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View Full Version : Retirement Advisors


tarpon56
01-16-2018, 04:25 PM
Guys-

Can anyone recommend an Retirement advisor they are currently using or have a recommendation. I'm about 4 years away with a substantial 401k managed by myself.

I seek a fee based advisor only someone to oversee my portfolio and retirement planning a few times a year.

Chicago north suburbs and S. wisconsin location.

Thanks


Fourpaw
02-01-2018, 03:47 PM
Guys-

Can anyone recommend an Retirement advisor they are currently using or have a recommendation. I'm about 4 years away with a substantial 401k managed by myself.

I seek a fee based advisor only someone to oversee my portfolio and retirement planning a few times a year.

Chicago north suburbs and S. wisconsin location.

Thanks

If you have amassed a sizable 401k, I donít think an advisor would suite you as youíve made it work thus far.

Lifeleadership
02-06-2018, 07:48 PM
Hi there,

I just happen to come across this post regarding a financial advisor and I truly believe it is worthy of consideration to hire someone.

As a major airline guy, I've been utilizing a company by the name of Smith Anglin for over 2 years now. I can't say enough great things about this company. I called them based on a recommendation from the fellow pilot who had great things to say about them and they actually traveled to Florida, came to my home and spent two and a half hours with my wife and I.

Over the last couple years I've seen some great returns more so than had I done my own investing, and more importantly as fiduciaries they have my best interest in mind. They keep an eye on my portfolio every minute of the day so they maximize my returns and minimize any potential losses.

They've been in business a long time. Give them a call and see what happens. The point of contact for this company is a gentleman by the name of Weston Pollock. 2146162664

You will like them.

Ben


grouperking
03-13-2018, 08:47 PM
I tend to agree with fourpaw in that if youíve done well for yourself, why pay a hefty advisor fee for no reason. Check out the guys at EZTracker401k. They have company specific 401k newsletters and an ETF one too if you roll your 401k into a brokerage IRA. For just a few bucks a month they have helped me stay on track with my money. Good luck

Original Intent
06-11-2018, 09:37 AM
Retirement planning firm started by a guy that flies for a regional and has years of experience as a CFP. www.cavuretirement.com (https://www.cavuretirement.com)

Excargodog
06-11-2018, 09:26 PM
Spend an hour a night reading decent financial books for a few weeks in your hotel room and you can handle it yourself far better than the vast majority of investment firms. Hiring an investment advisor means that the investment return you would otherwise be getting is going to be decreased on the average by between 20 and 25% of what you would have otherwise made if you had just put it all in an index 500 fund at Vanguard and just let it ride.

742Dash
06-12-2018, 06:57 AM
Spend an hour a night reading decent financial books for a few weeks in your hotel room and you can handle it yourself far better than the vast majority of investment firms. Hiring an investment advisor means that the investment return you would otherwise be getting is going to be decreased on the average by between 20 and 25% of what you would have otherwise made if you had just put it all in an index 500 fund at Vanguard and just let it ride.

That works well during your younger years while accumulating. A basic asset allocation model, fill it with index funds/ETFs. Done.

However it starts getting more complicated as retirement nears. Mitigating sequence of returns risk and longevity risk are not simple things for an individual retail investor to manage.

Excargodog
06-12-2018, 08:16 PM
That works well during your younger years while accumulating. A basic asset allocation model, fill it with index funds/ETFs. Done.

However it starts getting more complicated as retirement nears. Mitigating sequence of returns risk and longevity risk are not simple things for an individual retail investor to manage.


Not really. Anyone who can't manage the retirement funds they were smart enough to accumulate without the additional overhead of a financial advisor certainly can't manage it WITH the additional overhead.

742Dash
06-13-2018, 06:31 AM
Not really. Anyone who can't manage the retirement funds they were smart enough to accumulate without the additional overhead of a financial advisor certainly can't manage it WITH the additional overhead.

OK, so let me ask you a question. Given a 65 year old with 1.5 million in retirement savings. How should he mitigate sequence of returns risk?

SonicFlyer
06-13-2018, 08:01 AM
I highly recommend this guy... he doesn't just do your investments for you, he teaches you what he does so that you can understand how your money is being handled, and why:



https://www.paulwinkler.com

Tummy
06-13-2018, 04:59 PM
OK, so let me ask you a question. Given a 65 year old with 1.5 million in retirement savings. How should he mitigate sequence of returns risk?

Live on $60,000 per year.

Stocks ? Part XIII: The 4% rule, withdrawal rates and how much can I spend anyway? (http://jlcollinsnh.com/2012/12/07/stocks-part-xiii-withdrawal-rates-how-much-can-i-spend-anyway/)

This would allow one to pay $0 in taxes.

https://www.gocurrycracker.com/never-pay-taxes-again/

Allocate your portfolio as follows:

75% - Total Stock Market Index Fund
20% - Total Bond Market Index Fund
5% - Money Market Fund

Stocks ? Part VI: Portfolio ideas to build and keep your wealth (http://jlcollinsnh.com/2012/05/12/stocks-part-vi-portfolio-ideas-to-build-and-keep-your-wealth/)

Next question?

Stocks ? Part IX: Why I don?t like investment advisors (http://jlcollinsnh.com/2012/06/06/why-i-dont-like-investment-advisors/)

Excargodog
06-13-2018, 05:33 PM
OK, so let me ask you a question. Given a 65 year old with 1.5 million in retirement savings. How should he mitigate sequence of returns risk?


https://www.forbes.com/sites/wadepfau/2017/04/12/4-approaches-to-managing-sequence-of-returns-risk-in-retirement/#f8847e76fcf3


This isn't rocket science. If you are smart enough to do a weight and balance you are smart enough to manage your own financial affairs.

Moreover, if yu have so fouled up your retirement that you are unable to manage it, you certainly won't be helped by paying out 2% a year for someone else to take over the sinking ship.

742Dash
06-14-2018, 04:49 AM
https://www.forbes.com/sites/wadepfau/2017/04/12/4-approaches-to-managing-sequence-of-returns-risk-in-retirement/#f8847e76fcf3


This isn't rocket science. If you are smart enough to do a weight and balance you are smart enough to manage your own financial affairs.

Moreover, if yu have so fouled up your retirement that you are unable to manage it, you certainly won't be helped by paying out 2% a year for someone else to take over the sinking ship.

Forbes?

And my retirement is just fine, thank you very much for your concern.

Nor do I care much for financial advisers. But this idea that this is a simple process is going to end disastrously for a majority of people.

742Dash
06-14-2018, 04:53 AM
Live on $60,000 per year.

Stocks ? Part XIII: The 4% rule, withdrawal rates and how much can I spend anyway? (http://jlcollinsnh.com/2012/12/07/stocks-part-xiii-withdrawal-rates-how-much-can-i-spend-anyway/)

This would allow one to pay $0 in taxes.

https://www.gocurrycracker.com/never-pay-taxes-again/

Allocate your portfolio as follows:

75% - Total Stock Market Index Fund
20% - Total Bond Market Index Fund
5% - Money Market Fund

Stocks ? Part VI: Portfolio ideas to build and keep your wealth (http://jlcollinsnh.com/2012/05/12/stocks-part-vi-portfolio-ideas-to-build-and-keep-your-wealth/)

Next question?

Stocks ? Part IX: Why I don?t like investment advisors (http://jlcollinsnh.com/2012/06/06/why-i-dont-like-investment-advisors/)

We are in a world where CAPE is at 32.99 and the 10 year treasury is at 2.94%. 4% for anyone nearing retirement is extremely optimistic.

I am not a fan of financial advisors, but neither am I a fan of simplistic financial advice.

I suggest that you look to academic papers on this subject. Pfau is a good starting point.

Tummy
06-14-2018, 07:12 AM
I suggest that you look to academic papers on this subject.

I have.

For instance, the following study is linked in the first link I posted:

https://www.onefpa.org/journal/Pages/Portfolio%20Success%20Rates%20Where%20to%20Draw%20 the%20Line.aspx

Everyone should read it.

742Dash
06-14-2018, 07:32 AM
I have.

For instance, the following study is linked in the first link I posted:

https://www.onefpa.org/journal/Pages/Portfolio%20Success%20Rates%20Where%20to%20Draw%20 the%20Line.aspx

Everyone should read it.

The problem with the Trinity Study is that it is based on historical data. Which would be fine, except that there is no historical precedent for today's high valuations/low interest rates.

We are all in uncharted territory.

flap
06-14-2018, 04:29 PM
Hi there,

I just happen to come across this post regarding a financial advisor and I truly believe it is worthy of consideration to hire someone.

As a major airline guy, I've been utilizing a company by the name of Smith Anglin for over 2 years now. I can't say enough great things about this company. I called them based on a recommendation from the fellow pilot who had great things to say about them and they actually traveled to Florida, came to my home and spent two and a half hours with my wife and I.

Over the last couple years I've seen some great returns more so than had I done my own investing, and more importantly as fiduciaries they have my best interest in mind. They keep an eye on my portfolio every minute of the day so they maximize my returns and minimize any potential losses.

They've been in business a long time. Give them a call and see what happens. The point of contact for this company is a gentleman by the name of Weston Pollock. 2146162664

You will like them.

Ben

I would love to know the annual fees you pay for his service, and more importantly, if you even know.

Many are 1% advisors and that is an annual fee of $15,000 on a 1.5 million dollar portfolio

For that amount of money, he should be making. Monthly trips to see you

As for returns, a good return is only good if it is appropriate for the risk taken in the underlying investments. Getting a 20%. Annual return with a portfolio that should return 30% given the risk profile is not a good thing

Furthermore, many advisors put you into high fee funds that could easily milk you out of tens of thousands of dollars

Having an advisor on a per hour charge to do a gross error check once a year is a great idea
Do it quarterly and spend a grand

Buy extra time for estate ideas, SS optimization and longevity issues

Much better than paying them a percentage age of assets and get expensive funds

We receive complaints annually from pilots using advisors that charge rediculous fees and underperform

Understand your performance benchmarks, and always compare net of fees

Excargodog
06-16-2018, 12:48 PM
Forbes?

And my retirement is just fine, thank you very much for your concern.

Nor do I care much for financial advisers. But this idea that this is a simple process is going to end disastrously for a majority of people.

Pleased to hear your retirement investing is doing fine. So's mine. And investing for retirement actually IS a simple process, that most often goes awry because people either don't do it at all do it inadequately, or trust it to a "financial advisor who has my best interests at heart."

This ain't rocket science guys, if you can fly an aircraft you can damn sure manage your own finances without giving up 1-2% of your annual investments to someone who can only make his/her money by taking it from you.

742Dash
06-17-2018, 09:29 AM
Pleased to hear your retirement investing is doing fine. So's mine. And investing for retirement actually IS a simple process, that most often goes awry because people either don't do it at all do it inadequately, or trust it to a "financial advisor who has my best interests at heart."

This ain't rocket science guys, if you can fly an aircraft you can damn sure manage your own finances without giving up 1-2% of your annual investments to someone who can only make his/her money by taking it from you.

OK, lets try this one more time.

Investing FOR retirement is easy, but it is very different from investing IN retirement. Sequence of returns risk is everything in the later case, and I suspect that the majority of those who are confident about their investing ability don't even know what it is. I also suspect that the majority of those who are confident do not know what CAPE is, let alone what where it is currently (hint -- at a point with no historical precedent). Add bond ladders to the list.

It is difficult to find a good adviser, but they are out there and they are fee based, not percentage based.

Blogs, general web sites and news letters are very much like percentage based advisers. They need your business/clicks, and they get it by telling you what you want to hear. They can do as much damage to a portfolio as a Northwestern Mutual Financial Representative.

There are good reasons for people to be seeking competent financial advisers. Index funds are simple and great during the accumulation phase, positioning yourself for income when entering retirement is another thing. Disparaging people who seek such guidance, while maintaining that all of this is "easy", does not come across well and does a great disservice to your fellow pilots.

I do my own financial management, but it has taken a lot more than a few books on overnights to get to the point where I feel that I can manage it into retirement. I also do my own automotive maintenance (all of it), but the same thing applies. I do not criticize those who seek professional service in both areas. At the same time I seek professionals in those areas that I don't have interest/experience with.

I am sure that there are people who will tell me that replacing the electrical breaker panel in my house is easy. Maybe it is. But given my skill set and the risks involved, I gladly paid an electrician.

Excargodog
06-17-2018, 09:58 AM
OK, lets try this one more time.

..... I suspect that the majority of those who are confident about their investing ability don't even know what it is. I also suspect that the majority of those who are confident do not know what CAPE is, let alone what where it is currently (hint -- at a point with no historical precedent). Add bond ladders to the list.

It is difficult to find a good adviser, but they are out there .....

Even were I to accept your assertion that good financial decisions are somehow beyond the competence of most pilots (which I do not) then I would need to accept your assertion that these same "incompetent" pilots ARE somehow competent to discern which of the many financial advisers out there is one of the "good" advisors that you yourself say are "difficult to find." Do you perhaps begin to detect the inherent circular flaw in the logic of your assertion?



There are good reasons for people to be seeking competent financial advisers. Index funds are simple and great during the accumulation phase, positioning yourself for income when entering retirement is another thing. Disparaging people who seek such guidance, while maintaining that all of this is "easy", does not come across well and does a great disservice to your fellow pilots.

"I do my own financial management, but it has taken a lot more than a few books on overnights to get to the point where I feel that I can manage it into retirement. I also do my own automotive maintenance (all of it), but the same thing applies. I do not criticize those who seek professional service in both areas. At the same time I seek professionals in those areas that I don't have interest/experience with."

I understand. You can do YOUR own investing, and scatter pearls to the rest of us swine, but anyone else saying different is doing people a "disservice" because, gosh, who else out there could be as bright and as knowledgeable as you.


I am sure that there are people who will tell me that replacing the electrical breaker panel in my house is easy. Maybe it is. But given my skill set and the risks involved, I gladly paid an electrician.

Yet you are admittedly ignorant enough that you feel incompetent to handle single phase 240 volt AC current wiring in accordance with widely published wiring codes, even though the city, county, or state electrical inspector will personally check it before it is energized. Go figure.

742Dash
06-17-2018, 11:33 AM
Even were I to accept your assertion that good financial decisions are somehow beyond the competence of most pilots (which I do not) then I would need to accept your assertion that these same "incompetent" pilots ARE somehow competent to discern which of the many financial advisers out there is one of the "good" advisors that you yourself say are "difficult to find." Do you perhaps begin to detect the inherent circular flaw in the logic of your assertion?




I understand. You can do YOUR own investing, and scatter pearls to the rest of us swine, but anyone else saying different is doing people a "disservice" because, gosh, who else out there could be as bright and as knowledgeable as you.



Yet you are admittedly ignorant enough that you feel incompetent to handle single phase 240 volt AC current wiring in accordance with widely published wiring codes, even though the city, county, or state electrical inspector will personally check it before it is energized. Go figure.


That clarifies a great deal.

Stimpy the Kat
06-17-2018, 12:41 PM
Gentleman and Ladies,

Here is ALL you need to know about Retirement Planning:

> You wanna' live on 60k(?)

> e.g - Multiply that times 30 years and,

> Get yourself $1.8 million

> Assume 3% Growth ( Just keeping up with below). Very conservative investment.

> Assume 3% inflation.

> S.S. at Age 62

> Retire at 60.

Statistically, You ain't even gonna' make it to 80 , let alone 90....So, Party On.

If you make a few percent here and there you'll STILL leave a Butt-Load of money on the table for people who never really even knew you....Yet, not One Penny for The Leeches / Advisors.

:)


Stimpson J. Kat - Esquire

( Happily Crabby Old Man )


P.S. - The above ( Bad Case Scenario ) would leave your Heirs approx. $ 975, 000 IF you make it to 90. Much more otherwise.

P.P.S - Dave, I agree with your analysis also. I like SIMPLE though. YKW. :)

JennHinn
07-25-2018, 08:32 AM
Hi All, I am a retirement planner and financial coach. I work with a CPA and a FR who also is a pilot with Jet Blue. We work with individuals to help map out the best plan for their future and goals. I am happy to offer consultations to anyone who would like to learn more about planning for their retirement. Feel free to message or call 239-789-1355 ! Happy Flying!!

Cherokee6300
12-18-2018, 07:43 AM
Merely throwing my name in the hat. 20 years of investment experience and dozens of pilot clients.

We want to win. We have a passion for wealth management and helping high-performers achieve long-term financial success.

Give me a shout (in the office or in the air)

Home | The Rudd Company, LLC (http://www.theruddcompany.com/)



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