:27 PM
My question is this. Should I come clean and tell them. Iím not sure if they do a record check. Some tell me they donít. I spoke to a few faa inspectors and they recommended to just leave it alone. Most of my buddies feel the same way. They say wait until you sign the papers! Then you come clean. For me..Iím not sure what to do but I hate not telling the truth. Itís like going in there with your tail between your legs and walking out looking like an idiot. At least now I am prepared for future interviews. Sometimes I wish I made a better career choice. This gets old looking for jobs every 10 years.......

If you already interviewed and did not disclose that information, I'd probably leave it alone. As far as management is concerned, dishonesty is the greatest sin of all. It will be very difficult to explain undisclosed information after a job offer and keep that offer.

As for " telling them after signing the papers", that means nothing to them. Companies have yanked people out of ground schools, simulators, and in one case even a cockpit for dishonesty

Come clean my friend you have nothing to hide. I wish I had your credentials