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View Full Version : Navy Pilot through OCS


yws4234
12-12-2017, 09:38 PM
I am looking for applying for Navy Pilot.
Graduated from University of Michigan with 3.5 gpa in Psychology. 25 years old.
I was a nupoc applicant but did not make it at the final interview because I was not qualified to the nuclear officer.
Through this experience, I have obtained medical examination (which will expire on october) and security clearance. I think I have done everything for navy pilot except taking astb.

My question is how often the navy has the slots for pilot for ocs candidates? I was told that we have to get gurantee for flight school before signing for ocs.

One more question, if I go to flight school after ocs, is it really hard or impossible to be a fighter pilot in navy compared to the academy or nrotc?


rickair7777
12-13-2017, 04:52 AM
I am looking for applying for Navy Pilot.
Graduated from University of Michigan with 3.5 gpa in Psychology. 25 years old.
I was a nupoc applicant but did not make it at the final interview because I was not qualified to the nuclear officer.

Congrats! You saved yourself some misery there. If you can get into aviation, you'll have a much more enjoyable life both during and after the Navy.


My question is how often the navy has the slots for pilot for ocs candidates? I was told that we have to get gurantee for flight school before signing for ocs.

Not sure how many/how often, but yes you want to get a guaranteed flight slot before OCS. Like you said, I think OCS candidates all have designated career tracks before they start.


One more question, if I go to flight school after ocs, is it really hard or impossible to be a fighter pilot in navy compared to the academy or nrotc?

Not at all, it all comes down to flight school performance (and some luck and timing, based on slot availability and needs of the Navy).

Now the ROTC and Academy folks have likely been thinking hard about this for a few years, and they were all on full-ride scholarships so the competition will not be trivial. But it's mostly up to you.

sailingfun
12-13-2017, 05:14 AM
I am looking for applying for Navy Pilot.
Graduated from University of Michigan with 3.5 gpa in Psychology. 25 years old.
I was a nupoc applicant but did not make it at the final interview because I was not qualified to the nuclear officer.
Through this experience, I have obtained medical examination (which will expire on october) and security clearance. I think I have done everything for navy pilot except taking astb.

My question is how often the navy has the slots for pilot for ocs candidates? I was told that we have to get gurantee for flight school before signing for ocs.

One more question, if I go to flight school after ocs, is it really hard or impossible to be a fighter pilot in navy compared to the academy or nrotc?

Referencing your last question once you start flight school assignments within the needs of the Navy are based purely on performance. It does not matter how you got to flight school only how you perform while there. If you are a .001 GPA above a Academy grad you pick before him.


cow0man
12-13-2017, 07:50 AM
Go talk to a officer recruiter. Use whatever study material you can use to prep yourself for the astb. A little naval aviation history and basic parts and function of an airplane, ie. rudder, flaps, airelons, etc.. The astb can be taken only three times in a lifetime, so you want to do your best first time.

The recruiters have slots to fill and can advise you if you need to wait for the next quarter to get a pilot slot.

As far as a guaranteed fighter slot, not going to happen. Do the best you can do and you get to put in a preference. #1 guy will get #1 pick. Needs of the navy, quality spread, and preference will be factored during selection process to determine airframe. Just realize, you are not guranteed a fixed wing airframe.

Before I retired, I was an instructor at a NROTC unit and administered the astb.

Merle Dixon
12-13-2017, 03:27 PM
Save yourself years of pain and misery. Go find an Air National Guard unit. If you get hired, you go to Officer Training School, AF pilot training, follow-on training in your primary aircraft, then back to your guard unit for 2 to 3 years of full-time orders. After that you can live the part-time guard life and find an airline job.

Packrat
12-13-2017, 04:12 PM
Save yourself years of pain and misery. Go find an Air National Guard unit. If you get hired, you go to Officer Training School, AF pilot training, follow-on training in your primary aircraft, then back to your guard unit for 2 to 3 years of full-time orders. After that you can live the part-time guard life and find an airline job.

This is the best advice ever. Navy flying billets are assigned at the end of basic flight training. It has nothing to do with how well or poorly you did through basic but WHAT IS AVAILABLE THE WEEK YOU COMPLETE BASIC.

You may have had the best flight grades in a decade, but if there are nothing but helicopter training billets open, you're going to fly helos. In my case, I wanted to fly multiengine (P-3s or C-130s). The week I graduated there were 5 ME slots and 1 Helo slot. Usually the guy with the highest grades got first pick.

However, everything is driven by the NEEDS OF THE NAVY. Of my classmates, 3 were married and two were ex-P-3 aircrewmen. Additionally, it was the end of the fiscal year and the Navy was out of money for moving. My squadron was in Corpus Christi and helicopter training is in Pensacola.

So, according to the NEEDS OF THE NAVY, it was cheaper to move the only single guy to Pensacola who didn't have P-3 experience.

The other thing you need to watch out for if this story hasn't soured you on Navy flight training is an old recruiter's trick. They'll tell you that if you really want to get in you should apply for BOTH pilot and NFO billets. They lure plenty of guys into the backseater track with that story. If you don't want to be a RIO, TACCO etc. DON'T FALL FOR THEIR TRICK.

The previous poster is correct...Go Guard. Find a unit that flies the jet you want to fly. They'll send you through OTS and the flight program that trains you for THEIR unit. No sweating what billets will be offered the week you complete Basic flight training.

If I had it all to do over again, I'd do that.

Alldaysushi
12-13-2017, 06:01 PM
Have a look at the Marine corp options. Helo, fighter, or transport,
all guaranteed seats, same flight schools as the Navy.

If you're already degreed, OCS, Basic school, and flight school, very straightforward and well respected.

Safe Travels... Sushi

Packrat
12-14-2017, 11:55 AM
If you're already degreed, OCS, Basic school, and flight school, very straightforward and well respected.

Isn't the Basic School a year out of your life learning to be a grunt platoon leader 2nd Lt.? Seems like a diversion from your goal to be an aviator.

Grumble
12-14-2017, 02:19 PM
This is the best advice ever. Navy flying billets are assigned at the end of basic flight training. It has nothing to do with how well or poorly you did through basic but WHAT IS AVAILABLE THE WEEK YOU COMPLETE BASIC.

You may have had the best flight grades in a decade, but if there are nothing but helicopter training billets open, you're going to fly helos. In my case, I wanted to fly multiengine (P-3s or C-130s). The week I graduated there were 5 ME slots and 1 Helo slot. Usually the guy with the highest grades got first pick.

However, everything is driven by the NEEDS OF THE NAVY. Of my classmates, 3 were married and two were ex-P-3 aircrewmen. Additionally, it was the end of the fiscal year and the Navy was out of money for moving. My squadron was in Corpus Christi and helicopter training is in Pensacola.

So, according to the NEEDS OF THE NAVY, it was cheaper to move the only single guy to Pensacola who didn't have P-3 experience.

The other thing you need to watch out for if this story hasn't soured you on Navy flight training is an old recruiter's trick. They'll tell you that if you really want to get in you should apply for BOTH pilot and NFO billets. They lure plenty of guys into the backseater track with that story. If you don't want to be a RIO, TACCO etc. DON'T FALL FOR THEIR TRICK.

The previous poster is correct...Go Guard. Find a unit that flies the jet you want to fly. They'll send you through OTS and the flight program that trains you for THEIR unit. No sweating what billets will be offered the week you complete Basic flight training.

If I had it all to do over again, I'd do that.


This is full of half truths (bitter dude)?

If you are the number one guy, you get first pick of the slots available. They sit you down with the other graduates, they tell you what’s available, then they start with the number one guy.

Yes it’s true that you may graduate the week there are only helo slots available. Personally I’d take that over flying P-3/P-8.

If you want to fly pointy nose jets, there is no better place than the deck of an aircraft carrier to do it. Yes it’s hard to get there, yes there will be pain involved, yes the days are long and the weeks are longer.

However the years fly by, and when it’s all over, you’ll be sad to leave. Your first sea tour will be a brotherhood of friends you’ll keep for life. Every time you take that cat shot, and hit the end of the cat stroke, throw the gear up and accelerate to 7 miles at 500 knots/500 feet and park the nose bullseye nose high.... none of any of that pain will be at the forefront of your mind. Ever. You’ll see and do things you’ll only ever talk about with those that have been there, because you just can’t explain it to those that haven’t.

There is truth to the recruiters tricks. Do NOT apply for any job you don’t absolutely want. If you only want to be a pilot, leave the rest of the lines blank (or put pilot in all of them). All that said, Naval Aviation is a special club and it’s not looking for guys that need to be convinced to sign up. Good luck with whatever you decide to do.

Packrat
12-14-2017, 02:43 PM
Sorry Grumble, but its 100% true. Back in 1980 at least. Last week of the fiscal year so moving funds were tight. In addition, they had been getting too many low rollers in the helicopter world so the Navy ordered that for a period of time every other pilot would be "awarded" helo orders regardless of their desires.

That was also the time when the CNO ordered the FRS units to attrite a minimum of 10% of the pilots ordered into them. That was after a number of marginal grade A-7 pilots were involved in accidents.

Granted, things are probably different today, but I'm sure the old detailer's mantra, "Its the Needs of the Navy," is still in full force.

P.S. I actually enjoyed my helicopter tour although it did cost me 5 years seniority at my airline career. One of my contemporaries actually turned down an offer to transition to A-6s because his lifelong goal was to fly Navy helicopters.

That's why there's different flavors of ice cream.

USMCFLYR
12-14-2017, 03:16 PM
Isn't the Basic School a year out of your life learning to be a grunt platoon leader 2nd Lt.? Seems like a diversion from your goal to be an aviator.

It's about being a Marine.
I achieved my goal just fine.

rickair7777
12-14-2017, 03:17 PM
Sorry Grumble, but its 100% true. Back in 1980 at least. Last week of the fiscal year so moving funds were tight. In addition, they had been getting too many low rollers in the helicopter world so the Navy ordered that for a period of time every other pilot would be "awarded" helo orders regardless of their desires.


I have seen on numerous occasions Navy-wide where PCS costs drove detailing and even career-track decisions. Not just aviation. It happens. From the tax-paer perspective it makes sense. From the service-member perspective it blows.

But Navy helo guys who get FW time as an IP or at a regional are a shoe-in for the bigs.

B2G2
12-15-2017, 12:24 AM
yws4234,

Your situation is very similar to mine from 10 years ago. The advice you're getting here is golden.

PM sent with some more details.

B2G2

Grumble
12-15-2017, 09:19 AM
Sorry Grumble, but its 100% true. Back in 1980 at least. Last week of the fiscal year so moving funds were tight. In addition, they had been getting too many low rollers in the helicopter world so the Navy ordered that for a period of time every other pilot would be "awarded" helo orders regardless of their desires.

That was also the time when the CNO ordered the FRS units to attrite a minimum of 10% of the pilots ordered into them. That was after a number of marginal grade A-7 pilots were involved in accidents.

Granted, things are probably different today, but I'm sure the old detailer's mantra, "Its the Needs of the Navy," is still in full force.

P.S. I actually enjoyed my helicopter tour although it did cost me 5 years seniority at my airline career. One of my contemporaries actually turned down an offer to transition to A-6s because his lifelong goal was to fly Navy helicopters.

That's why there's different flavors of ice cream.

They did the “quality spread” thing when I went through too. Didn’t work out as it was a shot to the head of everyone’s motivation. They killed it pretty fast.

Sorry you got screwed the week you selected 40 years ago, but telling this kid that’s how it always is, is BS.

rickair7777
12-15-2017, 11:30 AM
No more quality spread? I recall folks would Adjust their performance to jockey for a position tion in the pack that might give them a crack at what they wanted.

Packrat
12-15-2017, 11:52 AM
It's about being a Marine.
I achieved my goal just fine.

Of course it is. But you have to want to be a Marine first and foremost. That's what makes the Marines different from all the other services.

Its what makes the Corps the Corps.

Packrat
12-15-2017, 11:56 AM
I have seen on numerous occasions Navy-wide where PCS costs drove detailing and even career-track decisions. Not just aviation. It happens. From the tax-paer perspective it makes sense. From the service-member perspective it blows.

Tell it to Grumble. He thinks its B.S.

But Navy helo guys who get FW time as an IP or at a regional are a shoe-in for the bigs.

That's how it worked out for me. 2nd duty station got me both H-46 and C-12 time. That lead to VR squadrons as a TAR flying VC-131H and C-9B. It just took 5 extra years of active duty to get the quals I needed to get my Major airline job.

USMCFLYR
12-15-2017, 01:00 PM
Of course it is. But you have to want to be a Marine first and foremost. That's what makes the Marines different from all the other services.

Its what makes the Corps the Corps.
Correct.

So if you want to be a Marine and fly - 7 months at TBS (not including waiting for TBS and then waiting for your spot at flight school) is part of the price you pay.

So in reference to the post that you responded too:
Originally Posted by Alldaysushi https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/109852-navy-pilot-through-ocs-post2483009.html#post2483009)
If you're already degreed, OCS, Basic school, and flight school, very straightforward and well respected.
Isn't the Basic School a year out of your life learning to be a grunt platoon leader 2nd Lt.? Seems like a diversion from your goal to be an aviator.
In that case it isn't a diversion from the path - it is the path.

I tell people - you had better want to be a Marine first, because it is a longer, more difficult path to get into the cockpit than any other service.

Rickair7777 - as far as someone trying to play the game of figuring out when they are going to graduate and what the week's selection tree is going to shake out - it is all guess work. Unless you are sitting in the seats actually deciding what slots are available each week, you are just trying to make some educated guess using hearsay and gouge. There will be successes, there will be failures. Thinking you actually played the cards right I'll bet has a small, if any at all, percentage in the outcome.

Also - if you are found to be trying to play that game - both your fellow students and the IPs will be spreading that word which will follow you for quite some time to come - and Naval Aviation is a small group that just keeps getting closer and closer the further you go along your training, community, fleet, coast, Wing/Group/CAG/squadron/Etc......

Quality spread? The USMC is famous for the HELO drafts. Of course that is the chance you take to be in a service who's aviation arm is probably well north of 70% helos (no - I don't know the exact numbers). But within the T-34C selection process I didn't see too much quality spread in my short time there with my peers going through the selection process. I saw quality spread within the Strike/Fighter pipeline. There was a Harrier cut-off for the NSS and you had to be ABOVE that NSS in order to be selected for Harriers (flawed logic in my opinion, but who is asking the 1st Lt at the time right?!) I have no idea if they are still doing that.

BoxFlyer
12-17-2017, 07:50 AM
I was in your boat back in 87. Graduated from college and then went into the USMC with an air contract. Off to Quantico, Va for OCS (10 weeks), 2 days off before going to TBS (6 months). Every Marine officer does TBS before heading out to their specialty school.

Marine, Navy and Coast Guard (a few) all do basic indoc and primary flight school together before “pipeline” selection. Do your best and let the chips fall where they do. A lot is luck and timing, the needs of the Navy and USMC can change week to week.

Good luck

sourdough44
12-17-2017, 02:40 PM
I would get in and talk to an ‘Officer’ recruiter about options. I would also look into every other service with potential flight positions, Coast Guard, Guard units, Air Force, everything. You need current information to make decisions.

Cast a wide net. If finances allow, look into some flight instruction now.

Grumble
12-17-2017, 07:10 PM
I would get in and talk to an ‘Officer’ recruiter about options. I would also look into every other service with potential flight positions, Coast Guard, Guard units, Air Force, everything. You need current information to make decisions.

Cast a wide net. If finances allow, look into some flight instruction now.

Good points.

If I were going in today, you’d have a hard time convincing me the USCG isn’t the best place to be flying anything.

Packrat
12-18-2017, 03:54 AM
Cast a wide net. If finances allow, look into some flight instruction now.

Good advice with a caveat...All of the guys/gals with previous flight experience did well in Primary. The exception was one with a lot of flight time who just couldn't stop doing squared turn approaches and ended up washing out.

Prior flight time helps, but be ready to adjust your thinking to the "Navy way" from civilian procedures.

Packrat
12-18-2017, 03:57 AM
If I were going in today, you’d have a hard time convincing me the USCG isn’t the best place to be flying anything.

I'd have to agree. Naval aviation training and performing the real mission every day. Once upon a time I looked into transferring but it would have cost me a rank and the Coast Guard wasn't flying much due to budget restraints. So I went TAR instead.

SaltyDog
12-18-2017, 07:54 PM
yws4234
World is full of people that will sour our dreams. They generally mean well and you can divine some lessons in it all.
Life is full of challenges.
Go out and become a Naval Aviator, hopefully you will become a fighter pilot. You can go in the Guard or Coast Guard afterwards.
DOD in general is a roulette wheel, only thing common, all services serve the organization first. No surprise.
If you want it, be to stupid to quit. Worked for most of us on this forum with an aviation disease. Alternate planning a must.
Certainly don't base a final decision on the possibilities of what may not go your way, but on the opportunities and dreams if they do come true.
Worked for me. Worked for many.
Best of fortune to you

Packrat
12-19-2017, 08:32 AM
yws4234
World is full of people that will sour our dreams. They generally mean well and you can divine some lessons in it all.
Life is full of challenges.
Go out and become a Naval Aviator, hopefully you will become a fighter pilot. You can go in the Guard or Coast Guard afterwards.
DOD in general is a roulette wheel, only thing common, all services serve the organization first. No surprise.
If you want it, be to stupid to quit. Worked for most of us on this forum with an aviation disease. Alternate planning a must.
Certainly don't base a final decision on the possibilities of what may not go your way, but on the opportunities and dreams if they do come true.
Worked for me. Worked for many.
Best of fortune to you

Salty's right. If you don't try you'll never know.



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