Airline Pilot Forums

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cobalt650
09-29-2017, 05:35 AM
Gang,
The GE news and some other observations triggered this post. Is there a trend in the business aviation industry to move from company owned platforms and employees to managed assets, i.e. NetJets or Gamma type operations? And if this is becoming more common, is that a good or bad thing for pilots? I'm a bit concerned that joining what appears to be a solid, company owned outfit would transition to managed down the road and all would be starting all over again. Appreciate inputs/experiences. Thanks!


Rajplt
09-29-2017, 08:56 AM
This, at least in the past, has been cyclical. Companies have been known to drop internal departments and go with management companies or NetJets. This lasts a few years and then many times the company realizes that an internal department is best.
I worked for a large management company and they did as good a job as they could, but the structure is inherently setup that it can't give the individual service an internal department can.
I gave up on corporate aviation and went 121 due to companies like GE closing shop. The flying was more fun, but for me the stability offered by the company I currently fly for was the key factor.

cobalt650
09-29-2017, 11:00 AM
This, at least in the past, has been cyclical. Companies have been known to drop internal departments and go with management companies or NetJets. This lasts a few years and then many times the company realizes that an internal department is best.
I worked for a large management company and they did as good a job as they could, but the structure is inherently setup that it can't give the individual service an internal department can.
I gave up on corporate aviation and went 121 due to companies like GE closing shop. The flying was more fun, but for me the stability offered by the company I currently fly for was the key factor.

Thank you. The major vs corporate decision is one I ponder daily.


geosync
09-29-2017, 11:33 AM
Gang,
The GE news and some other observations triggered this post. Is there a trend in the business aviation industry to move from company owned platforms and employees to managed assets, i.e. NetJets or Gamma type operations? And if this is becoming more common, is that a good or bad thing for pilots? I'm a bit concerned that joining what appears to be a solid, company owned outfit would transition to managed down the road and all would be starting all over again. Appreciate inputs/experiences. Thanks!

Coming from the insurance industry that is involved with all these types of ops, it's a mixed bag. We are seeing some corps that are being bought out by others sell their jets in favor of Netjets, but the real heavy hitters seem to be staying with their flight departments and even upgrading.

HwkrPlt
09-30-2017, 02:56 AM
I fly a fully managed aircraft, and its kind of nice, because a lot of the paperwork and billing is taken care of by the management company. It really makes our lives a lot easier. Can't say it makes my job any more or less stable, aside from the fact that if my airplane goes away, they will try to put you on another managed airplane. Your quality of life and job stability all depends on the owner of the aircraft. Thankfully my owner is great. Is it more stable than working for a major? Debatable, and I'll never make as much money as working for a major, but my QOL is really good.


Thank you. The major vs corporate decision is one I ponder daily.

If you actually have that choice, then my advice is to go major. But I don't think getting hired at a major is really that simple. You won't have a decision to make until you get an offer letter.

cobalt650
10-01-2017, 06:02 PM
I fly a fully managed aircraft, and its kind of nice, because a lot of the paperwork and billing is taken care of by the management company. It really makes our lives a lot easier. Can't say it makes my job any more or less stable, aside from the fact that if my airplane goes away, they will try to put you on another managed airplane. Your quality of life and job stability all depends on the owner of the aircraft. Thankfully my owner is great. Is it more stable than working for a major? Debatable, and I'll never make as much money as working for a major, but my QOL is really good.




If you actually have that choice, then my advice is to go major. But I don't think getting hired at a major is really that simple. You won't have a decision to make until you get an offer letter.

Fortunate to have both. First world problem.

HwkrPlt
10-02-2017, 03:33 AM
Fortunate to have both. First world problem.

You're a lucky person.

My vote is for the major, especially if you'd be able to live in base. While a great corporate job, IMHO, beats the pants of flying for a major, you never know if it is going to stay great. If you work for a HNWI, what if he/she has something tragic happen to them? If you work for a large corporation, what happens when a new CEO comes in and they need to get the share price up by $.10/share that quarter? At least with the airlines you know what you are going to get, for the most part, and with all the hiring going on now, you're going to have the security of seniority.

Best of luck with your decision.

tennesseeflyboy
11-08-2017, 05:44 PM
While the majors are hiring in huge numbers , don't wait too long to jump ship over to the majors !!! Seniority number is HUGE , cannot put enough emphasis on how important the Seniority number is to your career with a major airline ..........



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