Airline Pilot Forums

Airline Pilot Forums was designed to be a community where working airline pilots can share ideas and information about the aviation field. In the forum you will find information about major and regional airline carriers, career training, interview and job seeker help, finance, and living the airline pilot lifestyle.




Texasang99
12-10-2017, 07:38 PM
Hello,

I'm eligible to retire from the AF in just under 2 years and looking for some advice. I have just over 3500 manned flight hours in the C-5 and T-6, but I have been flying UAVs the past 7 years. I will still be in UAVs my last year and a half of service. My last USAF manned flight was in 2010. I have my ATP already.

My question is with that large break in manned flying, how competitive am I for a job at a major airline? I have started doing some private flying on my own in small single-engine planes just to regain some recency. Will this be beneficial at all? Will I likely need to fly for a regional for a couple of years before I am competitive? I'm not above flying for a regional by any means, but being hired by a major immediately after I retire would obviously be ideal if possible.

Any advice for a newbie here would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.


Otterbox
12-10-2017, 07:56 PM
Hello,

I'm eligible to retire from the AF in just under 2 years and looking for some advice. I have just over 3500 manned flight hours in the C-5 and T-6, but I have been flying UAVs the past 7 years. I will still be in UAVs my last year and a half of service. My last USAF manned flight was in 2010. I have my ATP already.

My question is with that large break in manned flying, how competitive am I for a job at a major airline? I have started doing some private flying on my own in small single-engine planes just to regain some recency. Will this be beneficial at all? Will I likely need to fly for a regional for a couple of years before I am competitive? I'm not above flying for a regional by any means, but being hired by a major immediately after I retire would obviously be ideal if possible.

Any advice for a newbie here would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

You’re not competitive at the moment due to such a massive gap in flying employment.

Private flying won’t really help for a major since it’s not an employed flying position. It will at least allow you to be instrument current and fligh current for regionals et al.

You’ll likely need some sort of flying employment (regional would probably be best given the gap) but only for about 100-200hrs before you start being competitive, Depending on your military hours.

Texasang99
12-11-2017, 04:48 AM
Copy all. Thanks for the info


rickair7777
12-11-2017, 06:14 AM
You're in the same boat as folks who've been on staff for X number of years. There are several threads about that on APC, but general consensus is a regional for a year or two, maybe even less.

PerfInit
12-11-2017, 06:18 AM
Your military F/W time is “golden” and even though you have not flown in a while, If I were in your shoes, I would apply to every Legacy airline and LCC out there. I have personally heard of several recently “hired” folks with similar quals. Don’t let one poster’s opinion deter you from applying. Let the selection process play out. There has never been a better time to put your name in the hat.

155mm
12-11-2017, 06:22 AM
My question is with that large break in manned flying, how competitive am I for a job at a major airline?

First of all, you are not a "UAV pilot" you are an Air Force pilot approaching retirement that has 3500 total time an ATP, flew heavy C-5's and finished a career/assignment flying UAV's. That's freaking outstanding! I've flown with retired military pilots that flew a desk the last four years of their career and they got hired! Don't be discouraged! Keep flying whatever, wherever and you will get an interview. If you have to go to a regional for a year, its not a curse! Good luck!

rickair7777
12-11-2017, 06:27 AM
If you have to go to a regional for a year, its not a curse! Good luck!

Better that than to flunk out of training at a legacy because you're way not-current.

Many regionals have programs designed to spoon-feed a type rating to piston ASEL CFI's.

Most majors have grown-up oriented programs which assume you're current and already know some things about 121.

155mm
12-11-2017, 06:58 AM
Better that than to flunk out of training at a legacy because you're way not-current.



This gentleman flew C-5's not C-150's. I don't think he'll have a problem getting through training, the challenge as for everyone is getting interviews! Apparently, the Regionals are looking more for "qualified" applicants and not necessarily recency of experience. Whereas the majors are looking for the whole package but that will probably change soon as well. I sat as a flight engineer for many years and it all came back quick. It's not rocket science!

rickair7777
12-11-2017, 07:07 AM
Are you implying there is a different standard for the Regionals?


That's a different conversation.

Many regionals today go above and beyond the FAA minimum training footprint to get people through. In the past they had the luxury of hiring only people with enough experience and natural aptitude to get by on the minimums.

Many of those folks are fine pilots once they overcome their inexperience or slow learning. Some probably are not.

Texasang99
12-11-2017, 07:15 AM
I appreciate all of the information guys. It’s very helpful. Thanks

BeatNavy
12-11-2017, 09:55 AM
JetBlue’s regency requirement is 200 hours in the last 12 months and is pretty firm. Can’t speak for any other airlines. But regional pay/bonuses are pretty decent these days. No different (in some cases better) than year 1 pay at majors used to be. Throw in O5 (or whatever) retirement and you should make livable wages at a regional. Your stay at the regionals will likely be short. Months, I’d guess.

Hacker15e
12-11-2017, 10:16 AM
I appreciate all of the information guys. It’s very helpful. Thanks

Don't be gunshy of going to the regionals for re-currency.

Good discussion from Albie:
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/99532-getting-back-into-game.html

As I cruise into my 50s, it has been interesting to see where my peers and fellow warriors have gone along the way. I’ve lost a few fellow warriors to disease, a few to accidents, and a few to combat along the way. What is fun, however, is seeing a few of my old superiors, contemporaries, and subordinates migrate over to the airline side of the fence after serving their country for 20 to 30 years.

Many of these folks either made plans to transition at some point or at the last minute saw the opportunity for solid second career and made it happen. This article is not for them. This article is for that retiring officer who never really considered the airline gig and made other plans, and is now perhaps having second thoughts on that decision.

First, let me start off by saying I understand how getting offered a six figure salary to run a company or program or do something that seems more “tactical” than flying passengers or boxes from point A to B might be enticing. I’ve had friends and contemporaries offered positions in the oil business, defense contracting, real estate development, software, and host of other fields. Nobody wants to “start over” in their 40s at the bottom of anything, and the idea of leveraging those leadership and decision making skills you’ve honed over two decades is often very appealing. However—when I watch friends dive into the business world, I cannot help but remember Forrest Gump observation after he returned to Alabama after the Vietnam War to chase his friend Bubba’s vision of a shrimping business: “Shrimping is HARD....” Guess what—business is HARD, and sometimes plans don’t go as expected. Many guys are finding out the business world isn’t so much fun, right about the time they realize they haven’t flown any iron the last couple of years.

At some point, every pilot who leaves the military jumps off a financial cliff and takes a pay cut for a period of time. In the early1990s and early 2000s, the first year pay at airline was tough for a captain or major leaving active duty. For a retiring Colonel, it was a tremendous step down. The appeal of migrating over to a 100-150k DoD or business job vice a 50k airline first year salary was obvious. The cut in pay might last for three to five years or more. The industry has changed, however. With the current contracts at most legacies and FDX, SWA, and UPS...second year pay often approaches what many of these non-flying leadership positions offered. Even more importantly, the amount of work and stress is incredibly lower. The upside potential is also higher than in recent years. An FO can make 175-200k at many companies while a captain at a legacy or FedEx may make 250-400k a year. The financial penalty for the leap is much less severe these days.

So—for those of you now taking a second look at this industry, I’ll offer a few suggestions and pointers.

Currency is a problem for many of you. During some of my “Ask Albie Anything” Conference Calls, I’ve had Charle Venema on as a guest. Charlie was the head of hiring at UAL for several years, and will identify himself as “...the SOB who came up with the requirement for 100 hours in the last year....” He goes on to describe how when UAL starting recalling guys who had been our of the cockpit for several years, they saw many of them—previously qualified airline pilots—struggle after the layoff. Because they were already employees, they gave them extra training and they bounced back. The issue is if a new hire had the same kind of struggles, they would have most likely been fired or asked to resign. Charlie never wanted to put the “death mark” on a pilot’s future application by firing him, so they looked for pilots who were current. It wasn’t out of malice—it was to the protect the pilot.

So—Colonel—what do you do when its been 2, 3, or more years since you’ve flown?

When my old friends reach out to me for advice, they usually have two possible solutions:

1. I’m gonna go get my 737 type/ATP to requal....
2. I’m going to go fly a bunch of General Aviation....

The issue with option 1 is it is good, but it still might not be enough. Maybe the head guru at SWA says he’ll interview you, but even if he does you have to pass the interview and you will be at SWA where you will be an FO until you are in your late 50s. If you want SWA...and are happy with that...maybe that angle is enough. The cost of that ATP/Type, however, is on you.

Option 2 often just isn’t enough. GA is cool...but it doesn’t always seem to count much at the majors. They want quality time...and single engine piston time is better than nothing but it doesn’t carry much weight.

So....let me offer option 3. Going to a regional airline for a stint can help you in many ways. First, it gets you qualified again, with an ATP, at no cost to you. Second, the training is usually built around someone coming to their first jet, vice the experience assumed when you show up in training at a major. Some Fighter pilots struggle in their first 121 training at a major if they go direct from active duty. Its not insurmountable, but there are enough differences to create some challenges—including crosswind landings and crew coordination. The regional’s training is built for first timers, and is often better and more complete training than you get at the majors. It won’t hurt you to do this once before you show up at Delta or FedEx. Finally—there is “baggage” with hiring a retired O-6. The unspoken (or articulated) question will be “are you going to be okay being the FO and learning a new gig without being the man for a while?” Most retiring officers do great at this—but a handful don’t. Six to twelve months in the regionals answers the question before its even asked, and indicates you are ready and willing to dive into your new role without drama.

The question I often get is “will the regionals even hire me if I they think I will leave? “ The answer at least for now is a resounding “yes”. The regionals need quality pilots, and they know you will be solid. They’ll amortize their training costs if they get to keep you for even a year or less. Additionally, there is always the chance maybe you’ll like it and stay—and anchor there vice moving on. Case in point—a few years ago I had a retired PAS from Utah go to Skywest. He was perfectly content if nobody ever called to drive to work at SLC and be an RJ captain for 100k a year. His family had non-rev benefits on not only Delta but United, and he liked the people he worked with every day. It would have been a good, low-stress gig for a retired Colonel. Delta came along, however and plucked him up. This was in 2011/12, when things were not nearly as tight as they are now. One old friend went to work for ASA/Expressjet out of Atlanta after a flying layoff of about 8 years. Less than 10 months later he got hired and is now a 777 FO for FedEx. He will probably make about 200k his second year on the job.

So—what is the biggest barrier (http://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=aps&keywords=barrier&linkCode=ur2) to retiring officers doing this? Money and ego are the biggest issues I see.

For money—here’s my take. In 2-3 years you’ll be at parity or better if you make this leap. The longer you wait, the more money on the back end you leave on the table. There is never an easy time to jump. So—jump now and get on with it and you will be closer to getting the dollars back. Grab a W-2 from a friend at the airline and take a look. I don’t know a single DoD project manager or simulator instructor that makes half of what I made last year as a captain. I also bet I have a lot more free time and a lot less stress.

Second—realize that the airline job is a noble profession. We need good people to come over who take pride in doing the job right. The US population doesn’t travel by rail or ferry for most of interstate travel—we fly. We are an aerospace nation. By taking your skills into this market you are continuing our dominance of all things aviation, and you can have pride in being part of that legacy. Additionally, if you still want to shape policy or contribute in the DoD world you can—part time. I have flown with F-22 and F-35 system gurus and experts that did that in their off time when not flying for an airline. The beauty is they they were now getting paid airline dollars and accruing airline seniority while they still helped their nation. Its not a “this or that” decision when you become an airline pilot, but it can be a “this AND that....” if you don’t mind the extra work.

So—if this note gets to you and you want to chat—give me a call. I sell interview prep, but bull****ting about life and this industry is always free. I seem to be doing a lot of that lately with some retired warriors, and if I can help you get some focus please feel free to reach out

Plus other discussions on the matter:

https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/99744-staff-guy-regionals.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/100171-how-do-majors-view-retiring-staffers.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/career-questions/108866-retiring-colonel-wwyd-2.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/108054-take-afs-second-bonus-get-recency.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/career-questions/107940-military-regional.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/102921-rusty-military-pilot-considering-applying.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/96198-seperated-military-pilot-non-current.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/96206-majors-hire-non-current-military-pilots.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/94890-getting-back-saddle.html

tunes
12-11-2017, 11:01 AM
Don't be gunshy of going to the regionals for re-currency.

Good discussion from Albie:
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/99532-getting-back-into-game.html



Plus other discussions on the matter:

https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/99744-staff-guy-regionals.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/100171-how-do-majors-view-retiring-staffers.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/career-questions/108866-retiring-colonel-wwyd-2.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/108054-take-afs-second-bonus-get-recency.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/career-questions/107940-military-regional.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/102921-rusty-military-pilot-considering-applying.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/96198-seperated-military-pilot-non-current.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/96206-majors-hire-non-current-military-pilots.html
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/94890-getting-back-saddle.html
i second that. I separated way early with the voluntary separation programs so I was very low time but still had my ATP. Talked with Albie if it would be better for me to do contract work or suck it up and go to a regional. He said suck it up and do the regional. As soon as I hit 110 hours at the regional I got the call to interview at a major. I started at a major almost a year before my peers that went and did the contract gig for the paycheck. I know our applications aren't comparing apples to apples but I found it to be pretty consistent.

rickair7777
12-11-2017, 11:22 AM
This gentleman flew C-5's not C-150's. I don't think he'll have a problem getting through training, the challenge as for everyone is getting interviews! Apparently, the Regionals are looking more for "qualified" applicants and not necessarily recency of experience. Whereas the majors are looking for the whole package but that will probably change soon as well. I sat as a flight engineer for many years and it all came back quick. It's not rocket science!

Someone who has been out of the cockpit for many years is going to be paddling really hard at any major airline training. UAVs will help just a tiny bit. Pilot skills are very perishable, to say nothing of having to learn all the 121 stuff on top of learning a new jet, while learning how to fly again. I took a year off once, that was eye opening.

Not saying it can't be done, but there's a reason the majors like turbine recency.

155mm
12-11-2017, 12:10 PM
Someone who has been out of the cockpit for many years is going to be paddling really hard at any major airline training. UAVs will help just a tiny bit. Pilot skills are very perishable, to say nothing of having to learn all the 121 stuff on top of learning a new jet, while learning how to fly again. I took a year off once, that was eye opening.

Not saying it can't be done, but there's a reason the majors like turbine recency.

First of all, I have no doubt this individual will do well at any airline program. Where he will struggle is flying 135 single pilot freight in a steam engine in the Rocky Mountains in a blizzard landing on a sheet of ice in blowing snow and breaking action nil. Before the AQP days I would have agreed with you. AQP training in a highly automated glass aircraft is a joke and is designed to get monkeys a type rating! The greatest challenge is getting the interview and getting hired. Hell, I've heard stories of really bizarre interview scenarios but that's, "a different conversation".

rickair7777
12-11-2017, 02:30 PM
First of all, I have no doubt this individual will do well at any airline program. Where he will struggle is flying 135 single pilot freight in a steam engine in the Rocky Mountains in a blizzard landing on a sheet of ice in blowing snow and breaking action nil. Before the AQP days I would have agreed with you. AQP training in a highly automated glass aircraft is a joke and is designed to get monkeys a type rating! The greatest challenge is getting the interview and getting hired. Hell, I've heard stories of really bizarre interview scenarios but that's, "a different conversation".

Have you done airline training/re-training after extensive time away? It's amazing the things you lose, which we take for granted as aviators.

155mm
12-11-2017, 04:11 PM
Have you done airline training/re-training after extensive time away? It's amazing the things you lose, which we take for granted as aviators.

Being proficient is more than currency. I've flown with "current" pilots that log over a 1000 hours a year and are brain dead and absolutely suck eggs! I've also flown with 250 hour pilots that would make your eyes water. Most airlines have eliminated the simulator ride as part of the interview process which in my opinion is a big mistake. Pilots are obviously receiving the interview prep that makes them shine for that big day but you can't fundamentally change who they really are.

In regards, to your inquiry about extensive time away? Yes, I previously stated I was a flight engineer (plumber) for a few years. I had no currency. I believe conceptions/misconceptions about UAV pilots are similar to that of a flight engineer or a simulator instructor. They have no currency flying "real airplanes" but I don't believe this correlates to proficiency! Where is the evidence that UAV pilots, especially those who are rated aircraft pilots with thousands of hours of actual flight time lose their proficiency? You state "UAV pilot will help just a tiny bit". Do you have evidence to show that UAV pilot skills help at all or is it an assumption?

I've flown with pilots that had UAV assignments and they were fine. That's the only evidence I have and it is anecdotal. I've also flown with simulator instructors that hadn't flown a real airplane for years and they were highly proficient although not current and yet a 1000 hour XYZ College graduate can get a Restricted ATP with 975 hours in a Diamond Katana and 25 hours multi-engine and be the cats-meow for a Regional Airline.

I hope pilots currently assigned UAV can shed some light on their sense of "proficiency" as aviators.

kevbo
12-11-2017, 04:44 PM
Being proficient is more than currency. I've flown with "current" pilots that log over a 1000 hours a year and are brain dead and absolutely suck eggs! I've also flown with 250 hour pilots that would make your eyes water. Most airlines have eliminated the simulator ride as part of the interview process which in my opinion is a big mistake. Pilots are obviously receiving the interview prep that makes them shine for that big day but you can't fundamentally change who they really are.

There are not enough crashes to substantiate the current minimum standards for pilots. Every ATP rated pilot is overqualified for their job. That's why the industry along with a cheaply purchased FAA want to cut it to 500hrs.

Yoda2
12-11-2017, 06:59 PM
There are not enough crashes to substantiate the current minimum standards for pilots. Every ATP rated pilot is overqualified for their job. That's why the industry along with a cheaply purchased FAA want to cut it to 500hrs.

"Every ATP rated pilot is overqualified for their job" That seems a fairly bold and general statement. While a pilot might find themselves underemployed or not presented with requisite personal challenges, Etc. I cannot think of an instance where one would be overqualified.

BeatNavy
12-11-2017, 07:13 PM
"Every ATP rated pilot is overqualified for their job" That seems a fairly bold and general statement. While a pilot might find themselves underemployed or not presented with requisite personal challenges, Etc. I cannot think of an instance where one would be overqualified.

Look at his post history. He is a troll with a huge chip on his shoulder against military pilots, and in some posts all pilots in general. I think be had a traumatic experience from a mil pilot or his own personal deficiencies trying to be one. Purely speculative, but no other explanation for the hate and nonsensical posts he makes.

ellsworb
12-19-2017, 09:01 PM
I VSP'd in 2014 after 4 years in the UAV (and 5 years in the C-17 prior to that). Went to Skywest. Was there a whole 6 months on the line before I had a class date at Delta.

Do not shy away from the regionals. The formula works!

navigatro
12-19-2017, 09:45 PM
Someone who has been out of the cockpit for many years is going to be paddling really hard at any major airline training. UAVs will help just a tiny bit. Pilot skills are very perishable, to say nothing of having to learn all the 121 stuff on top of learning a new jet, while learning how to fly again. I took a year off once, that was eye opening.

Not saying it can't be done, but there's a reason the majors like turbine recency.

totally depends on the person.

I was out of the cockpit for 6 years and had no problems going thru training at a major. For me, the hand-eye stuff came back almost immediately.

The mental part (keeping up with the "jet") took a few sims but came back quickly as well.

rickair7777
12-20-2017, 05:07 AM
totally depends on the person.

I was out of the cockpit for 6 years and had no problems going thru training at a major. For me, the hand-eye stuff came back almost immediately.

The mental part (keeping up with the "jet") took a few sims but came back quickly as well.

Sounds like you're a cut above average. I've seen folks struggle (including me after 18 months, but maybe I just suck). Well in the end I was fine, just didn't feel that way at the time.

navigatro
12-20-2017, 07:25 AM
Sounds like you're a cut above average.

not what my wife says, but thanks for the compliment!

baseball
01-02-2018, 06:50 AM
A few recommendations:

1. Go get a biannual flight review with a local CFI. Get current on the profession. So many changes.
2. Get an instrument proficiency check with a local CFI. Before doing this, do a few instrument refresher.
3. If you don't have an ATP, get one. The BFR and the Instrument work is a good lead in into doing this. Make sure do it a multi engine AC.


After the 3 steps above are done get on with a regional airline. That will get your proficiency up to date and get you squared away with 121 from a knowledge perspective and application perspective. It will check the box for 121 experience for the majors.

Time to majors from doing the above is likely 1 to 1.5 years.

2xAGM114
01-02-2018, 09:45 PM
A few recommendations:


3. If you don't have an ATP, get one. The BFR and the Instrument work is a good lead in into doing this. Make sure do it a multi engine AC.


Many of the regionals will give you the ATP as part of your type rating ride. If you have the mins, apply and ask the question at the interview.

TheRoboFighter
01-03-2018, 04:08 AM
This gentleman flew C-5's not C-150's. I don't think he'll have a problem getting through training, the challenge as for everyone is getting interviews! Apparently, the Regionals are looking more for "qualified" applicants and not necessarily recency of experience. Whereas the majors are looking for the whole package but that will probably change soon as well. I sat as a flight engineer for many years and it all came back quick. It's not rocket science!

AQP training is not designed for rusty/ not current pilots. Attrition rates in training are steadily rising at the majors.

155mm
01-03-2018, 04:45 PM
AQP training is not designed for rusty/ not current pilots. Attrition rates in training are steadily rising at the majors.

Do you have a source for that data? Are the "attrition rates in training" coming from the Majors hiring "rusty/ not current" pilots? What is the background of the folks getting hired in your statement? Former Regional AQP trained pilots? I doubt the Majors have gotten to the bottom of the barrel that they are hiring "rusty/ not current" pilots! Although I'm sure the Regionals are.

In addition, I'm pretty sure Appendix E and H (ass on fire) training programs had higher failure rates compared to this (LOFT type) AQP paradigm. From my experience, AQP is a much easier program not only for initial but re-currency training as well. AQP is certainly more realistic versus a multiple system failures approach to training until you are so overloaded you either swim or drown. So yes, I disagree, I believe a "rusty, non current pilot" can get through an AQP program especially if they have the experience this OP has but I don't believe a Major will hire him or her at this point, only a Regional.

TheRoboFighter
01-03-2018, 04:47 PM
Do you have a source for that data? I'm pretty sure Appendix E and H (ass on fire) training programs had higher failure rates compared to this (LOFT) AQP paradigm.

Not familiar with Appendix E and H?

155mm
01-04-2018, 06:57 AM
Not familiar with Appendix E and H?

https://blog.aopa.org/aopa/2016/07/05/airline-recurrent-training-part-1/

https://www.faa.gov/training_testing/training/aqp/

https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/14/appendix-E_to_part_121

TheRoboFighter
01-04-2018, 04:39 PM
Do you have a source for that data? Are the "attrition rates in training" coming from the Majors hiring "rusty/ not current" pilots? What is the background of the folks getting hired in your statement? Former Regional AQP trained pilots? I doubt the Majors have gotten to the bottom of the barrel that they are hiring "rusty/ not current" pilots! Although I'm sure the Regionals are.

In addition, I'm pretty sure Appendix E and H (ass on fire) training programs had higher failure rates compared to this (LOFT type) AQP paradigm. From my experience, AQP is a much easier program not only for initial but re-currency training as well. AQP is certainly more realistic versus a multiple system failures approach to training until you are so overloaded you either swim or drown. So yes, I disagree, I believe a "rusty, non current pilot" can get through an AQP program especially if they have the experience this OP has but I don't believe a Major will hire him or her at this point, only a Regional.


The data I have (for only one of the majors) is less than 1% attrition in 15 then it jumped to a little over 2% in 16. I don’t have the numbers for 17. However a majority of failed rides and training extensions were to prior military. I don’t have the exact percentage for that. Last discussion I was privileged to was whether there is a correlation between military hires who were turbine current vs. those whos last hours were in SE piston. Just food for thought.

155mm
01-07-2018, 08:42 AM
The data I have (for only one of the majors) is less than 1% attrition in 15 then it jumped to a little over 2% in 16. I don’t have the numbers for 17. However a majority of failed rides and training extensions were to prior military. I don’t have the exact percentage for that. Last discussion I was privileged to was whether there is a correlation between military hires who were turbine current vs. those whos last hours were in SE piston. Just food for thought.

Interesting! AQP training is all about data. it's also a train to proficiency program. From my understanding the data is collected and used to develop future curriculum. If the data shows pilots are having no issues with steep turns, you may not do steep turns on the next cycle and they will focus on trouble areas.

Rumor is, airlines like Delta have been able to shorten the 4 hour sim block to 3:45 for better optimization although that extra 15 minutes could have been used for training to proficiency and re-evaluation for a small minority. They realize not everyone is going to make the mark with the reduced sim time but apparently the bean counters say its cheaper to give a few pilots a repeat of that entire "stage of training" than to require every pilot to have more sim time.

atpcliff
01-07-2018, 10:39 PM
Recently read about a guy out of flying for 20 years. Showed up at the regional cold, and had no problems getting through training...

rickair7777
01-09-2018, 12:04 PM
Recently read about a guy out of flying for 20 years. Showed up at the regional cold, and had no problems getting through training...

Certainly possible, but not necessarily a safe career bet, unless your reason for lack of currency was the space shuttle retired.



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