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View Full Version : Cold Flight Deck - A320 Family


cwingart
12-04-2017, 10:53 AM
What are pilots' experience with cold flight deck temperatures on the A320 Family of aircraft?
It's my understanding that temps can reach as low as the mid-20's (degrees Fahrenheit) around pilots' legs/feet.
How do you manage or cope with temperatures that cold? :confused:


contrails
12-04-2017, 10:59 AM
Never heard of such a thing on the Airbus. Climate control is excellent.

The plane that totally sucks for climate control both the cockpit compartment itself and especially lack of heat in the feet/rudder pedals area is the 717.

say again
12-04-2017, 11:10 AM
Mid 20's?? Where'd you get that info from? My experience has not even come close to that. A little chilly then just turn up the heat. Works great.


ShyGuy
12-04-2017, 11:12 AM
Just throw the foot warmer on


https://s7.postimg.org/tena386vv/B0_Avc_Sq_IYAERO7d.jpg

Route123
12-04-2017, 11:51 AM
Most of our planes don't have the feet warmers and on the legs above 3 hours it does get cold down there.

Sent from my SM-N920I using Tapatalk

Hrkdrivr
12-04-2017, 12:01 PM
Never heard of such a thing on the Airbus. Climate control is excellent.

The plane that totally sucks for climate control both the cockpit compartment itself and especially lack of heat in the feet/rudder pedals area is the 717.

On the 717, try the windshield defog...seems to help even down by the feet.

JustAskin
12-04-2017, 12:44 PM
Close all the vents BUT the foot OR grab a first class blanky.

Silver02ex
12-04-2017, 02:09 PM
I've only noticed it on a 4+ hrs flight. Keep my feet on the foot rest seems to help.

blizzue
12-04-2017, 02:09 PM
hasn't been an issue for me. only 220 hours on the jet though.

80ktsClamp
12-04-2017, 03:08 PM
I've been on the 320 since 2011 with a 9 month tour on the 330 earlier this year.... can't say I've ever noticed it, nor have I ever used the foot warmer.

I do use the footrests a good bit in cruise, though.

labbats
12-04-2017, 03:42 PM
If your shoes have thin soles and you keep your feet flat on the floor it may be an issue on 3+ hour flights.

Thick soles or keeping feet up on center console or footrests and no issues. I wear Eccos and never felt a thing.

kansas
12-04-2017, 05:07 PM
Froze my tail off on longer flights, especially at night. No foot warmers. Mind you I tend to chill easily, but I would be up there wearing a stocking cap and have the rheostat cranked all the way up...to no avail.

BusterBust
12-04-2017, 05:39 PM
I do use the footrests a good bit in cruise, though.

Well I hope you do, we arenít animals. Whatís next, eating food off your lap like a 737 pilot? Lol

tomgoodman
12-04-2017, 05:55 PM
The 727 only froze you on the outboard side, so frugal F/Os would bisect a sweater vertically and wear the right half, saving the left side for when they upgraded to CA. :D

badflaps
12-04-2017, 07:48 PM
The 727 only froze you on the outboard side, so frugal F/Os would bisect a sweater vertically and wear the right half, saving the left side for when they upgraded to CA. :D

Strange, but the left side has some how shrunk....:confused:

flensr
12-04-2017, 07:56 PM
A thin thermal base layer can help keep legs warm (silk or your favorite alternative) and wear warm socks. The side panels of the center console seem to have zero insulation and feel like they are below freezing, so that's what's freezing your feet, not the ventilation air. Keep the footwell air vents open. Even though that air is usually cool, it's better than having no above-freezing air circulating at all.

I personally usually move the seat back a bit and use the inboard footrest or put my left foot up by the rudder pedal adjustment lever. I wear the thickest socks that fit in my work shoes, and my feet (especially left foot) still get numbed from the cold on flights longer than about 2.5 hours.

tzskipper
12-05-2017, 06:11 AM
Counter-intuitive, but the solution is to open all of the vents (inlcuding the "eyeball" vents above and behind the captain. Turn the heat up early, as once you get behind the "cold curve", there is no coming back.

Using the open vent method, produces flight deck temps (as shown on the lower screen) in the 86 degree range.

Skip

flensr
12-05-2017, 09:51 AM
Counter-intuitive, but the solution is to open all of the vents (inlcuding the "eyeball" vents above and behind the captain. Turn the heat up early, as once you get behind the "cold curve", there is no coming back.

Using the open vent method, produces flight deck temps (as shown on the lower screen) in the 86 degree range.

Skip

I've found that even with flight deck temps up around 80, the temp down by the feet can still be near freezing due to the lack of insulation behind the panels, especially the center console. Sweating up top due to cabin temp, left foot and lower leg still frozen.

Seems like footwell heaters is an expensive way to make up for a lack of a little insulation.

In any case, the practical solution is thick socks, open up foot vents, and run the seat back so you can get feet up off the floor.

tzskipper
12-05-2017, 09:55 AM
I've found that even with flight deck temps up around 80, the temp down by the feet can still be near freezing due to the lack of insulation behind the panels, especially the center console. Sweating up top due to cabin temp, left foot and lower leg still frozen.

Seems like footwell heaters is an expensive way to make up for a lack of a little insulation.

In any case, the practical solution is thick socks, open up foot vents, and run the seat back so you can get feet up off the floor.

I agree 80 isn't enough... Again, with all vents open and staying ahead on the heat, the 84-86 degree range can be obtained and makes things tolerable. I believe the air circulation is the key. Once the ducts get cold, game over.

Skip

ShyGuy
12-05-2017, 10:26 AM
Strange, but the left side has some how shrunk....:confused:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aVTOk5p5iqo

jcountry
12-05-2017, 01:47 PM
What are pilots' experience with cold flight deck temperatures on the A320 Family of aircraft?
It's my understanding that temps can reach as low as the mid-20's (degrees Fahrenheit) around pilots' legs/feet.
How do you manage or cope with temperatures that cold? :confused:



Depends on whether you are laying Chemtrails.

The Mind Control Infuser ductwork draws from the same bleed air source. Just wait til another state or two over, and the Brain Altering Cocktail tanks will be empty and you can resume your journey in toasty comfort.

(Totally worth a little discomfort, if you ask me.... Whatever it takes to keep the useless minions placid.

SonicFlyer
12-05-2017, 03:05 PM
Isn't this what FAs are for?

:D

Al Czervik
12-05-2017, 09:34 PM
Does the 737 have cockpit climate issues?

captjns
12-06-2017, 05:41 AM
Does the 737 have cockpit climate issues?

No... the -700 is perfectly cold after 4 hours at FL400. Icebergs forming in my coffee about an hour later with total freeze over an hour after that.:(

The good news is during daytime operations, the heat of the sun keeps the temperature just right.

You get a wee better extra warmth with the -800 and even more with the -900 (non ER with 26k motors) since they can’t get above FL340 or FL350 fully with ISA +10 to +15

cwingart
12-06-2017, 07:58 AM
Mid 20's?? Where'd you get that info from? My experience has not even come close to that. A little chilly then just turn up the heat. Works great.

A close friend of mine is an engineer at a major airline & they performed a study in which they took temperature readings at regular intervals over the course of 50+ hours on transcontinental flights. During each flight, they recorded temps of mid 20ís to mid 30ís in multiple locations around the cockpit. In line with posts by the commenters on this thread, the coldest readings were observed after about 2.5 hours of flight at the pilots legs/feet. Makes for an uncomfortable contrast of temps between upper body/lower body.

Just wondering what, if anything, pilots are doing to cope with these temps for hours at a time?

Fred Flintstone
12-06-2017, 08:39 AM
Airflow is the only way to get heat up front, so closing the vents is not the way to go. Open them up, especially the two in the overhead panel which should be pointed toward the door. That's where the temp sensor is, behind you.

Take the left temp knob and crank it up. VX added insulation in the foot wells which helped, but keep your thin sole shoes off the metal wear strips.

Wearing tight shoes & socks restricts blood flow to your feet & lower legs, so fashion be damned, wear loose socks and loosen your laces. If you suffer foot sweat, try powder and/or gross out the other guy by changing your socks if you are cold.

Close off air & blood circulation and you might as well stick your feet on the rear windowsills next to the water bottles.

13 years in the bus, my $0.02 worth!

badflaps
12-06-2017, 10:42 AM
Do they make black plain toed UGGs?

tomgoodman
12-06-2017, 12:44 PM
Do they make black plain toed UGGs?

Get a pair of these walrushoppers:

https://winterboots.com/assets/components/phpthumbof/cache/Endurance_POLA-M005_BK1%20with%20cuff.d49dee615ddf1655f5c394d6692 1b6d1.jpg

Big E 757
12-06-2017, 06:06 PM
A close friend of mine is an engineer at a major airline & they performed a study in which they took temperature readings at regular intervals over the course of 50+ hours on transcontinental flights. During each flight, they recorded temps of mid 20ís to mid 30ís in multiple locations around the cockpit. In line with posts by the commenters on this thread, the coldest readings were observed after about 2.5 hours of flight at the pilots legs/feet. Makes for an uncomfortable contrast of temps between upper body/lower body.

Just wondering what, if anything, pilots are doing to cope with these temps for hours at a time?

I read something a few years ago. It was a study of people who sat for prolonged periods of time. It was directed at office workers but it applies to us too. The study had some people stand up every 20-30 minutes for 30 seconds to 1 minute. The people who got up and stood, even if for just a short time, had lower blood pressure and lower cholesterol, on average than the people who stayed seated for hours at a time, not to mention the decreased risk of DVTís and other blood clots.

Whenever Iím flying a 2+ hour flight, I get up every hour while at cruise and stand for a few minutes. Of course, jumpseater can make this impossible occasionally, but when I can, I do.

Next time your feet are getting icy, stand up for a minute or two, or set up a bathroom break, just to get the blood flowing a little better. Your health and medical certificate might thank you one day. Do a few knee bends or stretch your hamstrings a little. Iíve found my FOís donít like me doing squat thrusts on the center console but if you keep it within reason, itís good for you.

YXnot
12-07-2017, 08:01 AM
Another vote for keeping the vents, all of them, wide open throughout. Plus plan to stay ahead of the curve if possible. I think some of our ships have had insulation placed in the area just behind the pedals which also seems to help. I will take the bus any day over the 73.

Std Deviation
12-07-2017, 01:37 PM
B6 didnít buy the foot warmer option. On red eye transcons I bring a Snuggie. Leaves the arms free so when the radio wakes you up you can still manipulate the autopilot:cool:

qball
12-07-2017, 01:43 PM
Many of the DAL 320s are over 20 years old. We put a thermometer at the rudder pedals with the cockpit temp cranked as high as it would go. The temp at the rudder pedals was about 50 degrees. After a few hours of that your feet will be very cold. There is a blank switch area just below the PFD/ND dials that I'm told was the electric floor heat option that we did not order. Don't know if other 320s have that option installed. At least with all the vents open on our older planes the cockpit db is almost 90. Just as loud at the gate as it is in cruise.

EMBFlyer
12-08-2017, 12:44 PM
The old Braniff A320s (2-digit serial numbers with A1 engines) had switches for floor heaters. Of the 3 or 4 I flew, I don't think they did anything. Toward the end they were relegated to short routes and at the very end, they were sent to CLT to shuttle back and forth to Florida...which made perfect sense because they had the absolute worst air conditioning.

Al Czervik
12-10-2017, 03:02 AM
Many of the DAL 320s are over 20 years old. We put a thermometer at the rudder pedals with the cockpit temp cranked as high as it would go. The temp at the rudder pedals was about 50 degrees. After a few hours of that your feet will be very cold. There is a blank switch area just below the PFD/ND dials that I'm told was the electric floor heat option that we did not order. Don't know if other 320s have that option installed. At least with all the vents open on our older planes the cockpit db is almost 90. Just as loud at the gate as it is in cruise.

Flew a plane with the fans inop. It was as quiet as an MD80 cockpit.

Master of FiFi
12-10-2017, 06:43 AM
Flew a plane with the fans inop. It was as quiet as an MD80 cockpit.

The MEL for the fans say they can be inop if the packs are running. We should be allowed to turn them off once the bleed air is turned on so we can brief without yelling. Just saying.

Ar Pilot
12-10-2017, 02:35 PM
ITT we have Airbus pilots complaining about cockpit noise. -Signed, a deaf 737 pilot.

Al Czervik
12-11-2017, 04:53 AM
ITT we have Airbus pilots complaining about cockpit noise. -Signed, a deaf 737 pilot.

I think Iím going deaf flying the bus. I believe the 737 guys who wear headsets do better long term.

Master of FiFi
12-11-2017, 08:07 AM
I think Iím going deaf flying the bus. I believe the 737 guys who wear headsets do better long term.

I went back to using noise canceling on the bus. I noticed when using the minitel once I got to the hotel at night that it took quite a long time for me to stop hearing static and residual wind noise. With noise canceling I don't have that problem any more. While it is a "quiet" cockpit, I don't think it is quiet enough to not use ear protection.



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