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View Full Version : Civilian schedules


Blackhawk
11-28-2017, 04:57 AM
I’m putting together a PowerPoint for military pilots thinking about transitioning to the civilian side. I have my schedule, but I wanted to show some typical schedules at various carriers, 121, 135, 91(k) for various seniority levels rather than just a very senior regional schedule. If anyone is willing can you PM me a snapshot of your schedule, minus any personal data such as names and employee numbers. If you feel comfortable include carrier (or just “legacy, LCC, ULCC, regional,135, 91(k)), and how long you’ve been there so I have a reference for them.
Also if anyone who recently made the jump wants to toss in “I wish I’d known this” things to include.
Thanks.


F15andMD11
11-29-2017, 06:47 PM
What are you trying to show? Most guys won't care IMO. They want the airline job and military initially. When it's gets too much the military will lose out. If you want to show that as a new airline pilot you will have only 3 days off a month (unit mission dependent) then ok. But they won't want to hear that.

Blackhawk
12-01-2017, 03:43 PM
What are you trying to show? Most guys won't care IMO. They want the airline job and military initially. When it's gets too much the military will lose out. If you want to show that as a new airline pilot you will have only 3 days off a month (unit mission dependent) then ok. But they won't want to hear that.
Part of the brief will give them an idea of the schedules they will have. Mine shows working only 8 days in November, 7 in December for 75 hours credit each month. Not very realistic for a new hire.
Not sure which airline Pilot only gets 3 days off each month. Worst I ever had was 10.


F15andMD11
12-02-2017, 01:38 PM
Not sure which airline Pilot only gets 3 days off each month. Worst I ever had was 10. Oops, bad assumption on my part.:eek: I was thinking you were including a military pilot's guard/reserve schedule. I mean what pilot leaving active duty wouldn't go guard/reserve?;)

Hobbit64
12-02-2017, 03:21 PM
Oops, bad assumption on my part.:eek: I was thinking you were including a military pilot's guard/reserve schedule. I mean what pilot leaving active duty wouldn't go guard/reserve?;)

Maybe the the one looking to use TRS and stretch it to '20 Good Years' for the guaranteed annuity....
Or the one who needed to get just one more trip 'over there' to smell the powder again.
Damn my desire to be with my brothers and sisters....

Blackhawk
12-03-2017, 10:17 AM
Even when I did Guard I had pleanty of time off. As an IP I flew when I wanted and was able to get orders to fly that conflicted with trips I didn’t like.
Also, as a commuter I would do stand ups and Guard flying. One leg, sleep in a hotel for 6 hours, one leg back, sleep in the ready room for about 3 hours, fly a hop for the Guard, do it again. Then go home for four days.
For my two weeks of summer drill I would bid a standup line worth about 30 hours. Then drop the thrips thatbdid not conflict with annual training, pick up 2 four days and I was back up to guarantee.

Dirty30
12-03-2017, 01:20 PM
Even when I did Guard I had pleanty of time off. As an IP I flew when I wanted and was able to get orders to fly that conflicted with trips I didn’t like.
Also, as a commuter I would do stand ups and Guard flying. One leg, sleep in a hotel for 6 hours, one leg back, sleep in the ready room for about 3 hours, fly a hop for the Guard, do it again. Then go home for four days.
For my two weeks of summer drill I would bid a standup line worth about 30 hours. Then drop the thrips thatbdid not conflict with annual training, pick up 2 four days and I was back up to guarantee.

I might be missing something here, did you commute to both the guard and the airline?

Blackhawk
12-03-2017, 02:17 PM
I might be missing something here, did you commute to both the guard and the airline?

Guard and Airline base were at the same location. Actually made things easier in a sense. When I was home, I was home.

Dirty30
12-03-2017, 02:24 PM
Guard and Airline base were at the same location. Actually made things easier in a sense. When I was home, I was home.

That's the way to do it... I know I'm going to live less than an hour away from the mil base, but I'm thinking I'll have a long drive or commute by air to the airline base. I'm just trying to get a feel for what the lifestyle is like before it comes time to make a decision, since there's no telling how the regionals are gonna be in a few months.

PurpleToolBox
12-03-2017, 08:57 PM
Part of the brief will give them an idea of the schedules they will have. Mine shows working only 8 days in November, 7 in December for 75 hours credit each month. Not very realistic for a new hire.
Not sure which airline Pilot only gets 3 days off each month. Worst I ever had was 10.

Um what airline do you work for? I want to work there where I can average 10 credit hours a day. Thanks

Adlerdriver
12-04-2017, 04:10 AM
Um what airline do you work for? I want to work there where I can average 10 credit hours a day. Thanks Clearly sitting reserve living in domicile, getting called out infrequently and only counting actual fly days as work.

It also sounds like a seniority based refusal option for trips based on his new hire comment. Probably have long/short call reserve options too. I seriously doubt you can find a reserve system worse than the one we have a FedEx.

Blackhawk
12-04-2017, 05:46 AM
Clearly sitting reserve living in domicile, getting called out infrequently and only counting actual fly days as work.

It also sounds like a seniority based refusal option for trips based on his new hire comment. Probably have long/short call reserve options too. I seriously doubt you can find a reserve system worse than the one we have a FedEx.
My company messed up in our last contract and gave us something called “Vacation Low”. ALPA National even warned our management that it was a bad idea, but they were so anxious to get PBS they agreed to it anyway.
Basically, if I have one day of vacation in a month I can set my min PBS threshold to 65 hours but I will still be paid at 75 hours. Since I’m senior enough to bid all the carry over months in a year, that’s 8 months of the year where I only need 65 hours of credit but get paid for 75 hours.
We will be losing it soon.

Blackhawk
12-04-2017, 05:57 AM
That's the way to do it... I know I'm going to live less than an hour away from the mil base, but I'm thinking I'll have a long drive or commute by air to the airline base. I'm just trying to get a feel for what the lifestyle is like before it comes time to make a decision, since there's no telling how the regionals are gonna be in a few months.

They have to let you go for Guard/Reserve duty. Obviously try not to have conflicts during training or obuse the system.
Some airlines are better about it than others. I’ve heard of some (GoJet), giving pilots a hard time.
At mine it was never an issue. I just had my Guard unit send scheduling a copy of a memo or orders and the portions of my trip that conflicted were dropped. If I did not pick anything else up (I normally didn’t), my pay was prorated for the month. As an IP I pretty much got to fly whenever I wanted to fly.

F15andMD11
12-04-2017, 11:52 AM
...One leg, sleep in a hotel for 6 hours, one leg back, sleep in the ready room for about 3 hours, fly a hop for the Guard... Each unit varies obviously but what you described certainly wouldn't cut it in the ANG.

joepilot
12-04-2017, 02:19 PM
Um what airline do you work for? I want to work there where I can average 10 credit hours a day. Thanks

It used to be possible at "my house".

One day turns LAX-OGG or KOA or HNL. 10.5 actual on the DC-8 and DC-10. The most senior dude in the base in each crew position would do this on Tuesdays and Thursdays for an 84 hour month. The best I ever held was Mondays and Wednesdays.

Joe

Blackhawk
12-05-2017, 08:09 AM
Each unit varies obviously but what you described certainly wouldn't cut it in the ANG.

Worked out fine in my ANG unit. AFTP is four hours, 1.5 of flying. Easily did so.

John Carr
12-05-2017, 10:24 AM
Um what airline do you work for? I want to work there where I can average 10 credit hours a day. Thanks

Clearly sitting reserve living in domicile, getting called out infrequently and only counting actual fly days as work.

It also sounds like a seniority based refusal option for trips based on his new hire comment. Probably have long/short call reserve options too. I seriously doubt you can find a reserve system worse than the one we have a FedEx.

My company messed up in our last contract and gave us something called “Vacation Low”. ALPA National even warned our management that it was a bad idea, but they were so anxious to get PBS they agreed to it anyway.
Basically, if I have one day of vacation in a month I can set my min PBS threshold to 65 hours but I will still be paid at 75 hours. Since I’m senior enough to bid all the carry over months in a year, that’s 8 months of the year where I only need 65 hours of credit but get paid for 75 hours.
We will be losing it soon.

If he’s using the “Vacation Low” provision, well, it’s a vacation month and NOT the norm. Nor is it a norm for almost every PBS system out there.

JB’s come pretty close though from what I hear.

Adlerdriver
12-05-2017, 12:02 PM
One leg, sleep in a hotel for 6 hours, one leg back, sleep in the ready room for about 3 hours, fly a hop for the Guard, do it again. I don't think F15andMD11 is referring to pay issues. I had a RJ guy in my crashpad doing "stand ups" so I'm familiar. Basically last flight into a station, min rest - not legal to reset a new duty period and first flight out in the morning. Technically about 10-ish hours on duty from late night to just after sun up with a short nap somewhere in the middle.
To then sleep in "the ready room for about 3 hours" and go fly for the Guard and then "do it again" is what he's saying wouldn't cut it. Crew rest in the AF/ANG is typically given the big boy approach and that kind of stuff isn't tracked, especially when it involves a mix with civilian flying. Last I knew, the AFI required 12 hours of rest prior to showing for flying duty and that's on you to make happen. You're kidding yourself if you think that schedule was anywhere near compliance. Any leadership aware of what you were doing and letting it continue was certainly lucky they didn't have to answer the mail had you been involved in any kind of incident.

galaxy flyer
12-05-2017, 12:04 PM
as a commuter I would do stand ups and Guard flying. One leg, sleep in a hotel for 6 hours, one leg back, sleep in the ready room for about 3 hours, fly a hop for the Guard, do it again.

Are you familiar with 12 hours of pre-duty crew rest rule in the Guard or any AF organization?

There was a famous F-101 (I think) accident on the Oregon ANG. Pilot flew a red-eye, tried trip-turning that day—fatal collision on form take-off on the third turn, IIRC.

GF

rickair7777
12-05-2017, 01:25 PM
Are you familiar with 12 hours of pre-duty crew rest rule in the Guard or any AF organization?

Does that apply to military duty, or do you really have to be "resting"... which is hard to define legally on a good day.

Adlerdriver
12-05-2017, 01:58 PM
Does that apply to military duty, or do you really have to be "resting"... which is hard to define legally on a good day. The AF regulation wasn't set up to deal with multiple sources of employment or a mix of civilian and military flying.

The most basic application of the reg would be if you're scheduled to show at the squadron at 0600 to begin your fly day, you need to leave the building (be off duty) by 1800 the night before. What you did in those 12 hours wasn't specifically dictated. Some guys would consider themselves "off duty" while still on the premises if they were in the squadron gym working out or other leisure activities.

I don't think FARs address mixing civilian and military flying but I've never looked since it wasn't an issue for me. Regardless, I'm pretty sure that schedule Blackhawk described didn't comply with the spirit of any 121 rest requirements. I seriously doubt there was any FAR legal rest period free from duty between flights over the course of the two days of mixed mil/civ flying he described. One can argue legalities and definitions all day, but those don't change the fact that his schedule didn't allow opportunity for rest required by both civilian and military regulations.

rickair7777
12-05-2017, 02:05 PM
I don't think FARs address mixing civilian and military flying but I've never looked since it wasn't an issue for me. Regardless, I'm pretty sure that schedule Blackhawk described didn't comply with the spirit of any 121 rest requirements. I seriously doubt there was any FAR legal rest period free from duty between flights over the course of the two days of mixed mil/civ flying he described. One can argue legalities and definitions all day, but those don't change the fact that his schedule didn't allow opportunity for rest required by both civilian and military regulations.

FARs only address 121/135 duty, what you do on your own time (including mil) doesn't count... legally.

Of course common sense must apply, and if you ball one up they're going to look real hard at what you were up to in the days prior. Documented lack of sleep opportunity would get you violated.

kme9418
12-05-2017, 05:00 PM
Legal vs. smart. 99% of the time it works every time...but the one time you have an accident/incident, you might have to explain your lack of common sense (and legal) rest. By the way, I've been on first year airline pay as a Traditional Reservist. My budget did not require me to ever go without real rest between either job in order to make ends meet.

galaxy flyer
12-05-2017, 06:48 PM
I’m pretty certain AFFSA, who wrote the reg, would say being at work is NOT rest. I’ve been at AFFSA meetings on this subject.
Short story, I was late coming off an EAL trip, called my guard unit’s guard shack and left a message that I would need to be off the early go; came in for the noon brief. Two hours later, I was in chute joining the Caterpiller Club. You just never know, best of all the board found no supervisory error to the relief on the new Wing King.

I’d follow crew rest rules scrupulously.

GF

F15andMD11
12-05-2017, 07:26 PM
Does that apply to military duty, or do you really have to be "resting"... No, you can come in and work, mission plan, etc, etc. Just no flying. I often see our cargo pilots at work looking very tired after a trip. They just crossed the big pond and then jump seated home. Up all night clearly.

Blackhawk
12-05-2017, 09:04 PM
Jeez lighten up folks.
1. I did not violate any FARs. Some of you need to read them.
2. Did not violate any Army or Guard regulations.
3. Always had plenty of rest. Never flew for the Guard if I did not. Usually had 6-7 hours sleep in a hotel plus a 3 hour nap before dutying in for Guard flying. I think 9-10 hours of sleep in a 24 hour period is more than sufficient. Far more than I ever got in my year of flying deployed when it was not uncommon to fly 14 days straight.

Adlerdriver
12-06-2017, 06:14 AM
I figured it was 50/50 on how you would respond to this. You had the option to maybe do a mea culpa and just admit maybe it wasn't the best plan after all. That would have been the end of it. The fact that you presented this schedule you designed as something to be proud of to a bunch of experienced ANG/airline pilots and got some BS flags might give a wise man reason for pause. Going counter-offensive on multiple posts is just going to further highlight that lack of SA. If this plan is detailed in your power point brief, you might want to reconsider putting it on the slide titled "Things not to do".
I did not violate any FARs. Some of you need to read them. No one accused you of violating any FARs, technically anyway. :rolleyes: Regardless, relying on technicalities and legal loopholes doesn't make your plan a good one. I guarantee, if you had an incident, the NTSB report would at a minimum have listed your schedule as a finding potentially contributing to fatigue. Take a look at the findings in the Colgan accident.

2. Did not violate any Army or Guard regulations.I'll have to take your word on that since I know nothing about Army aviation regulations. What are the Army aviation rest requirements specifically? If you were a fixed wing AF/ANG pilots you would have been in violation, by any reasonable interpretation of that reg. You came on here soliciting schedule inputs to inform mil to civ transition pilots. If you only plan to offer your advice to other Army helo pilots, then have at it, I guess.
However, since the large majority of pilots transitioning to mixing airline and military schedules are fixed wing operators flying under AF and ANG regs, you might want to at least be aware of the reg differences. That way you're not standing up in front of a bunch of fighter pilots telling them how great it would be to fly a stand-up and turn to a 4v4 sortie that afternoon. Oh yeah, and then go show for another stand-up 4 hours after the debrief is over.

Usually had 6-7 hours sleep in a hotel plus a 3 hour nap before dutying in for Guard flying. I think 9-10 hours of sleep in a 24 hour period is more than sufficient.
Anyone familiar with the NASA fatigue studies and/or first hand experience with fatigue inducing schedules knows there's a huge difference between 6 hours of sleep with a 3 hour nap hours later during non-normal sleep periods and 9 hours of proper sleep in at one time. I'd also question the 6-7 hour number you're throwing out based on the stand-up schedules I witnessed. I think you're relying on more technicalities talking about block to block time on your schedule rather than actual sleep time. When you block in at 2300 and have to show at 0500, that ain't 6 hours of sleep when you factor in transit time and the other time demands on a typical layover.

Far more than I ever got in my year of flying deployed when it was not uncommon to fly 14 days straight. Well, if those pax in the back of your RJ were instead willingly riding along in your Blackhawk on an operational mission, then that might have some bearing on the discussion. But they were paying for a safe ride from A to B by someone putting their safety as the number one priority, not optimizing their AFTP use.

Blackhawk
12-06-2017, 08:19 AM
I figured it was 50/50 on how you would respond to this. You had the option to maybe do a mea culpa and just admit maybe it wasn't the best plan after all. That would have been the end of it. The fact that you presented this schedule you designed as something to be proud of to a bunch of experienced ANG/airline pilots and got some BS flags might give a wise man reason for pause. Going counter-offensive on multiple posts is just going to further highlight that lack of SA. If this plan is detailed in your power point brief, you might want to reconsider putting it on the slide titled "Things not to do".
No one accused you of violating any FARs, technically anyway. :rolleyes: Regardless, relying on technicalities and legal loopholes doesn't make your plan a good one. I guarantee, if you had an incident, the NTSB report would at a minimum have listed your schedule as a finding potentially contributing to fatigue. Take a look at the findings in the Colgan accident.

I'll have to take your word on that since I know nothing about Army aviation regulations. What are the Army aviation rest requirements specifically? If you were a fixed wing AF/ANG pilots you would have been in violation, by any reasonable interpretation of that reg. You came on here soliciting schedule inputs to inform mil to civ transition pilots. If you only plan to offer your advice to other Army helo pilots, then have at it, I guess.
However, since the large majority of pilots transitioning to mixing airline and military schedules are fixed wing operators flying under AF and ANG regs, you might want to at least be aware of the reg differences. That way you're not standing up in front of a bunch of fighter pilots telling them how great it would be to fly a stand-up and turn to a 4v4 sortie that afternoon. Oh yeah, and then go show for another stand-up 4 hours after the debrief is over.


Anyone familiar with the NASA fatigue studies and/or first hand experience with fatigue inducing schedules knows there's a huge difference between 6 hours of sleep with a 3 hour nap hours later during non-normal sleep periods and 9 hours of proper sleep in at one time. I'd also question the 6-7 hour number you're throwing out based on the stand-up schedules I witnessed. I think you're relying on more technicalities talking about block to block time on your schedule rather than actual sleep time. When you block in at 2300 and have to show at 0500, that ain't 6 hours of sleep when you factor in transit time and the other time demands on a typical layover.

Well, if those pax in the back of your RJ were instead willingly riding along in your Blackhawk on an operational mission, then that might have some bearing on the discussion. But they were paying for a safe ride from A to B by someone putting their safety as the number one priority, not optimizing their AFTP use.
I’m sure some day, if I eat my Wheaties and work hard, I will be good enough to walk in your shadow.
:rolleyes:

Sputnik
12-06-2017, 09:06 AM
As a disinterested observer who served in both the AF and Army I will say the Army has a wildly different native attitude towards fatigue and risk assessment. Not a criticism, just reality.

Blackhawk you seem to be taking offense and I'm not sure why. Reality is if you presented that plan to a room full of folks with an AF flying background, heavy or pointy nose, you'd get a lot of weird looks. Which is why you're getting a lot of comments from folks here questioning the wisdom and/or legality of what you said you did.

I've read a lot of mishap reports, if you were involved in an AF mishap and background turned up the flying/rest schedule you described....that would make up a very large part of the report. Maybe not in the Army, can't say.

Blackhawk
12-06-2017, 09:17 AM
As a disinterested observer who served in both the AF and Army I will say the Army has a wildly different native attitude towards fatigue and risk assessment. Not a criticism, just reality.

Blackhawk you seem to be taking offense and I'm not sure why. Reality is if you presented that plan to a room full of folks with an AF flying background, heavy or pointy nose, you'd get a lot of weird looks. Which is why you're getting a lot of comments from folks here questioning the wisdom and/or legality of what you said you did.

I've read a lot of mishap reports, if you were involved in an AF mishap and background turned up the flying/rest schedule you described....that would make up a very large part of the report. Maybe not in the Army, can't say.
I guess I’m reminded why, when I worked in Special Operations, we much preferred working with Marines versus Air Force. Marines would find a way to safely accomplish a mission. The Air Force, in spite of numerous safety protocols, would still look for a way to decline a mission.
Flying 3-5 hours a day with 8-10 hours of actual sleep time; time to still go for a jog and do other stuff; 3 days on and 4-6 days off is hardly a grueling schedule and the fact that Air Force pilots view it as such indicates one of the underlying issues I had doing joint ops with them. That and being told by the Air Force that a sorty was a successful mission.:rolleyes:

Adlerdriver
12-06-2017, 10:10 AM
I’m sure some day, if I eat my Wheaties and work hard, I will be good enough to walk in your shadow.
:rolleyes: I'm hardly surprised by your responses. Now we have the typical re-direct of non-relevant counter attacks against the USAF in general - feel better? I said my piece as have others and there's obviously no point in continuing. Good luck to you.

"All men make mistakes, but only wise men learn from their mistakes."
- Winston Churchill

Blackhawk
12-06-2017, 10:57 AM
I'm hardly surprised by your responses. Now we have the typical re-direct of non-relevant counter attacks against the USAF in general - feel better? I said my piece as have others and there's obviously no point in continuing. Good luck to you.

"All men make mistakes, but only wise men learn from their mistakes."
- Winston Churchill

My opinion of the Air Force is based upon years of joint operations and numerous circumstances.
Having a squadron commander tell an Army Special Ops commander that an A/C lifting off the ground is a completed mission.
Trying to borrow a hanger at an Air Force base fo a major exercise and not being able to get any Air Force officer from the squadron Co, maintenance Co to the base CO to make a decision. It took a senior master sergeant to make the decision for us.
Having Air Force pikots tell me a major international airport is too dangerous for them to fly a C-130 into, only to be told by the Marine Reserve C-130 pilot that he puts a 757 in there on a regular basis, he can probably fit a C-130. I could go on with the personal examples I had over the years.
Again, only the Air Force would have a coniption about someone flying 3-5 hours in a day while sleeping 8-10 hours, 3 days in a row followed by at least 4 days off.

Airbum
12-06-2017, 11:41 AM
I’m sure some day, if I eat my Wheaties and work hard, I will be good enough to walk in your shadow.
:rolleyes:

Probably not Blackhawk.

I would have grounded you If you where in my squadron.

Blackhawk
12-06-2017, 03:21 PM
Probably not Blackhawk.

I would have grounded you If you where in my squadron.

Somehow I’m not surprised. As ground troops on the ground begged for support. But you would sit high on your white horse knowing you did the right thing as it went unfulfilled. Because we can’t put Air Farce pilots in a location without flush toilets and paved sidewalks.
But I guess that’s why the Army has been trying to wrestle some sort of military air back from the Department of Transportation.

Blackhawk
12-06-2017, 03:42 PM
Maybe you guys need to go find some nice McPeak uniforms while you’re at it. That way you can have the look to go with the attitude.

rickair7777
12-06-2017, 04:07 PM
Gentlemen. This is starting to sound like the regional forum.

Blackhawk
12-06-2017, 04:12 PM
Gentlemen. This is starting to sound like the regional forum.

Yes it is. People got on their high horses and began lecturing others about things which they had little to no knowledge.

Blackhawk
12-06-2017, 04:16 PM
And sorry. I should not have brought up McPeak. That was a low blow and immature on my part. 😜

Airbum
12-06-2017, 06:15 PM
Somehow I’m not surprised. As ground troops on the ground begged for support. But you would sit high on your white horse knowing you did the right thing as it went unfulfilled. Because we can’t put Air Farce pilots in a location without flush toilets and paved sidewalks.
But I guess that’s why the Army has been trying to wrestle some sort of military air back from the Department of Transportation.

Wait...... ground troops where begging for support during your FTPs completed between your airline job duty periods?

Sputnik
12-07-2017, 09:54 AM
https://thechive.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/military-memes-12_07_17-600-12.jpg?quality=85&strip=info&w=600

tomgoodman
12-07-2017, 11:12 AM
But you would sit high on your white horse....

People got on their high horses....


Ah, it was all a misunderstanding. The AF never had any horses, but the Cavalry had plenty of them. He was looking at one of his own troops. :p

Sliceback
12-07-2017, 11:29 AM
Is there a limit to how many chips you can have on one shoulder at one time?

tunes
12-10-2017, 01:53 PM
We all make choices in life, some of us just make wiser ones and pick the Air Force.

Hobbit64
12-11-2017, 11:35 AM
We all make choices in life, some of us just make wiser ones and pick the Air Force.
Haha!
Stay classy San Diego

DjgH
02-10-2018, 02:18 PM
I’m putting together a PowerPoint for military pilots thinking about transitioning to the civilian side. I have my schedule, but I wanted to show some typical schedules at various carriers, 121, 135, 91(k) for various seniority levels rather than just a very senior regional schedule. If anyone is willing can you PM me a snapshot of your schedule, minus any personal data such as names and employee numbers. If you feel comfortable include carrier (or just “legacy, LCC, ULCC, regional,135, 91(k)), and how long you’ve been there so I have a reference for them.
Also if anyone who recently made the jump wants to toss in “I wish I’d known this” things to include.
Thanks.

Did you ever make that PowerPoint? I'm active duty with only a couple years left. That would be great if I could get a copy. All my gouge comes from my reservist buddies right now.

Adlerdriver
02-11-2018, 12:25 AM
Did you ever make that PowerPoint? I'm active duty with only a couple years left. That would be great if I could get a copy. All my gouge comes from my reservist buddies right now.
Reservist buddies with airline jobs? That seems like a great source of gouge on what kind of schedules to expect. I don't think you'll find much of value here.