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View Full Version : Any secrets to help get noticed?


kingairfun
02-27-2011, 11:32 PM
Furloughed NJA'er plugging away at my current job..(very fortunate!)

But I know it's not a career job, and I have a place in mind I'd like to be.. (close to home, great equipment, small 135 management type place) Pay is unknown, but has to be better than NJA SIC pay.

I do know a guy there from flight instruction days. But he doesn't make the decisions:p

From all you guys who make a living working strictly corporate. Are there any hints I should know to get my foot in the door? The guy I know is a pretty good acquantance, but I'm not real sure how reliable he will be to get an interview?

My plan was to write the Pres./CP a nice e-mail simply introducing myself (along with a resume) And then politely asking if it woukld be ok to send updated resumes every so often......

I have pretty healthy times (6500+TT, 4 jet types, 5000+ jet etc..) So I don't think the experience is an issue. I just want to do everything right because there may not be a second chance for smaller outfits..

Thanks!

PS.. visiting the airport or hanging around the hangar to get to know some of the guys is not an option at the moment...


BoilerUP
02-28-2011, 04:08 AM
Network, network, network, network.

Simply being furloughed NJA *could* be a problem, because NJA SIC pay (more importantly, benefits) is actually pretty good these days compared to typical SIC pay (at least in small-cabin aircraft) and many operators wouldn't want to hire you just to leave when you get recalled. Of course there are ways to mitigate that concern, but it IS a concern some folks will have so be prepared to deal with it.

Best of luck!

7Xdriver
02-28-2011, 04:56 AM
As BoilerUp says, you need cultivate relationships. I would say 99% of the best corporate jobs are aquired through recommendations from within or from peers (manager to manager). This will get you in the door, but won't necessarily get you hired.

The hardest thing a hiring manager has to do is find someone who will fit into the culture of the department. This has nothing to do with flight time, it has to do with your attitude, appearance, and your interpersonal skills. If the culture requires people with blue hair and you have red, guess what, you won't get hired. I suggest you seek out jobs where you think you will fit.

Another thing the hiring manager might consider is if you are local or not (live within 1 hour of work). If you are local and fit most of the mold, this will be in your favor. (Of course, if you are the perfect candidate, it won't matter so don't let it discourage you).

In my company, if you sent a letter to the President or CEO it would not help at all. I would stick to the Director of Operations or the Chief Pilot (who are normally the hiring managers).

So, if investing the time in networking is not an option, you might need to create a spiffy looking resume that might stand out in the pile of the other resumes with 5000hrs jet and 4 type ratings :).

Kevin


grimmdj
02-28-2011, 07:08 PM
I don't care how spiffy your resume is, it needs to be walked in personally.
Walk it into everybody, don't mail it and never e-mail it, you never know when they will need somebody.
Dave

clipperskipper
02-28-2011, 07:33 PM
I found a lot of connections on F@cebook, for what it's worth. Being out of the business for a long time hurts, but the connections and interviews are starting to fall into place. Corporate is a relatively small circle, as above, networking is key here.

NowCorporate
03-01-2011, 03:47 AM
I found a lot of connections on F@cebook, for what it's worth. Being out of the business for a long time hurts, but the connections and interviews are starting to fall into place. Corporate is a relatively small circle, as above, networking is key here.

Like any social networking concept - be careful with Facebook etc.

I have seen pilots on facebook who post such absurd stuff I'd never consider hiring them.

I have seen pictures of the bosses airplane with N-number, pictures of the bosses house, pictures of his boat, pictures of passengers, details of every trip the boss takes, hell I have even seen facebook apps people post that show their upcoming filed flight plan!....n-Number, routes, destination...the whole thing. Unreal. We are very small and dont have a social network policy specifically (have a confidentiality clause) but I can guarantee you would be fired for posting some of the stuff I have seen....and rightfully so.

Nothing wrong with a fun anonymous picture or location etc just use discretion. Its not between "friends" (are they your friends because they are on facebook?)....People copy things off Facebook and send them around all the time. I have gotten more than one "do you know f'n idiot" inquires.

Really common sense stuff - but you would be amazed. I would certainly check Facebook when considering a new pilot, and there are people I would never consider or rec'd for a job based on entirely on their facebook postings. Don't put anything there that you wouldn't want the people you fly to see, because they may.

Anyhow - send a resume and follow up with a phone call. Dont just "drop in"..not a good idea at most hangars. It takes years to build up a solid network, theres no magic formula for it...be qualified, be local...outside of that consider yourself a long shot without very good connections and references.

Good Luck!

BoilerUP
03-01-2011, 05:42 AM
One definitely needs to be VERY careful with Facebook if its being used to professionally network...and that's certainly not limited to the aviation community.

DISCRETION is the word - and as a pilot you not only need to show some in what you do and say, but just how much of those things you tell the world.

While I do have pictures of my company's airplane on FB that include registration number, everything is in accordance with our corporate social network policy (and folks, don't think nobody from your company will check you out, because they do). Additionally, my boss has rebuffed multiple suggestions about joining the BARR program and has told me point-blank that he doesn't care who knows where his plane is going - then again, he's a small businessman in a largely overlooked profession and not a captain of industry. This certainly doesn't mean other owners/operators feel the same way, and the prudent pilot should differentiate between the two viewpoints and know what NOT to post in a given situation for a given operator, and what NOT to post - ever...

AKASHA
03-01-2011, 06:36 AM
I have seen pictures of the bosses airplane with N-number, pictures of the bosses house, pictures of his boat, pictures of passengers, details of every trip the boss takes, hell I have even seen


Grammar and etiquette also helps.

NowCorporate
03-01-2011, 06:41 AM
Grammar and etiquette also helps.

the spellin cops are here! - every board needs one.

Mink
03-01-2011, 06:56 AM
Excellent points. Exactly why I have never joined FB.

AKASHA
03-01-2011, 07:14 AM
the spellin cops are here! - every board needs one.

You forgot etiquette. And your spelling was fine enough. Your grammar was wrong. By the way, you spelled 'spelling' wrong. I guess not fine enough.

NowCorporate
03-01-2011, 11:59 AM
Excellent points. Exactly why I have never joined FB.

Nothing wrong with Facebook. It's an OK way to keep up with family and friends and I would certainly be on it if your kids are....I also like seeing what friends, their kids, etc, are up to all in one place. Its convenient on my phone as I dont travel with a laptop often...anyhow..

Its just that its certainly nobody's business what your boss does, where he vacations, where he does business, etc. It has never occurred to me to share that with friends, family, etc...and certainly not with the entire world on Facebook! - like anyone really cares? Its not your plane, house, boat etc and kinda makes you look like a clown anyhow. Bonus points if it's a public traded company! - everyone loves to hear about the multiple Aspen trips during the holidays when the stock is down 50% over a few years....:o....N-Numbers in the pictures and your employer info listed right there. Very good.

All common sense to the majority of people, which may explain why its a challenge to many pilots...:-)

cobber
03-02-2011, 06:05 PM
Ill pipe in a repeat what was said in the other replies. "Network"

Theres nothing else that you can do that will make a bigger impression than to go and talk to these people on a regular basis. Make it very clearly known that you want to work with this company and that you are willing to do what it takes to make the operation run smoothly. Assure them that you are (im assuming you are) a team player.
Above all let them know that you have no interest in going back to NJA and expect to bring a copy of your letter of resignation from NJA too..... As BoilerUP said - that could be a deal killer when they see that on your resume so head them off at the pass. I personally know of a situation at the Nordstrom flight department where they hired a guy on furlough from Delta and typed him in 2 of their a/c. He then proceeded to go back to Delta with very short notice to the company and left them in a bind. The CP will never hire a guy like that again now, its just not worth the risk of them leaving.

Its my impression that operators with larger aircraft dont want a revolving door as it just costs money and a lot of times the boss doesnt like seeing new faces all the time. I know mine doesnt want that.

Cubdriver
03-02-2011, 06:17 PM
Actually I have heard reports that some employers and employees will check FB on days that you call in sick and see what turns up and if they can match it to the day. Apparently some people have the lack of foresight to friend their bosses and colleagues and then post pictures of enjoyable-looking exploits from sick days. I always assume anything I put on FB is fodder for use against me through any of a number of possible misuses.