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joshuatrees
01-21-2018, 01:02 PM
Hello. I just have a quick question for you commercial pilots out there: What is the difference between High & Low Altitude enroute Jeppesen charts? Is the Low altitude ones for GA aircraft and High altitude for commercial aircraft? Thanks guys.


Twin Wasp
01-21-2018, 01:12 PM
Would it be too simple to say high altitude charts for aircraft operating at high altitudes and low altitude charts are for aircraft operating at low altitudes?

joshuatrees
01-21-2018, 01:23 PM
Would it be too simple to say high altitude charts for aircraft operating at high altitudes and low altitude charts are for aircraft operating at low altitudes?

Makes sense I guess. Kinda confused about when I'd need either the high/low ones. Pardon my ignorance. I'm assuming you use the low altitude charts until you reach a certain high altitude, then you'd take out the low altitude charts vise versa?


echelon
01-21-2018, 01:28 PM
Makes sense I guess. Kinda confused about when I'd need either the high/low ones. Pardon my ignorance. I'm assuming you use the low altitude charts until you reach a certain high altitude, then you'd take out the low altitude charts vise versa?

I mean for a practical answer to your question... I've never actually looked at an enroute chart flying for the airlines. When we still had to carry paper ones, they were only ever used to block sunlight.

TonyC
01-21-2018, 01:43 PM
HINT: Have you ever heard of Victor airways and Jet routes?






.

galaxy flyer
01-21-2018, 01:44 PM
In jets, I pretty much used the High charts all the time; SID get you close enough to the high structure and the STAR starts in the high structure. Not often do we fly in the low structure long enough to use the low charts. Mostly the high charts are for the myriad of “ball notes “ associated with FIR boundaries.

GF

FL370esq
01-21-2018, 01:51 PM
Kinda confused about when I'd need either the high/low ones.

FL180/18,000' is your basic cutoff.
Below FL180 (depending on transition level/altimeter setting), you fly "Victor" routes/airways (i.e., V483) and would therefore use the low enroute charts. At or above FL180 (based on transition altitude/altimeter settings) you would be flying "Jet" routes (i.e., J55) and therefore would use the high enroute charts.

Simple enough?

Deathwish
01-21-2018, 01:52 PM
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airway_(aviation)

SunDevilPilot
01-21-2018, 01:55 PM
Hello. I just have a quick question for you commercial pilots out there: What is the difference between High & Low Altitude enroute Jeppesen charts? Is the Low altitude ones for GA aircraft and High altitude for commercial aircraft? Thanks guys.Low Enroute Charts would be for Victor and Tango (RNAV) airways, which are only found below 18,000 MSL. High Charts are what you would use when operating from FL180 up to FL600, which would be the Jet and Quebec (RNAV) routes. The AIM is full of the little trivia factoids like this. Recommend reading through it at full at least once.

joshuatrees
01-22-2018, 03:14 PM
FL180/18,000' is your basic cutoff.
Below FL180 (depending on transition level/altimeter setting), you fly "Victor" routes/airways (i.e., V483) and would therefore use the low enroute charts. At or above FL180 (based on transition altitude/altimeter settings) you would be flying "Jet" routes (i.e., J55) and therefore would use the high enroute charts.

Simple enough?

Yes, Thank you! :) :D

joshuatrees
01-22-2018, 03:15 PM
Thank you all for your replies. I'm not confused anymore :cool: