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View Full Version : 0 time to FO?


fatman1683
01-12-2018, 06:13 PM
I've been doing a lot of research lately, and it seems like the legacy carriers all have a pretty well-described path from nothing to a right seat: affiliated flight school or university, CFI timebuilding, WO or affiliated regional, then flow to the big leagues.

SWA doesn't have RJ partners or affiliated schools, and it leaves me curious as to the different paths people take to get from 0 time to FO.

I'd love to hear stories or advice anyone can offer on their own experiences or what might be the most efficient approach these days. Time is a factor, as I'm already in my 30s and flying will be my second career.

Thanks in advance.


at6d
01-13-2018, 09:54 PM
Like you said, time is a factor. In fact, timing is more likely the factor in question nowadays.

Step one is be able to get a medical. Once that's out of the way, you have several ways to do it between civilian and military routes.

I don't have the military background, so I'm out on that...but it's worthwhile looking into the options available there, including Guard, Reserve, Coast Guard, etc.

As for the civilian route, it's pretty cut and dry. You have to jump through all the hoops like the rest of us; the regionals are not an option until you have achieved the minimum hiring requirements along with your private through commercial ratings.

I'm pre-9/11 and a lost decade member, and the rules have changed since then, but the idea is to land a job where you can build time quickly--with the intent on building multi-engine turbine PIC time when able.

The regional industry is a good way to do it, and has recently become shorthanded and better paid. There is a joke in there somewhere, but the regionals beat the humor out of me.

Good luck.

fatman1683
01-14-2018, 05:57 PM
...but the idea is to land a job where you can build time quickly--with the intent on building multi-engine turbine PIC time when able.

The regional industry is a good way to do it, and has recently become shorthanded and better paid...

Are there any regionals that SWA has a particular preference for, or that would best prepare a pilot for flying at a major? From reading the forums here it seems like they range from bad to godawful, and while I accept that I'll have to grind it out, I'd like to make sure I'm on the best path.

That also raises the question of getting into the regionals in the first place. The CFI vs 135 question gets asked a lot, I'd be interested in the opinions of SWA pilots specifically on that issue.


at6d
01-14-2018, 06:15 PM
We seem to get a lot of Skywest guys. Envoy is ok and has a flow to AA, but that place may be drastically different from my Eagle days.

happygilmore
01-15-2018, 03:59 AM
and while I accept that I'll have to grind it out, I'd like to make sure I'm on the best path.

Also consider the corporate world path. There are a lot of vacancies with corporate pilots getting hired directly to majors and legacy airlines. Pay is going up significantly. I spent 20 years corporate didn't have to grind a single day of regional airline life. Just do your homework and make sure you choose the right flight department. If they're always hiring you don't want to be there. I start with SWA in February.

Proximity
01-15-2018, 05:37 AM
Also consider the corporate world path.

Thing about corporate is that you build time so much slower. Even if someone today wants to go corporate, I'd still recommend to them to fly for a regional until they get a good base of experience, and some turbine PIC if possbile. It's also much harder to make the crossover to a major from corporate. SWA (and Fedex) seem to like corporate pilots, but at the other majors it's much more difficult to make the crossover from what I've seen.

Salukidawg
01-16-2018, 08:47 AM
The other problem with Corporate is that they pretty much want you to come out of the womb wanting to be a Corporate Pilot and ONLY a Corporate Pilot. You donít want them to find out that youíre using them to build experience to eventually move on to the Airlines. They generally despise that and wonít want to hire you. I agree with others on this thread that if your goal is WN or any other Airline for that matter, youíre much better off going to the Regionals. As others have said ExpressJet, Envoy (AA flow through), Skywest, Republic all are pretty decent Airlines and offer fairly quick upgrades. The good news is that there has pretty much never been a better time than right now to get into flying. Your chances of getting a decent Regional job with very low Flight time is very good and your career progression to the Majors will be a fraction of the time it took most of us on this website to get to our respective Airlines.

Laramie
01-16-2018, 09:15 AM
The regional industry is a good way to do it, and has recently become shorthanded and better paid. There is a joke in there somewhere, but the regionals beat the humor out of me.

Good luck.

This. ^^^^^^^^^^

barabek
01-16-2018, 09:36 AM
The other problem with Corporate is that they pretty much want you to come out of the womb wanting to be a Corporate Pilot and ONLY a Corporate Pilot. You donít want them to find out that youíre using them to build experience to eventually move on to the Airlines. They generally despise that and wonít want to hire you. I agree with others on this thread that if your goal is WN or any other Airline for that matter, youíre much better off going to the Regionals. As others have said ExpressJet, Envoy (AA flow through), Skywest, Republic all are pretty decent Airlines and offer fairly quick upgrades. The good news is that there has pretty much never been a better time than right now to get into flying. Your chances of getting a decent Regional job with very low Flight time is very good and your career progression to the Majors will be a fraction of the time it took most of us on this website to get to our respective Airlines.

I'd recommend checking the info on Expressjet and a quick upgrade before deciding to join the "sinking ship". There are plenty of better choices nowadays.

Salukidawg
01-16-2018, 09:54 AM
I'd recommend checking the info on Expressjet and a quick upgrade before deciding to join the "sinking ship". There are plenty of better choices nowadays.

Absolutely. As a former COEX/XJTíer I agree. I only mentioned ExpressJet because WN hires a lot from ExpressJet and the OP asked which Regionals WN likes to hire from. I agree that the upgrade is probably a lot longer than some of the other options out there though. Thanks for clarifying that.

barabek
01-16-2018, 11:00 AM
Absolutely. As a former COEX/XJTíer I agree. I only mentioned ExpressJet because WN hires a lot from ExpressJet and the OP asked which Regionals WN likes to hire from. I agree that the upgrade is probably a lot longer than some of the other options out there though. Thanks for clarifying that.

I agree, and I am myself an ex-XJT guy at SWA. There are a lot of us here. The question is how many FOs with no TPIC from XJT got hired here. I don't have the statistics, but I'm ready to guess: probably 0. If you go to XJT today, you're gonna sit reserve as an FO for years, and you'll probably never see the left seat before the airline is shut down. Also, the reason why there are so many XJT guys hired is mostly based on numbers. It's a big pilot group hence the high numbers. The same can be told about Skywest and Republic. On top of that, XJT pilots are fully aware of the future of their airline, what makes them extra motivated to seek other employment. Also, there are pilots from all regionals hired here and I don't think Southwest prefers any specific regional. I wouldn't be surprised if the numbers were equal considering the size of each pilot group. As I said, I have no data to prove it, just my opinion. I'd be interested myself. Maybe there's someone with the numbers to share...

PowerShift
01-16-2018, 11:22 AM
At your age the military is not an option. If this is a serious enterprise that you are considering this is my recomendations.

Quit your job and find a local flight school you can work with full time and acquire all the ratings. Private, Instrument, Commercial, Multi-Engine and Instructor ratings. This is 12-18 months. Consider buying an airplane.

Then instruct full time for 6 months.

You need 1200 hrs to fly part 135 PIC. Try and find a Part 135 SIC gig until you have 1200 hrs. Fly cargo, pax, etc and try and get as much PIC time as you can.

When I had 2500 TT and 1000 PIC multi/Turbine I would go to Skywest. Now you have the mins to start applying to the majors and at the same time your working for a regional.

This is a 5 year track to a major airline job. Most here did just as I described and where on that track prior to 9/11, economy downturn, age 65, bankruptcyís, etc etc.

Itís a full time commitment, low or no pay, and bad hours. Think of it as 4 years of college all over again.

Regards.

fatman1683
01-16-2018, 07:07 PM
At your age the military is not an option. If this is a serious enterprise that you are considering this is my recomendations.

Quit your job and find a local flight school you can work with full time and acquire all the ratings. Private, Instrument, Commercial, Multi-Engine and Instructor ratings. This is 12-18 months. Consider buying an airplane.

Then instruct full time for 6 months.

You need 1200 hrs to fly part 135 PIC. Try and find a Part 135 SIC gig until you have 1200 hrs. Fly cargo, pax, etc and try and get as much PIC time as you can.

When I had 2500 TT and 1000 PIC multi/Turbine I would go to Skywest. Now you have the mins to start applying to the majors and at the same time your working for a regional.

This is a 5 year track to a major airline job. Most here did just as I described and where on that track prior to 9/11, economy downturn, age 65, bankruptcyís, etc etc.

Itís a full time commitment, low or no pay, and bad hours. Think of it as 4 years of college all over again.

Regards.

This is pretty much the path I'm considering, full-time training and a combination of CFI and 135 until regional mins. Doing this in a reasonable amount of time depends on finding an active school to instruct at and a 135 carrier that will put me in the air as often as possible, and that's really my biggest worry.

at6d
01-17-2018, 09:03 AM
Have you done any flight training/experience whatsoever yet?

Before you put all your eggs in one basket, make sure itís something you actually enjoy. Take a few lessons first.

Jeff Lebowski
01-17-2018, 09:34 AM
This is pretty much the path I'm considering, full-time training and a combination of CFI and 135 until regional mins. Doing this in a reasonable amount of time depends on finding an active school to instruct at and a 135 carrier that will put me in the air as often as possible, and that's really my biggest worry.

A word of caution:

I, like you, started flying a few years later than was probably optimal (28, in my case). I walked away from something that made me miserable to pursue something I'd always dreamed of. I was single and I figured you only get one shot at life, so might as well go for it.

Got my ratings in thirteen months--CFI through multi and multi instructor. Hit the instructing gig as hard as I could--I lived at the FBO, looking to pick up scraps. I also flew traffic watch and did aircraft deliveries for a shyster broker near Phoenix. Anything I could do to build time, I did.

After about a year-and-a-half of instructing, I got a job at Ameriflight. Did that for seven months and took a job as an air ambulance captain. I had my first regional interview scheduled for October 2001 but the events of the preceding month (9/11) put the kibosh on that.

By the time the regionals were hiring again I was married with a baby on the way and I was the main earner (hell, the only earner at that time) for my household. No matter how I tried to pencil it out, I could not afford to be a regional FO. Between the commute and the starvation wages, it would have plunged my family into turmoil, and I just didn't see the upside.

I wound up getting drawn into the fractional/private jet world for the next thirteen years. Five months ago, I got hired on at Southwest and I was the third-oldest guy in my class. I've got a seventeen-year bite at the apple here. Seventeen years. Barring any unforeseen hiccups, that'll be plenty for me to put the kids through school and retire with the wife (whom I never would have met were it not for flying, or the shakeups caused by 9/11, for that matter) to a life of unambitious luxury.

So I guess my point, if there is one, is this: don't be surprised if your five-year plan becomes a ten-, or even a fifteen-year plan. This industry is notoriously volatile, and the best laid plans have a way of falling by the wayside. Do this because you think you'll love it, and try to see every job as an opportunity to learn more, challenge yourself more, take on more responsibility and maybe even have a little fun. There's a lot of flying to be done out there, a lot of adventure to be had, and if you go about it thinking you have got to check off this box and this box by such and such a time, you might just miss the whole point.

And with that, I will cede my soapbox to the floor ...

RadarColor
01-17-2018, 10:58 AM
A word of caution:

I, like you, started flying a few years later than was probably optimal (28, in my case). I walked away from something that made me miserable to pursue something I'd always dreamed of. I was single and I figured you only get one shot at life, so might as well go for it.

Got my ratings in thirteen months--CFI through multi and multi instructor. Hit the instructing gig as hard as I could--I lived at the FBO, looking to pick up scraps. I also flew traffic watch and did aircraft deliveries for a shyster broker near Phoenix. Anything I could do to build time, I did.

After about a year-and-a-half of instructing, I got a job at Ameriflight. Did that for seven months and took a job as an air ambulance captain. I had my first regional interview scheduled for October 2001 but the events of the preceding month (9/11) put the kibosh on that.

By the time the regionals were hiring again I was married with a baby on the way and I was the main earner (hell, the only earner at that time) for my household. No matter how I tried to pencil it out, I could not afford to be a regional FO. Between the commute and the starvation wages, it would have plunged my family into turmoil, and I just didn't see the upside.

I wound up getting drawn into the fractional/private jet world for the next thirteen years. Five months ago, I got hired on at Southwest and I was the third-oldest guy in my class. I've got a seventeen-year bite at the apple here. Seventeen years. Barring any unforeseen hiccups, that'll be plenty for me to put the kids through school and retire with the wife (whom I never would have met were it not for flying, or the shakeups caused by 9/11, for that matter) to a life of unambitious luxury.

So I guess my point, if there is one, is this: don't be surprised if your five-year plan becomes a ten-, or even a fifteen-year plan. This industry is notoriously volatile, and the best laid plans have a way of falling by the wayside. Do this because you think you'll love it, and try to see every job as an opportunity to learn more, challenge yourself more, take on more responsibility and maybe even have a little fun. There's a lot of flying to be done out there, a lot of adventure to be had, and if you go about it thinking you have got to check off this box and this box by such and such a time, you might just miss the whole point.

And with that, I will cede my soapbox to the floor ...

Great Post....

ZapBrannigan
01-17-2018, 01:26 PM
A word of caution:

I, like you, started flying a few years later than was probably optimal (28, in my case). I walked away from something that made me miserable to pursue something I'd always dreamed of. I was single and I figured you only get one shot at life, so might as well go for it.

Got my ratings in thirteen months--CFI through multi and multi instructor. Hit the instructing gig as hard as I could--I lived at the FBO, looking to pick up scraps. I also flew traffic watch and did aircraft deliveries for a shyster broker near Phoenix. Anything I could do to build time, I did.

After about a year-and-a-half of instructing, I got a job at Ameriflight. Did that for seven months and took a job as an air ambulance captain. I had my first regional interview scheduled for October 2001 but the events of the preceding month (9/11) put the kibosh on that.

By the time the regionals were hiring again I was married with a baby on the way and I was the main earner (hell, the only earner at that time) for my household. No matter how I tried to pencil it out, I could not afford to be a regional FO. Between the commute and the starvation wages, it would have plunged my family into turmoil, and I just didn't see the upside.

I wound up getting drawn into the fractional/private jet world for the next thirteen years. Five months ago, I got hired on at Southwest and I was the third-oldest guy in my class. I've got a seventeen-year bite at the apple here. Seventeen years. Barring any unforeseen hiccups, that'll be plenty for me to put the kids through school and retire with the wife (whom I never would have met were it not for flying, or the shakeups caused by 9/11, for that matter) to a life of unambitious luxury.

So I guess my point, if there is one, is this: don't be surprised if your five-year plan becomes a ten-, or even a fifteen-year plan. This industry is notoriously volatile, and the best laid plans have a way of falling by the wayside. Do this because you think you'll love it, and try to see every job as an opportunity to learn more, challenge yourself more, take on more responsibility and maybe even have a little fun. There's a lot of flying to be done out there, a lot of adventure to be had, and if you go about it thinking you have got to check off this box and this box by such and such a time, you might just miss the whole point.

And with that, I will cede my soapbox to the floor ...



Excellent post.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

fatman1683
01-17-2018, 01:34 PM
Have you done any flight training/experience whatsoever yet?

Before you put all your eggs in one basket, make sure itís something you actually enjoy. Take a few lessons first.

I have about 8 hours in a 172 from a lifetime ago. Aviation has been a lifelong passion, I could just never manage to turn it into a career. 9/11 happened when I was a senior in high school and flying didn't exactly seem like the smartest career move at the time, so I took another direction. I'll also be finishing up my PPL before I commit to any sort of serious training program.

...Good Advice...

I've definitely considered this, and it's one reason I'm not quitting my day job anytime soon. My current employer is 100% remote, which means I can work from anywhere, and my hours are pretty flexible, so should be able to fly for 15-20 hours a week while still working which should let me get my training done in less than nine months, accounting for weather. If I can get a solid CFI job and keep up the same pace, I can hit 500TT and qualify for a 135 right seat within 3-4 months after that.

At that point I look at the math and try to determine whether it makes sense to quit my job and fly full time, either as an instructor, 135 FO, or a combination of the two, the goal being to hit ATP minimums within 18 months of starting my training and start applying to the regionals.

After that the plan gets fuzzy, because it's impossible to predict upgrades/major hiring cycles that far out, but RJ wages aren't quite starvation level anymore, so I should be able to make it work.

I'm expecting a grind, and I know none of it is going to come easy and I'm probably not going to make my 18 month goal, but I really appreciate all the advice everyone has given. It makes the whole thing a little less daunting to know that plenty of guys make it to the top.

flaps 9
01-19-2018, 12:39 PM
A word of caution:

I, like you, started flying a few years later than was probably optimal (28, in my case). I walked away from something that made me miserable to pursue something I'd always dreamed of. I was single and I figured you only get one shot at life, so might as well go for it.

Got my ratings in thirteen months--CFI through multi and multi instructor. Hit the instructing gig as hard as I could--I lived at the FBO, looking to pick up scraps. I also flew traffic watch and did aircraft deliveries for a shyster broker near Phoenix. Anything I could do to build time, I did.

After about a year-and-a-half of instructing, I got a job at Ameriflight. Did that for seven months and took a job as an air ambulance captain. I had my first regional interview scheduled for October 2001 but the events of the preceding month (9/11) put the kibosh on that.

By the time the regionals were hiring again I was married with a baby on the way and I was the main earner (hell, the only earner at that time) for my household. No matter how I tried to pencil it out, I could not afford to be a regional FO. Between the commute and the starvation wages, it would have plunged my family into turmoil, and I just didn't see the upside.

I wound up getting drawn into the fractional/private jet world for the next thirteen years. Five months ago, I got hired on at Southwest and I was the third-oldest guy in my class. I've got a seventeen-year bite at the apple here. Seventeen years. Barring any unforeseen hiccups, that'll be plenty for me to put the kids through school and retire with the wife (whom I never would have met were it not for flying, or the shakeups caused by 9/11, for that matter) to a life of unambitious luxury.

So I guess my point, if there is one, is this: don't be surprised if your five-year plan becomes a ten-, or even a fifteen-year plan. This industry is notoriously volatile, and the best laid plans have a way of falling by the wayside. Do this because you think you'll love it, and try to see every job as an opportunity to learn more, challenge yourself more, take on more responsibility and maybe even have a little fun. There's a lot of flying to be done out there, a lot of adventure to be had, and if you go about it thinking you have got to check off this box and this box by such and such a time, you might just miss the whole point.

And with that, I will cede my soapbox to the floor ...


Did I just fly with you? :cool:

Laramie
01-19-2018, 01:16 PM
I have about 8 hours in a 172 from a lifetime ago. Aviation has been a lifelong passion, I could just never manage to turn it into a career. 9/11 happened when I was a senior in high school and flying didn't exactly seem like the smartest career move at the time, so I took another direction. I'll also be finishing up my PPL before I commit to any sort of serious training program.



I've definitely considered this, and it's one reason I'm not quitting my day job anytime soon. My current employer is 100% remote, which means I can work from anywhere, and my hours are pretty flexible, so should be able to fly for 15-20 hours a week while still working which should let me get my training done in less than nine months, accounting for weather. If I can get a solid CFI job and keep up the same pace, I can hit 500TT and qualify for a 135 right seat within 3-4 months after that.

At that point I look at the math and try to determine whether it makes sense to quit my job and fly full time, either as an instructor, 135 FO, or a combination of the two, the goal being to hit ATP minimums within 18 months of starting my training and start applying to the regionals.

After that the plan gets fuzzy, because it's impossible to predict upgrades/major hiring cycles that far out, but RJ wages aren't quite starvation level anymore, so I should be able to make it work.

I'm expecting a grind, and I know none of it is going to come easy and I'm probably not going to make my 18 month goal, but I really appreciate all the advice everyone has given. It makes the whole thing a little less daunting to know that plenty of guys make it to the top.


One suggestion. Get comfortable with the idea of either 91/135 jet flying or flying for a commuter airline.

If you make it to a major, let that be a bonus. We're really only here for the money anyway.

And if you're not willing to move to base........

I've walked your road. It can be done. Worth it? In my case yes.

texaspropguy
01-19-2018, 02:48 PM
XJT... Hands down. So far down, we have nowhere to go but up!

VitaliyG
01-19-2018, 03:38 PM
If you want to end up at SWA or any other major, try to stay away from 91/135 flying. Like you I want to get a job with a good major airline.
In 2008, I was FO at RAH and after furlough chose not to take recall, instead I was already in left seat flying a Jetstream 32 for a 135 company. At that time 1000TPIC was important, so I thought I was chasing the right carrot. Fast forward a decade and in a job fair I heard from swa recruiter that regional FO is more attractive to them then turboprop guy with several thousand of TPIC 135. I chose wrong. They can choose whichever way they see fit - you can't, so regionals are safer bet. Also, think of it this way, in 121 you will build a network of connections that potentially will help you with your dream job. 91/135 you will also be building connections but they rarely lead to 121 majors. Just my humble .02. Good luck with your ratings and future employment.

fatman1683
01-21-2018, 05:45 AM
Yeah, any 91/135 flying I do would be purely in aid of getting to a regional. I figure having some turbine time mixed in with my CFI hours might help me land that first 121 job, but if it adds six months to the process because I'm not flying as much, it won't be worth it.

Still a lot of open questions that won't really be answered until I get there, but I feel like the industry is flexible enough right now that I don't necessarily have to commit to a specific path yet.

flysocal77
01-21-2018, 09:45 AM
Gotta disagree with 121>135. PIC is PIC. 121 guys in my class had more total time than the 3 corporate guys so I would say 135>121 but letís just say itís equal. I believe being all 91/135 helped me stand out at the interview since they seemed interested in my unique experiences. There is no doubt the 121 guys have the easiest transition but after a year on the line itís all the same. This belief is pretty popular even a SWA recruiter told me to apply at Sky West to be competitive. That was the worst advise Iíve been given in my professional career. Quit my 150k job for an FO position at a regional. A year later I was hired. The gravy 91 job may not be the best route since some guys fly <200hrs year and get lazy sitting around. Many of my friends have this problem.

Sqwk7700
01-21-2018, 12:04 PM
If you want to end up at SWA or any other major, try to stay away from 91/135 flying. Like you I want to get a job with a good major airline.


Not sure I agree. I know many pilots flying for swa/majors without any 121 experience, myself included.

ZapBrannigan
01-27-2018, 03:54 AM
I had flown 121 pre 9/11. For most of the decade prior to getting hired at SW though, it was all part 91 in a light jet. Although the flight time totals were relatively low, the recruiters loved the stories of unique challenges and customer service ďsavesĒ that are the corporate pilotís bread and butter.

I think that in the sea of blue suits and red ties all with identical RJ pilot background, a corporate pilot can stand out from the crowd - especially at an airline like SWA that puts such a heavy emphasis on customer service.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

capt707
01-27-2018, 08:08 AM
Fast forward a decade and in a job fair I heard from swa recruiter that regional FO is more attractive to them then turboprop guy with several thousand of TPIC 135.

Has SWA actually hired anyone (yet) with 0 TPIC time?

flythemuppets
01-27-2018, 09:19 AM
Yes. I was the only one in my class without but I know several here without pic time.

capt707
01-27-2018, 09:49 AM
Yes. I was the only one in my class without but I know several here without pic time.

That's great! Congrats! How were you able to get in? Internal recs? Job fair?

flythemuppets
01-27-2018, 10:18 AM
I was flying a 737 with my previous airline and attended OBAP last August. I think the previous experience helped tip the scale but from my understanding face time is key.

Jeff Lebowski
01-27-2018, 02:29 PM
I had flown 121 pre 9/11. For most of the decade prior to getting hired at SW though, it was all part 91 in a light jet. Although the flight time totals were relatively low, the recruiters loved the stories of unique challenges and customer service ďsavesĒ that are the corporate pilotís bread and butter.

I think that in the sea of blue suits and red ties all with identical RJ pilot background, a corporate pilot can stand out from the crowd - especially at an airline like SWA that puts such a heavy emphasis on customer service.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


^^^^^^
This!

Varsity
02-07-2018, 03:55 PM
the recruiters loved the stories of unique challenges and customer service ďsavesĒ that are the corporate pilotís bread and butter.

I think that in the sea of blue suits and red ties all with identical RJ pilot background, a corporate pilot can stand out from the crowd - especially at an airline like SWA that puts such a heavy emphasis on customer service.

This.

Walking up to a recruiter and telling them you fly an RJ is 90% of what they hear all day. Stand out from the crowd positively.

I hope to have turbojet 91, 135 and 121 experience before I talk to a recruiter at a major.

PowerShift
02-07-2018, 04:26 PM
Has SWA actually hired anyone (yet) with 0 TPIC time?

Me, 0 jet time. Thousands of hrs turbo prop.

at6d
02-08-2018, 10:36 AM
But thatís still Turbine time.

I donít know of anyone without the PIC time.

KC135
02-08-2018, 10:54 AM
I've been doing a lot of research lately, and it seems like the legacy carriers all have a pretty well-described path from nothing to a right seat: affiliated flight school or university, CFI timebuilding, WO or affiliated regional, then flow to the big leagues.

SWA doesn't have RJ partners or affiliated schools, and it leaves me curious as to the different paths people take to get from 0 time to FO.

I'd love to hear stories or advice anyone can offer on their own experiences or what might be the most efficient approach these days. Time is a factor, as I'm already in my 30s and flying will be my second career.

Thanks in advance.

If youíre looking for the fastest path to a major. UAL has now hired its first group of flight instructors directly from the ATCA flight school. Straight from beechcraft to boeing. No TPIC or even TSIC required.

Milksheikh
02-08-2018, 02:31 PM
If youíre looking for the fastest path to a major. UAL has now hired its first group of flight instructors directly from the ATCA flight school. Straight from beechcraft to boeing. No TPIC or even TSIC required.

Wow good for those guys picked up at ual with under 2k total time and no turbine at all. xjt cpp pilots get 25% of all new hire slots.. any idea on the flight instructors from atca? 10%?

aiir
02-08-2018, 08:36 PM
If youíre looking for the fastest path to a major. UAL has now hired its first group of flight instructors directly from the ATCA flight school. Straight from beechcraft to boeing. No TPIC or even TSIC required.

Iím about to start my training and Iím really interested in being a part of this program at ATCA, besides the information posted on their website (ATCA), do you have any other insider information such a success rate, both in the program and with regards to Unitedís training department?

KC135
02-10-2018, 01:07 PM
The total percent of UAL new hires being ATCA flight instructors should be around 3 percent since the total CPP is 35% this year. I'm not sure about the success rate since the first batch of flight instructors haven't completing training yet. I don't have much info on it, I've just been researching it for my nephew.



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