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View Full Version : FAA to EASA conversion


Yfe330
12-06-2017, 03:15 AM
Hi all.

My apologies if this topic is covered in another area. Any recommendations for FAA to EASA conversion. I work overseas as Captain. Any help or suggestions are appreciated.


pilot0987
12-06-2017, 04:25 AM
Yes use the search function

captjns
12-06-2017, 05:22 AM
Hi all.

My apologies if this topic is covered in another area. Any recommendations for FAA to EASA conversion. I work overseas as Captain. Any help or suggestions are appreciated.

I can only comment on Ireland.

You will have to sit for the 14 written exams. You will have 18 months from the time you sit for the first exam to complete all 14. Bristol or Oxford Aviation offer distance learning programs. It was all self study.

Back in the day, some 12 years ago it was about 110 euro for each exam. I don’t remember the cost of the study materials. No matter as I’m sure the cost has gone up. Also, not all 14 exams were not offered during each sitting.

I took all of my paperwork, exam results, validation, certificate from Oxford, LPC, and medical to the IAA. A couple of days later, got a call from the IAA to collect my license.

Both training organizations can counsel you the best course to take based on the country validation is applicable. They can tell you locations and dates of sittings too. Good luck... well worth the effort as it opens more opportunities world wide.


captjns
12-06-2017, 06:19 AM
Perhaps this thread is more applicable in the “Foreign” forum. Pilots overseas, working on validations, are seeking information on how to obtain a license in the country they are flying.

Many look at the “Flight Schools and Training” mainly for new entrants to the industry.

Thanks... captjns

zondaracer
12-06-2017, 07:35 AM
I did the conversion in the UK. You will also have to sit all 14 exams, and max three sittings. All exams are offered in the same sitting but it is a lot of testing. I have seen people do it before. Since you hold an ATPL in another country, you can self certify for the exams. You will also have to do a flight test, which can be done in the sim on the type that you are currently flying if you have 500 hours on type. Sittings for exams are typically held once a month, and they have different locations. The medical exam has to be done at Gatwick for the initial, but they accept initial class 1 medical exams from other EASA countries with some paperwork and a fee.

NEDude
12-06-2017, 07:59 AM
I used Bristol Ground School for self study, but supplemented it with a question bank.

I finished the conversion process about 18 months ago and everything others have said is accurate.

A few other points you should be aware of:

The initial medical exam must be done at the official CAA medical centre(s). Subsequent medicals can be done through private AMEs similar to the FAA. The country in which you do the initial medical exam will be the country which issues your ATPL. The 14 exams can be done in any country, but they must be all done in one country. In other words you cannot do 7 in the U.K. and 7 in Ireland. But you can officially transfer the results from one country, to the country which holds you medical records. I did the exams through the U.K. but medical and license issue through Denmark.

Officially any EASA approved examiner can do your ATPL skills test, but if they are certified through a different country than the one that will issue your license, there must be a pre-approval of the examiner. The pre-approval usually only takes a few days, and it is really just a matter of the examiner registering on the other nations CAA site to view any differences in requirements and get a copy of the paperwork. Now be aware that "officially" does not mean it will always be smooth. The southern European countries, Spain in particular, are notoriously difficult to work with and getting approval for a TRE from another country can be at times impossible.

The last big thing you need to be aware of is that although it may not always be listed, many CAAs require a radiotelephony license as well. And no, the FCC license will not work. This often requires a separate radio theory exam on top of the 14 ATPL exams. The U.K. is one of the countries which have this requirement. Ireland does not have the radio license requirement.

The U.K. has the most experience and best defined process for for the conversion, however they can be a bit more on the expensive side. Ireland has a very good reputation for being easy to work with. I have heard the Icelandic CAA is also very easy to work with. Denmark is also easy, but expensive. Again, the southern European countries can be cheap, but notoriously difficult.

Oh, and if you go through Germany, be aware that German privacy laws prohibit the sharing of medical information. What that means is if you have a German license and need to change your state of license issue to another country, it will be difficult. Any EASA license can operate any EASA registry, so in most cases it will not matter. But there are a few airlines which require you to change your license over to their country to make the LPC paperwork easier. EasyJet is one such airline.

Feel free to ask if you have more questions.

Denti
12-06-2017, 10:46 AM
Oh, and if you go through Germany, be aware that German privacy laws prohibit the sharing of medical information. What that means is if you have a German license and need to change your state of license issue to another country, it will be difficult. Any EASA license can operate any EASA registry, so in most cases it will not matter. But there are a few airlines which require you to change your license over to their country to make the LPC paperwork easier. EasyJet is one such airline.

Feel free to ask if you have more questions.

Germany to UK CAA is currently not possible for pilots that had their license in germany for quite some time. For new licenses it should work in theory. Reason is that the CAA requires a complete medical history of the last five years, which the LBA can't provide as it doesn't have the data. Providing the history yourself is not accepted by the CAA. Rules have changed though and most if not all of the medical data is now transfered to the LBA (german CAA) with newer medicals as far as i know.

However, the german CAA scored second to last one on a test of how well they follow EASA rules done by EASA, just before Greece. Not a good CAA to work with.

Anyway, Easyjet is just in the process of hiring about 330 german license holders without the requirement to change them to UK ones, and will employ all mainland europe pilots (except switzerland of course) in an european AOC anyway as the UK one will not fall under EASA regulations anymore post-BREXIT.

Varsity
12-06-2017, 12:53 PM
I have heard Poland is the cheapest/easiest place to do it. True?

NEDude
12-06-2017, 08:44 PM
I have heard Poland is the cheapest/easiest place to do it. True?

The theory exams are quite cheap in Poland. I had looked into doing it through there but if my memory is correct (which it may not be), the Polish authorities required you to work through an ATO regardless of experience level. I had been working with a Polish ATO, but before I got too far into the process, the ATO I was working with decided they were no longer going to assist with conversions.

thomaskies
12-08-2017, 06:08 AM
as the UK one will not fall under EASA regulations anymore post-BREXIT.

Says who exactly?

NEDude
12-08-2017, 06:41 AM
Says who exactly?

Certainly not the U.K. government:

https://news.sky.com/story/govt-to-stay-in-eu-air-safety-body-in-blurring-of-brexit-red-line-11151049

VHDSJ
12-08-2017, 01:39 PM
I did the conversion in the UK. You will also have to sit all 14 exams, and max three sittings.

I see the 14 exams are grouped in to 3 modules. So if you sat for the exams in their module group as you complete each module, that will take three sittings, right? In which case you can not afford to fail even one? Have I got this right?

zondaracer
12-08-2017, 02:38 PM
I see the 14 exams are grouped in to 3 modules. So if you sat for the exams in their module group as you complete each module, that will take three sittings, right? In which case you can not afford to fail even one? Have I got this right?

Correct. Bristol ground school had grouped the exams into two modules and two exam sittings. That way you could afford a failure.

NEDude
12-08-2017, 09:20 PM
The exams may be completed over six sessions, not three. From the U.K. CAA website:

"EASA regulations state that all theoretical knowledge exams for a particular licence must be completed in six exam sessions. In the case of CPL, IR and ATPL exams, this means completing them within six attendances at CAA exam centres."

The maximum of three sittings refers to the number of re-takes you may have with each subject.

Here is the CAA website for your own verification:

https://www.caa.co.uk/General-aviation/Pilot-licences/EASA-requirements/General/Theoretical-knowledge-examinations/

NEDude
12-08-2017, 09:55 PM
Basically for the U.K. you will need to complete form SRG1192 and send that in via email to: [email protected] You will also need to set up an account through the customer portal at: https://portal.caa.co.uk/. It should only take a few days from sending in form SRG1192 and you will be granted access to the online booking system through the customer portal. After that you can book and pay for your exams directly through the CAA.

jstanotherpilot
12-09-2017, 10:05 AM
Hi all.

My apologies if this topic is covered in another area. Any recommendations for FAA to EASA conversion. I work overseas as Captain. Any help or suggestions are appreciated.

A couple months ago I researched this a little and came up with the following.

In the U.S. right now there are few schools that to FAA to EASA conversion. It's a pretty extense process that involves getting EASA medical, passing the 14 written exams, check rides, etc.

If you are already a Captain I assume you have an ATP which qualifies you for a shorter process. But still, all in all, it would take about 1-2 years of dedicated time and study to fully get your EASA license I believe.

With Norwegian recently entering the U.S. market, the US pilots being hired into Norwegian are required within I believe it's 2 years to get their EASA license. Of course, Norwegian provides the means and materials to do this but they utilize a school in Florida, that school is Gulf Coast Training Solutions.

Right now it would seem that Gulf Coast is your best bet if you're an FAA ATP US pilot looking for a EASA ATP.

This is the email that I received from Gulf Coast a couple months ago when I was researching all this, it pretty much explains the process.

Thank you for your inquiry regarding converting your license into an EASA license. The process to convert can be completed in just a few simple steps which I will explain in some detail:

Step 1: Pass 14 Written Exams

The first step in all cases is to pass the EASA written examinations. Our course divides those subjects into 3 phases with the subjects split 5/6/3. While there is no set study time required, in most cases it can be expected to take from 5-8 months of studying for the full course. The amount of work that an individual puts in will reflect the timeline. Please note, once you first sit an exam you then have 18 months from that date to pass all 14 subjects.

With our course you will receive:
Full color course notes for the subjects in electronic format with the option to upgrade to black and white paper manuals
Free access to our App- designed to mirror our online learning center, compatible with both the Ipad and Ipad mini, no internet connection required
Approved Flight computer and Jeppesen Student Pilot Route Manual
Access to the online classroom where there are more than 10,000 questions, most of which you will see in the actual exams
Support from EASA approved instructors
A total of 70 hours in class at our facility in the Pre-Exam course to make sure you are ready for the final exams. The time is split across the subjects.

Here is where the hours and ratings come in. If you have an ATP with 500 hours on type Multi-Crew, we can exempt you from the Pre-exam course section of the program. However we do still recommend you attend as it is a valuable resource at your disposal.

The cost of the course is $2450 and you choose whether to receive the 14 manuals in bound paper books or fully searchable USB Memory stick. Both contain the same material, but it depends upon your preference.

Step 2: Pass an EASA Class 1 Medical

This step must be completed in Europe for the initial issue and then may be renewed in the USA.

Step 3: Type Rating Training Organization

Pass an EASA check ride at an EASA TRTO (Type Rating Training Organization) in the simulator for the aircraft on which you have more than 500 hours and pass an EASA check ride. When you get to this step, we can assist you in selecting a TRTO.

Upon completion you will receive a full ATPL issued by the authorities with an EASA PIC type rating attached to your license.

I hope this has answered your questions. Should you have any other questions/concerns please do not hesitate to contact me, or if you are ready to get started please follow this link to enroll. http://www.easalicense.com/courses/

Thank you,


You mentioned you're already flying overseas, would this be in a gulf carrier?

The EASA conversion is a great option to apply at European airlines but you usually have to have citizenship or legal right to work in Europe or any country for the airline you're looking to apply.

In my case I have US and Italian citizenship so it was definitely an option for me.

Hope this info helps out!

ME109G
12-09-2017, 01:24 PM
Does this EASA license come with a PhD attached to it? I really hope they know how to fly.

Javichu
12-10-2017, 01:15 AM
Yes we know how to fly thanks.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

zondaracer
12-10-2017, 04:20 AM
The exams may be completed over six sessions, not three. From the U.K. CAA website:

"EASA regulations state that all theoretical knowledge exams for a particular licence must be completed in six exam sessions. In the case of CPL, IR and ATPL exams, this means completing them within six attendances at CAA exam centres."

The maximum of three sittings refers to the number of re-takes you may have with each subject.

Here is the CAA website for your own verification:

https://www.caa.co.uk/General-aviation/Pilot-licences/EASA-requirements/General/Theoretical-knowledge-examinations/
That’s a positive change, in my opinion. Three sessions was a bit extreme.

captjns
12-11-2017, 05:30 AM
Does this EASA license come with a PhD attached to it?

No PhD. The EASA license has opened additional doors overseas and, yes in the U.S. too.

I really hope they know how to fly.

Um yeah... I sure they hope you know how to fly too... especially when operating in the same skies as you:rolleyes:

ME109G
12-13-2017, 12:42 PM
No PhD. The EASA license has opened additional doors overseas and, yes in the U.S. too.



Um yeah... I sure they hope you know how to fly too... especially when operating in the same skies as you:rolleyes:



I keep forgetting US pilots are not as pilots and machos as European ones. Thanks God for Scarebus that it came with a plane which doesn’t need pilots and keep calling them “ Retard, Retard”.

goinaround
12-14-2017, 04:45 PM
I keep forgetting US pilots are not as pilots and machos as European ones. Thanks God for Scarebus that it came with a plane which doesn’t need pilots and keep calling them “ Retard, Retard”.

Say what now?

ME109G
12-15-2017, 12:44 PM
Say what now?

No worries. It was supposed to be a joke.

NEDude
12-19-2017, 03:48 AM
A couple months ago I researched this a little and came up with the following.

In the U.S. right now there are few schools that to FAA to EASA conversion. It's a pretty extense process that involves getting EASA medical, passing the 14 written exams, check rides, etc.

If you are already a Captain I assume you have an ATP which qualifies you for a shorter process. But still, all in all, it would take about 1-2 years of dedicated time and study to fully get your EASA license I believe.

With Norwegian recently entering the U.S. market, the US pilots being hired into Norwegian are required within I believe it's 2 years to get their EASA license. Of course, Norwegian provides the means and materials to do this but they utilize a school in Florida, that school is Gulf Coast Training Solutions.

Right now it would seem that Gulf Coast is your best bet if you're an FAA ATP US pilot looking for a EASA ATP.

This is the email that I received from Gulf Coast a couple months ago when I was researching all this, it pretty much explains the process.



You mentioned you're already flying overseas, would this be in a gulf carrier?

The EASA conversion is a great option to apply at European airlines but you usually have to have citizenship or legal right to work in Europe or any country for the airline you're looking to apply.

In my case I have US and Italian citizenship so it was definitely an option for me.

Hope this info helps out!

It appears Gulf Coast Training Solutions has gone out of business.