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View Full Version : Becoming a Avionics Technician


morrison87
03-27-2017, 07:56 AM
Hey Folks,
Looking to become a avionics technician. I have my A&P and FCC license. trying to find info on becoming a Avionics tech. I've searched and cannot find anything out there. I'm looking to be able to build panels trouble shoot and work on avionics. from my understanding i should need to get certified. How do i do that. any help would be greatly appreciated.


kevbo
03-27-2017, 03:05 PM
Hey Folks,
Looking to become a avionics technician. I have my A&P and FCC license. trying to find info on becoming a Avionics tech. I've searched and cannot find anything out there. I'm looking to be able to build panels trouble shoot and work on avionics. from my understanding i should need to get certified. How do i do that. any help would be greatly appreciated.

Learn how make panels and troubleshoot, then go to a place that works on airplanes and say "I do avionics". In the maintenance world, you learn by doing. The military spits out more than enough aircraft electricians, they can get airline jobs and have A&Ps sign for their work.

Flyhayes
03-27-2017, 03:31 PM
I could be wrong, but I believe that it's more a function of certifying the actual repair station versus the individual. Check with the different avionics shops.


morrison87
03-28-2017, 04:34 AM
I appreciate the help. I am fully capable of being able to work on avionics and know electronics well. just wanted to find out if a certificate is needed like the A&P requires.

Flyhayes
03-28-2017, 07:39 AM
This A/C might be applicable to what you are looking for:
http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance_Library/rgAdvisoryCircular.nsf/0/2039140ef0ef77ce862569dc00722411/$FILE/AC65-24.pdf

JohnBurke
03-28-2017, 10:12 PM
Hey Folks,
Looking to become a avionics technician. I have my A&P and FCC license. trying to find info on becoming a Avionics tech. I've searched and cannot find anything out there. I'm looking to be able to build panels trouble shoot and work on avionics. from my understanding i should need to get certified. How do i do that. any help would be greatly appreciated.

Google "sorcery."

I appreciate the help. I am fully capable of being able to work on avionics and know electronics well. just wanted to find out if a certificate is needed like the A&P requires.

The FAA has no avionics certification. The closest you'll find is the FCC's GROL, or General Radiotelephone Operators License, which is applicable to working on radar, transmitters, radio repair, etc. It's not specific to aviation, and applies equally to maritime equipment, and so forth. The GROL also enables you to supervise others performing that work.

CrimsonEclipse
04-03-2017, 10:23 AM
Hey Folks,
Looking to become a avionics technician. I have my A&P and FCC license. trying to find info on becoming a Avionics tech. I've searched and cannot find anything out there. I'm looking to be able to build panels trouble shoot and work on avionics. from my understanding i should need to get certified. How do i do that. any help would be greatly appreciated.

The GROL will help, but experience is the key.

So learn to make breakout boxes, get your hands on everything electrical. Lights, batteries, even if it has nothing to do with avionics. Troubleshooting skills are far better than certifications.

That said, if you DO want to get a GROL, you can do it on your own. Yes, there is a LOT of reading involved.

The GROL has several "elements" or sections. You must test for each element. I will suggest studying for Element 1 (definitions) Element 3 (the big meat and potatoes section) and Element 8 Radar, which is optional, but a nice to have and a relatively easy test. (shipboard elements like 2 won't be necessary.

You can take the tests one at a time or all at once, your call.
Many shops don't know what a GROL is and many don't care.
It DOES show that you know the basics.

And again

Troubleshooting Troubleshooting Troubleshooting ....

Kougarok
02-13-2018, 06:05 AM
Thereís only 3 things you canít do with your A&P/ IA.
1) Work on instruments
2) Overhaul a propeller
3) Do the biennial transponder certification.

kevbo
02-13-2018, 11:01 PM
Thereís only 3 things you canít do with your A&P/ IA.
1) Work on instruments
2) Overhaul a propeller
3) Do the biennial transponder certification.
4) Earn a living wage!

geosync
02-21-2018, 09:13 AM
The industry is moving towards recognizing the AET certification for avionics. A quick job search on Indeed.com will show that more and more employers are acknowledging the certification as the standard of knowledge.

https://www.astm.org/CERTIFICATION/DOCS/217.NCATT_AET_Standard.pdf

It is NOT an FAA certification, so it is not needed legally, but will probably help your career if you so choose to pursue it. Couldn't hurt.

Kougarok
04-07-2018, 08:38 PM
4) Earn a living wage!

Actually I do pretty well with my side business. I can easily support my family if my pilot job goes away.

JohnBurke
04-08-2018, 05:59 PM
Actually I do pretty well with my side business. I can easily support my family if my pilot job goes away.

Likewise. I've never let mine lapse and use it regularly, and won't have any trouble securing work. I've been furloughed and immediately had work turning wrenches, with a steady stream of other furloughees coming by the shop looking or work and unable to find it.

I've also had a number of flying positions thanks to holding that certificate, so it's far from wasted. In fact, I've been able to double my pilot salary by holding both certifications, and I've been able do seasonal jobs that let me fly part of the year and stay indoors and work on aircraft in the winter...and be home every night. Hard to beat that.

kevbo
04-08-2018, 06:31 PM
Actually I do pretty well with my side business. I can easily support my family if my pilot job goes away.
I know, there is enough money in it if you can charge the customer directly and do all the work yourself. Everyone who cant make that leap is stuck at minimum wage. The going shop rates aren't enough to support living wages for everyone.

navigator
06-26-2018, 12:23 PM
Go to the airlines. Most are hiring Avionics Electronics Techs (AET's). Many will have you take an electronics specific test during the interview process. If you ace that, have an FCC, you may be offered an AET position. Otherwise take an AP position then transfer once in the door.

kevbo
07-07-2018, 09:45 AM
Go to the airlines. Most are hiring Avionics Electronics Techs (AET's). Many will have you take an electronics specific test during the interview process. If you ace that, have an FCC, you may be offered an AET position. Otherwise take an AP position then transfer once in the door.

Why hasn't the FAA made avionics its own certificate? The work is far more cerebral and abstract than anything an A&P does.

navigator
07-07-2018, 10:25 AM
Why hasn't the FAA made avionics its own certificate? The work is far more cerebral and abstract than anything an A&P does.

Not sure about that. The FCC (general radiotelephone) license really meets the need for a distinct license and classification.