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View Full Version : Training Contracts


cobalt650
07-12-2017, 08:05 AM
In the current hiring environment, are training contracts in place at some corporate outfits? I.e., if we type you, you will need to stay here for xx years or we will recoup training costs.


BPWI
07-12-2017, 09:02 AM
In the current hiring environment, are training contracts in place at some corporate outfits? I.e., if we type you, you will need to stay here for xx years or we will recoup training costs.

In short? Yes. Contract length is usually dictated by the cost of the type. Its business, especially under the current market conditions.

Brett Hull
07-12-2017, 12:13 PM
True corporate? In this environment if you sign one you're crazy. The company needs to make it worthwhile for you to work there. Too many other opportunities out there if they don't.


Falcondrivr
07-13-2017, 08:12 AM
Training contracts are not necessary if you create an environment that allows a good quality of life and encourages employees to stay. If a prospective employer asked me to sign one, I would assume it was because they have a turnover problem. It's not 1995 anymore.

ZippyNH
07-13-2017, 12:37 PM
Some might ask you to sign what I call a "back-door" training contract, AKA, a non-compete....often because some states, like NH, have laws that nullify training contracts, or make them hard or difficult to enforce.
Basically states if you leave, you cannot fly the same aircraft type without repaying the training cost and or work for another company flying the same equipment in a set geographic region.
Phraseology can vary, but the intent is to make hard to take a job, get trained, then use the training and experience you just received to get a better paying job in the same area.
Do ask before you accept a job.

BPWI
07-14-2017, 09:02 AM
True corporate? In this environment if you sign one you're crazy. The company needs to make it worthwhile for you to work there. Too many other opportunities out there if they don't.

What does one consider "True Corporate"? By no means do I condone companies utilizing training contracts, but unless you have the requisite experience why would any department drop 65K on a type with the market conditions the way they currently are? Here in the NE, guys are jumping for less than 5% (Captain IV/V). Its a very expensive gamble for any company.

To the OP, much depends on aircraft category/class. If you care to expound a little more about your situation we can give you more detail.

Lucky8888
07-15-2017, 05:40 PM
You are correct. When some type ratings are fast approaching $100K, a business has the protect their investment and that's not just a training contract. It's QOL, pay (we pay more than NBAA max), benefits, etc. When we had G550's we had a few guys/gals on a two-year training contract pro-rated daily. When we moved to 650's, it was easy to upgrade them and we paid. We must be doing something right because we haven't had a turnover in 4 years. For good or for bad training contracts are becoming a fact of life, at least according to my NBAA friends.

Red Forman
07-17-2017, 06:19 PM
I've never signed a contract, never will sign a contract, and don't know anyone that is under any kind of contract.

Red Forman
07-18-2017, 05:10 PM
I've never signed a contract, never will sign a contract, and don't know anyone that is under any kind of contract.

I take that back. I would sign a training contract as long as it was a two way street. If I have to pay back the value of training, then my employer has to guarantee my employment for the duration of the contract. If they terminate me for any reason then they owe me pay and benefits for the duration of the contract. If I am going to be on a financial hook, then they are too.

GogglesPisano
07-18-2017, 06:11 PM
I take that back. I would sign a training contract as long as it was a two way street. If I have to pay back the value of training, then my employer has to guarantee my employment for the duration of the contract. If they terminate me for any reason then they owe me pay and benefits for the duration of the contract. If I am going to be on a financial hook, then they are too.

Funny how you will never see a training contract worded that way. It's fine for them to "recoup their costs" if you bail -- but if business turns south and "your services are no longer needed" you're SOL.

Training contracts = indentured servitude. Pay people well, treat people well and they will stay.

Lizardpilot
07-21-2017, 08:17 PM
It's funny how even when you have the type a company still wants a training contract. Why? I asked and they said we're putting you through a full type rating course so you will get a type rating. I already have it so how about you increase my salary by the amount of the training contract since the type I already have is worth that much to you. Most HR people don't get the irony of that statement. Type rating is required by FAA and most insurance companies, cost of doing business. As others have stated, if the position has a good balance between QOL and pay most people won't jump ship at the drop of a hat. Just my .02 cents.