Airline Pilot Forums

Airline Pilot Forums was designed to be a community where working airline pilots can share ideas and information about the aviation field. In the forum you will find information about major and regional airline carriers, career training, interview and job seeker help, finance, and living the airline pilot lifestyle.




Sliceback
06-11-2017, 07:43 AM
What Will a Year Cost Me? | AviationBull (http://aviationbull.com/2017/mar/28/what-will-year-cost-me)

Apologies if it's already been posted.


pony172
06-12-2017, 08:16 AM
Excellent, a must read for anyone on the fence.

F4E Mx
06-12-2017, 12:07 PM
Another point to consider (as if one is needed) is what happens to the USAF pilot if he busts his medical? If they are sending pilots to do ground duty for a year in the Middle East it would seem that various slots would be available until retirement? And what does loss of license insurance cost the airline pilot and what are the payouts? A friend of a friend was working for Delta and had a mild stroke. He obviously is not flying anymore and I hear his situation after paying alimony is not too great. What percentage of airline pilots actually make it to normal retirement? Not touting the USAF, just random thoughts.


C130driver
06-12-2017, 07:52 PM
Another point to consider (as if one is needed) is what happens to the USAF pilot if he busts his medical? If they are sending pilots to do ground duty for a year in the Middle East it would seem that various slots would be available until retirement? And what does loss of license insurance cost the airline pilot and what are the payouts? A friend of a friend was working for Delta and had a mild stroke. He obviously is not flying anymore and I hear his situation after paying alimony is not too great. What percentage of airline pilots actually make it to normal retirement? Not touting the USAF, just random thoughts.

Off topic (sort of) but relevant: another reason for pilots to get a degree. Obviously that applies to civilian pilots but the thought of losing the medical is terrifying. That's why I didn't feel bad getting the masters, even though when I was a LT it was (get your masters!!!!!..) now it's masked.

Sputnik
06-13-2017, 02:47 AM
In the AF the answer is, depends on how you lost your medical. If it is something that prevents you from flying but not from serving, there are many options available from cross training career fields to filling jobs that require
rated personnel. I've known several people who lost their medical who served quite usefully to retirement.

For a Delta pilot, if you lose your medical you will be pay protected till you run out of sick leave, then transition to long term disability until age 65. LTD is basically half pay. Depending on your position when you become sick (and how much alimony you owe) this can be a pretty not bad amount of money. Obviously a huge paycut, but in raw terms you shouldn't be eating cat food. If pilot joined DPSP they can be made financially whole for up to two years.

There is loss of license insurance, the little I've seen didn't seem to have much value. But honestly, I know very little on subject.

JTwift
06-14-2017, 06:07 PM
What Will a Year Cost Me? | AviationBull (http://aviationbull.com/2017/mar/28/what-will-year-cost-me)

Apologies if it's already been posted.

If I skim-read that correctly, the guy is assuming that you'll go directly to a Major if you hadn't taken that non-flying deployment. News flash...not all mil get picked up to go directly to the majors.i know it's shocking, but...there it is.

I mean, he kind of addresses it at the end, but there are a lot of assumptions being made here. There's a lot of individual contemplation to be had.

And his coming from a recently retired guy who was sick of the AF when I got out.

KC10 FATboy
06-19-2017, 08:06 AM
If I skim-read that correctly, the guy is assuming that you'll go directly to a Major if you hadn't taken that non-flying deployment. News flash...not all mil get picked up to go directly to the majors.i know it's shocking, but...there it is.

Agree. In my experience most military pilots I knew that didn't get hired had some type of issue going on: recency of flying time, check ride failure, low flying time, low PIC time, or lack of other flying positions (instructor, check airman, safety etc etc). Your application must be competitive. You shouldn't be making this decision on a whim. You need to plan your exit and should have started a year out from your exit.

Check6Viper
06-19-2017, 10:01 AM
If I skim-read that correctly, the guy is assuming that you'll go directly to a Major if you hadn't taken that non-flying deployment.

He runs the numbers using the assumption that you spend 1 and 2 years at a regional as well.

TankerDriver
06-20-2017, 01:34 PM
Of course maintaining sanity is not counted as factor.

Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk

crewdawg
06-21-2017, 05:03 AM
Every single one of my buddies that ended their time in the AF in a flying position, have gone directly to the legacies/FedEx/UPS. I had a few Indoc classmates that ended their career in non-flying gigs who did spend some time at a regional. One received an invite within a week of finishing training and he spent less than 3 months flying the line at his regional. Another classmate spent less than 6 months at his regional.

Of course his numbers are full of assumptions, that's why he clearly lists them out. I would say it's a safe assumption to either spend no time or less than 1 years at a regional.

ArmyFW
06-23-2017, 06:30 AM
Do you think this changes at all for an army Warrant Officer pilot? Only 6 years flying vs the 10 mandated by the AF

Vincent Chase
06-27-2017, 08:44 AM
Do you think this changes at all for an army Warrant Officer pilot? Only 6 years flying vs the 10 mandated by the AF
Fixed wing or rotary? That could make a difference...

ArmyFW
07-01-2017, 01:40 PM
All time will be fixed wing. Mostly C-12 king Air with a small chance of flying the dash 7 or citation (but I doubt the last two)

Sliceback
07-01-2017, 03:10 PM
Don't be surprised if King Air only time requires a tour in the regionals before your resume gains traction.

Sliceback
07-01-2017, 03:14 PM
Make sure you get a four yr degree.

ArmyFW
07-01-2017, 08:11 PM
Already working on that degree now. I should be done with it this year. And yea I'm starting to get a little excited knowing that I may have a chance because of the pilot shortage.

Sliceback
07-02-2017, 06:15 AM
apc's 'airline profiles' published the retirement data for specific airlines by year.