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View Full Version : Jump or get off the pot...


ViperGuy69
01-29-2018, 08:30 AM
Anyone else out there on the fence about retiring/going airlines vs staying in the AF another tour and taking the pilot bonus?

I have the option to stay in T-38 land another 3-4 years and take the ďold guyĒ pilot bonus ($35-50k per year depending on FY18 announcement). The good: itís my wifeís home town, Iím home every night and almost every weekend, I can help take care of my in-laws who have medical issues, kids are established in jr high and high school, and the short-term bonus money would be great. The bad: Iím burned out on the AF and will probably end up getting tagged for a 6-month deployment at some point.

I know right now is a great time to jump into the airline hiring wave, and my seniority would move quickly over the next 3-4 years, giving me a better schedule and great pay. Iím competitive for the majors but wondering if the QOL as an airline guy is really worth the money while the kiddos are still at home. I would be commuting for the first 6 years at least until my youngest goes to college (unless I get hired by AA and could sit LC from DFW).

Anybody make the leap recently and wish theyíd stayed in?

Thanks!


JTwift
01-29-2018, 09:11 AM
As a recently retired (last year) guy that hasn't had things work out the way I'd hoped/planned, I'm just going to throw out some thoughts in no particular order. I hope you don't mind one more time with bullet points! Some of this will overlap what you wrote, but I'm just typing here....

I'm also going to try and get this in before you get eight people telling you how much seniority and future income you're going to lose out on.

- I know quite a few military who got hired at Majors. I know quite a few military who didn't (interviewed, not hired). I'm one of those guys. Interviewed at two, not hired at either. Do I suck at interviews? Maybe. I dunno. I thought I did ok, but apparently it wasn't enough. But that's ok....keep reading.

- You can always apply and put a "future availability" date of 8 months, or some such. If you get the call, then you have the decision to make. If you don't, then the decision is made for you.

- With the airlines, you will be gone. You will not be home every night. However, you also won't be doing 6 months at a time. This is going to entirely depend on your family. It may actually be easier on them to know you're doing one 6-monther instead of dealing with multiple 3-5 days every month. Only you can answer this.

- Getting the retirement is key. It gives you tons of options and a nice safety net, plus bonuses (ID card, Tricare, etc). If you were at 17 years, I'd argue to stay, but since you're at 20+, you're there. yay!

- You can be an airline pilot from anywhere. You just have to decide if the commute is worth it. I don't know which T-38 base you're at, but it could be a hellish commute, depending on the base you're assigned. Probably at least a two-hopper with only a few flights a day.

- I understand being burned out. When I retired, the biggest shock to me was (drum roll), being able to go somewhere without having to be on a pass or take leave, or let anyone know where I was going. I could load up my family, drive to wherever, and just do it all on a whim. No boss calling, no permission slips....it's like you're an adult again. I also haven't had to endure any Red Dot videos. Bonus.

- The pilot hiring wave is just starting. Yes, I know you'll miss out on a few years, but if it helps stabilize your family, get you a nice bonus, plus a few more 2.5% additives to your retirement check, that isn't such a bad deal, in my opinion. This one rests entirely on your family situation, in my opinion.

- So, to back up some of my points.....I ended up at a Regional for a little bit, but quit because sitting reserve in NYC for $30, while paying for a crashpad + meals, being away from home 20+ days a month...it wasn't worth it to me. Airline flying was fine, I guess. It's just about zero percent exciting, but that isn't why people do it (they do it for the money and, ancillary, for the love of flying). The biggest hit was my family. My son is right at the age where, after 20 years of military and being gone a lot, he just wants me around. He would cry every night I was gone. I figured that I'd rather not be on my deathbed and regret all those (additional) missed days/nights just so I could have more seniority and a bit more money. Not worth it to me.

In a few years, when he's grown and away, I may try again. We'll see. It's certainly not the life for everyone. Living out of a bag, hotel rooms, cab rides, crashpads, airports, over and over.....meh.

If I had gotten hired by one of the Majors I interviewed with, I'm sure I would have sucked it up and stuck with it. But, it seems a bit like a silver lining.

In the mean time, I got hired to teach the simulator for a corporate jet. It keeps me around aviation, I enjoy instructing, it's a fun new plane, and I get to be home every night. I won't get rich doing it, but that's fine. Between it and my retirement/disability pay, I'm about equal, or slightly over where I was when I was active duty, and that was comfortable living.

So....do with that information as you wish. You have some thinking to do.

Hit me up, either here or PM, if you have any more questions.

Sliceback
01-29-2018, 09:29 AM
SW is also a DFW option but the Big 3 have better career projections.

UA IAH is a fairly easy commute and drivable in a pinch.

Bailout, bailout, boom.... and then stay in the reserves and get a mil retirement. If youíve got 20 yrs in I think the majority of the guys whoíve gone the mil to airline route would say leave.

Every month delayed takes away $25-30K per month minus your current pay and retirement pay not taken between AD DOS and age 60.

As well as getting hired 1000-4000 guys more junior. Minimum increase in your final number at AA of approximately 500-600. 1600 vs perhaps <1000. Thatís a lot of bidding horsepower, the difference between being a 777/787 CA junior line holder and reserve.

Youíre looking at 1.5-2 yrs commuting back to DFW if you got on with AA. The problem is we donít get to pick the airline, they pick us.

First year pay, without membership in the check a month club, is tougher. Roughly $80K. Second yr roughly $130K, third year $130-170K depending upon rsv vs a hustling line holder. Rsv annual income is basically 90% of your hourly rate ($88= $80K) and a line holder can easily get 100-110% ($150/hr = up to $165K annual)


Sliceback
01-29-2018, 09:42 AM
Youíll never get tacked for an X month deployment. Your days off are exactly that - O.F.F. Ask an FO they had to talk with their supervisor - ďuh, what you talking about?!?!Ē As a Captain the last time I was called by my CP was maybe 15-25 yrs ago? It just doesnít happen for 97-99% Iíd tje guys. Do your job and go home. Done.

Youíll have to commute for at least 1-2 yrs, and maybe youíre entire career, but guys have chosen that option for decades. Some commute because they get to live in their home town, amongst their extended families, forever. But commuting isn't free. It eats into your time off, but if momma is happy...

And if you canít get a major job before your DOS get a regional job. $50-60K with bonuses but your objective is to bail before you qualify for all the bonuses. Donít do an ISR job. Go get 121 qualified. Start learning the new environment.

Lead turn is easily 6-10 months to get hired. APC has a stick thread about lead turning the transition. From first contact with pilot recruitment to training start is 3-6 months. So if you want to start at a major in May you need to be contacted now.

Good luck.

SaltyDog
01-29-2018, 10:44 AM
...QOL as an airline guy is really worth the money while the kiddos are still at home. I would be commuting for the first 6 years at least until my youngest goes to college (unless I get hired by AA and could sit LC from DFW).

Anybody make the leap recently and wish theyíd stayed in?


JTwift has a good and real perspective. Had a friend that ended up corporate after doing instructing like JT is doing, and he truly enjoys his new life (been doing it for several years now) after thinking he wanted airlines. All worked out.

Sounds like family is in good position for you to stay USAF. Worse things than flying a T-38 for a few more years. Airline life will challenge your time with the family and the medical needs of your family if commuting.
Downside. You do give up seniority but if doing so after the kids are mostly out of the house, then just you and your wife have to absorb the change and doable.
I bailed off AD at a time when everyone was furloughing. Most thought I was duummmmbbbb to bail out. Probably, but it worked out. Took awhile, but all is well.

Castle Bravo
01-29-2018, 03:09 PM
If you're at 19 or 20+ yrs, put yer papers in and PUNCH! Life is Good on the outside.

If you're at 16+ yrs, consider transferring the GI Bill to the kiddos. It can be absolutely amazing when combined with the Yellow Ribbon. Like, jaw dropping. It's a 4 yr commitment to xfer, but worth it if you want at least one kid to go to school for free.

Retirement brings steady pay, benefits, and (relative to airline plans) absurdly cheap Tricare health coverage. Many guys pay $600 or more a month for coverage with their company. That adds up.

If you're at 15 years or less, PUNCH and join a reserve/guard unit so that retired pay kicks in eventually.

YMMV. Good luck.

trip
01-30-2018, 05:50 AM
I'd stay for family. Commuting will suck the benefits of airline life out fast. The airlines will still be around when your ready.

Sliceback
01-30-2018, 06:51 AM
I'd stay for family. Commuting will suck the benefits of airline life out fast. The airlines will still be around when your ready.

If you get a major job are you moving right away or commuting?
Or when you got your major job did you move or commute?

Few people move to their first assignment. They just commute for the first 6 to 24 months.

PRS Guitars
01-30-2018, 07:48 AM
You need to take the long view on this. If you are going to be an airline pilot...then do it now. If youíre unsure about it then thatís a different story.

I left a very cushy AD job as a PIT IP. Put papers in in 2013 with no jobs lined up. Got on with a major just in time and got a reserve job. Made $40 an hour my first year at the airline, had no retirement but a reserve job. Commuted to both jobs (still do, though trying to reduce to one). With all that said, Iíve never regretted it, for me the grass was/ is greener.

Your first year will suck, itís an adjustment. Take the long view though. Imagine yourself in 3 years. Youíll likely have weekends off and a decent schedule, making $150 to $200k, living a nice life with more time with your family than you are accustomed too now. Or...youíll be a brand new FO, with 2000 guys senior to you most of which are younger (not good). Now imagine yourself in 20 years, thatís where those younger and senior guys really effect you.

Iíve seen you ask some good questions on the AA side, but please donít factor any of that stuff into your decision matrix as to wether to jump ship now or later. For your first 18 months, your commute/equipment/type of trips/profit sharing/where you can sit reserve from (by the way, you can sit LC from anywhere you want!) etc donít matter. Youíre not doing this job for the QOL offered in the first 18 months, rather youíre enduring the first 18 months to have a fantastic job over the next 20 to 25 years. The payoff is later.

One other thing, look into retired reserves, speak to your local reserve Squadron today about it! Iím assuming the 5th, maybe the 97th (not sure exactly where you are.

Iím sending you a PM as well.

Sputnik
01-31-2018, 09:17 AM
I read the post and feel like what you are saying is that you want to stay in, life is good and it'd be great to continue as is. And if that's how you feel, by all means stay in. Your family will love it and possibly you will too. The airlines will still be there in 3 years.

What gives me some pause was the following:


The bad: Iím burned out on the AF


Everyone knows someone who stayed one assignment too many. Whether they were good guys or not, their unhappiness with the decision to stay in bled over into the squadron.

Ultimately the reason I punched was that I didn't want to be that guy. Was enjoying AF till the day I left, but I knew deep down it was time. Wanted to go out on a high note.

Granted, I'm basing all of this on one post. I don't think there is a right answer, you will be ok either way.

As others have alluded, airline first year can be rough. I was pretty miserable that year, now in my 4th year I'm glad I sucked it up. A good friend quit during OE (no longer flying at all), he is glad too.

F15andMD11
02-01-2018, 04:11 AM
...unless I get hired by AA and could sit LC from DFW... All mil guys considering the airlines get this idea out of your head. It won't happen, sitting long call (LC) that is. LC is a starting and ending point in your reserve period. In the middle you will be on SC / airport stby at your base. Maybe at airline X there are entire LC months you can bid on, I'd imagine those would go pretty senior. Not available to a new hire. Also once you switch equipment you're back to a "new hire," reserve schedule, just paid better. Assuming you move to new equipment at first opportunity and are at the bottom of the equipment list.
Now someone will post that they've been on LC since they were hired and how awesome it is.:D

Spike from flyi
02-01-2018, 04:44 AM
Your job shouldnít drive your happiness. Youíve seen advice from both sides, here. If you donít have check of the month club, donít punch out until you do. Itís a great opportunity, now; but airline pilot jobs will suck again in the future. You can take that to the bank.

rickair7777
02-01-2018, 07:23 AM
All mil guys considering the airlines get this idea out of your head. It won't happen, sitting long call (LC) that is. LC is a starting and ending point in your reserve period. In the middle you will be on SC / airport stby at your base. Maybe at airline X there are entire LC months you can bid on, I'd imagine those would go pretty senior. Not available to a new hire. Also once you switch equipment you're back to a "new hire," reserve schedule, just paid better. Assuming you move to new equipment at first opportunity and are at the bottom of the equipment list.
Now someone will post that they've been on LC since they were hired and how awesome it is.:D

LC is going to either a) suck, or b) go very senior.

Typically it sucks. They will use LC first for anything which is known in advance (saving SC for last-minute sick calls which LC can't cover). They also can typically convert you to short call X number of days per month, and they will.

So you're either flying or sitting SC. LC might be useful if SC is under-utilized and you don't want to travel to base and spend every weeks sitting in a pad.

PRS Guitars
02-01-2018, 02:51 PM
LC is going to either a) suck, or b) go very senior.

Typically it sucks. They will use LC first for anything which is known in advance (saving SC for last-minute sick calls which LC can't cover). They also can typically convert you to short call X number of days per month, and they will.

So you're either flying or sitting SC. LC might be useful if SC is under-utilized and you don't want to travel to base and spend every weeks sitting in a pad.

Actually not the case at all for me at American. I often choose to sit LC. I stay at home on call and have always commuted over 1,000 miles.

This all varies by base and bid status so YMMV:
One can usually get LC within 1 to 6 months (95 to 99%). At 73% I’ve found that I can hold long call and get any day of the month off that I want (except Christimas which takes about 50%). We sit LC for 18 days, and I’ve averaged working about 12 days blocking about 50 to 60 hours. The most of I’ve ever worked was 15 days and I went over gaurentee doing it. I only worked 11 hours (one “milk run” red eye) in December. I was probably transitioned to SC 3 times last year.

I usually sit LC and work my 6 USAFR days on my days off, which leaves me 6 days off at home plus unused reserve days (usually another 6 or so. Its worked out pretty well. I do mix it up a bit and take longer or shorter mil stints once and a while.

I think it goes jr because guys need to make more than 73 hours to pay the bills and save for retirement.

I guess this is one area that AA is good at...:cool:

AFTrainerGuy
02-02-2018, 10:24 AM
LC is going to either a) suck, or b) go very senior.

Typically it sucks. They will use LC first for anything which is known in advance (saving SC for last-minute sick calls which LC can't cover). They also can typically convert you to short call X number of days per month, and they will.

So you're either flying or sitting SC. LC might be useful if SC is under-utilized and you don't want to travel to base and spend every weeks sitting in a pad.

I almost didnít want to respond, because I think you and F15andMD11 make good points a lot and I agree with almost everything yaíll post.

But, I think LC varies by airline to airline. My experience exactly mimics PRSís. Iíve sat LC living in base for almost 4 years now. It took me about 6 months to get it, and Iíve never done anything else since. This year, I was able to complete all my Reserve stuff on my OFF days without ever dropping even a day of Mil Leave. I looked just to present facts. Last year, I worked 110 days with 72 overnights. I was converted to SC only 3 times.

Just so guys get a fair look...This month, the last line of LC went 3 from the bottom in CLT. Just looking at the bottom 10% in this Base (#550-611 on Airbus), 22 were awarded LC, 20 were awarded lines, and the other 39 got SC.

What you say may be true where you work, but I feel you guys are making blanket statements. Every airline and every base will vary, but at least at AA, a newhire can expect to sit LC very quickly and also expect to be awarded a line relatively quickly if they do choose. Of course, things can and will always change, but for now, this is true here

Hacker15e
02-02-2018, 04:06 PM
Anybody make the leap recently and wish theyíd stayed in?


Among all the other noise out there, this is the part you have to pay attention to.

I don't know anywhere -- either on the internet or out there in real life -- where there is a big chorus of guys who've retired (or even separated prior to 20) and gone to the airlines and are saying, "man, I wish I'd stayed in."

Yeah, there are singletons who've had a bad experience here or there, but the vast, vast majority of guys are happy that they've closed the Big Blue chapter of their professional career and have moved on.

That speaks volumes in and of itself.

Castle Bravo
02-02-2018, 04:22 PM
"Hey, you're working SOF tomorrow night."
"Hey, you've got the midnight shift all week for this exercise."
"Hey, where are you slides for the staff mtg?"
"Hey, Boss wants you to be pro-jo for the spouses charity auction next month."
"Hey, also, Boss wants you to get some face time with General Pot Belly next week; go to Protocol and build the itinerary."
"Hey sir, scheduling here, Boss says you're on probation because you didn't fly enough non-precisions last month." <But I was TDY to a conference!>
"Hey, you're overdue on your Trafficking In Humans Computer Based Trng, so your Leave in cancelled until that's done."
"Hey, how come you didn't submit any Amn of the Month award packages on your troops?" <But I was TDY to a conference!>
"Are you going to the NCO Induction banquet Tuesday night? You were a no-show last month..."
"Hey, I know it's not likely, but just in case we get tasked, can you look at 3 different Courses of Actions and brief them to the Boss?"
"Hey, don't forget your Kevlar and Helmet for the nightly rocket and mortar attacks. But make sure your Reflective belt is on too."

If I'm lying, I'm dying...


I posted this elsewhere, but as Hacker says...if you punch, you just won't have to put up with this stuff any longer.
You just fly and...go home.

John Carr
02-02-2018, 11:15 PM
I almost didnít want to respond, because I think you and F15andMD11 make good points a lot and I agree with almost everything yaíll post.

But, I think LC varies by airline to airline. My experience exactly mimics PRSís. Iíve sat LC living in base for almost 4 years now. It took me about 6 months to get it, and Iíve never done anything else since. This year, I was able to complete all my Reserve stuff on my OFF days without ever dropping even a day of Mil Leave. I looked just to present facts. Last year, I worked 110 days with 72 overnights. I was converted to SC only 3 times.

Just so guys get a fair look...This month, the last line of LC went 3 from the bottom in CLT. Just looking at the bottom 10% in this Base (#550-611 on Airbus), 22 were awarded LC, 20 were awarded lines, and the other 39 got SC.

What you say may be true where you work, but I feel you guys are making blanket statements. Every airline and every base will vary, but at least at AA, a newhire can expect to sit LC very quickly and also expect to be awarded a line relatively quickly if they do choose. Of course, things can and will always change, but for now, this is true here

Echo the above.

Depends on the airline, THEN fleet type.

JTwift
02-03-2018, 04:52 AM
I posted this elsewhere, but as Hacker says...if you punch, you just won't have to put up with this stuff any longer.
You just fly and...go home.

Don't forget my original example.

"Hey, honey...want to go somewhere for the weekend?"

"Sure! ....don't you need to call your boss or something and let them know?"

"Nope."

Sliceback
02-03-2018, 07:21 AM
Don't forget my original example.

"Hey, honey...want to go somewhere for the weekend?"

"Sure! ....don't you need to call your boss or something and let them know?"

"Nope."

Conversation this morning about various vacation plans/options for the this year. Six different options over three, or more, time periods. The limiting factor is being able to bid the time off over the end of month transition. Will I be able to get 5 or perhaps as much as 10, if not more, days off in a row? How much I get, and in what months, will start ticking off the different options. Hawaii or Aruba? Iceland or cruise? Or Portugal or yacht charter? Or....

It requires some short range flexibility because you only have about two weeks notice as to how many days you get off in the following month. But it's a vacation option that always exists. Twelve months a year. To realistically maximize your 'vacation' breaks it's only available five times a year. That's before you take any regular vacation or use your regular vacation to extend the end of month transition 'vacations'. Early on you get 2 opportunities to extend the mini vacations for 2-3 weeks, after approx. 10 yrs you get 3-4 vacation weeks.

The reality is with young children, or a wife who doesn't have scheduling flexibility, you're limited to more traditional vacation breaks. As a junior guy they can be hard to get which is why some guys choose seniority vs switching to larger aircraft or upgrading.

rickair7777
02-03-2018, 12:55 PM
I almost didnít want to respond, because I think you and F15andMD11 make good points a lot and I agree with almost everything yaíll post.

But, I think LC varies by airline to airline. My experience exactly mimics PRSís. Iíve sat LC living in base for almost 4 years now. It took me about 6 months to get it, and Iíve never done anything else since. This year, I was able to complete all my Reserve stuff on my OFF days without ever dropping even a day of Mil Leave. I looked just to present facts. Last year, I worked 110 days with 72 overnights. I was converted to SC only 3 times.

Just so guys get a fair look...This month, the last line of LC went 3 from the bottom in CLT. Just looking at the bottom 10% in this Base (#550-611 on Airbus), 22 were awarded LC, 20 were awarded lines, and the other 39 got SC.

What you say may be true where you work, but I feel you guys are making blanket statements. Every airline and every base will vary, but at least at AA, a newhire can expect to sit LC very quickly and also expect to be awarded a line relatively quickly if they do choose. Of course, things can and will always change, but for now, this is true here

I stand corrected then, glad to hear it works out for you.

F15andMD11
02-03-2018, 06:59 PM
I stand corrected then, glad to hear it works out for you. I too stand corrected, I knew I should have been more specific about about which airline, knowing that American's reserve rules are better than other airlines. So...if you get hired by United forget about LC! How about that?:cool:

Sliceback
02-03-2018, 07:04 PM
I too stand corrected, I knew I should have been more specific about about which airline, knowing that American's reserve rules are better than other airlines. So...if you get hired by United forget about LC! How about that?:cool:

LOL. Obviously you havnít read the constant complaints about the AA contract. ďThe worst evah!Ē ;-)

ViperGuy69
02-05-2018, 05:18 PM
Lots of great advice. Thanks for all the responses. All my buds who have retired say life is better on the outside, but they also say the first year is the worst, but itís worth it.

One last question: Iíve been offered an opportunity to apply for a job flying King Airís for a corporate outfit. Great pay and benefits and home a LOT more than airlines. Would flying Part 91/135 for a few years after retirement make me any more/less competitive for an airline job later?

rickair7777
02-05-2018, 05:37 PM
Lots of great advice. Thanks for all the responses. All my buds who have retired say life is better on the outside, but they also say the first year is the worst, but itís worth it.

One last question: Iíve been offered an opportunity to apply for a job flying King Airís for a corporate outfit. Great pay and benefits and home a LOT more than airlines. Would flying Part 91/135 for a few years after retirement make me any more/less competitive for an airline job later?

Unless you need it for currency, it would not be helpful. Probably wouldn't hurt you either, but if you're going to do airlines might as well get your seniority now while it's hot (unless you have some particular family circumstance).

Sliceback
02-05-2018, 07:09 PM
What do you value more? Every year flying a King Air is a year off the end of your airline career. A 44 yr old hired today would retire around #1575. Thatís 11% overall. About 5 yrs as a 777/787/330 CA in the junior bases. One to two yrs in the senior bases. Or you could stay as a n//b CA and retire around 14% in a senior base or 4% in a junior base.

The pay youíd forgo would be around $350,00 per year. So the King Air job would Ďcostí you about $200-250K per year.

Otterbox
02-05-2018, 09:01 PM
Lots of great advice. Thanks for all the responses. All my buds who have retired say life is better on the outside, but they also say the first year is the worst, but itís worth it.

One last question: Iíve been offered an opportunity to apply for a job flying King Airís for a corporate outfit. Great pay and benefits and home a LOT more than airlines. Would flying Part 91/135 for a few years after retirement make me any more/less competitive for an airline job later?

The allure of great pay for a transition job vs taking the harder path and going to a regional is always tough to overcome for folks transitioning.

I generally advise folks to go 121 right off the bat to beef up their resume and to only consider taking a King Air job if theyíve got a resume that makes them otherwise a shoe in for getting a call and are only lacking currency.

Unfortunately in your case it seems that even being flight current and a military fighter guy your resume isnít getting bites for whatever reason. If there are no undisclosed blemishes it could be that your apps havenít been in long enough, youíre too far out from your availability date to be of interest yet, or your target airline criteria is very narrow. Either way at this point it looks like youíre going to have to take a job that is viewed as a positive on your application, not just something that is neutral, or not a negative.

Transitioning from the military at your stage of the game youíre going from the top of the food chain to a place where your rank doesnít matter no one is really going to care any more or less about you or treat you any differently than the mid 20ís 5 year regional FO with 0TPIC sitting next to you in class. Whether you make the transition immediately or wait a few years to do it, the first year is still going to be the worst, but every month you wait to get to a tier one major costs you $25k+ a month in final earnings.

Sliceback
02-06-2018, 03:58 AM
What do you value more? Every year flying a King Air is a year off the end of your airline career. A 44 yr old hired today would retire around #1575. Thatís 11% overall. About 5 yrs as a 777/787/330 CA in the junior bases. One to two yrs in the senior bases. Or you could stay as a n//b CA and retire around 14% in a senior base or 4% in a junior base.

The pay youíd forgo would be around $350,00 per year. So the King Air job would Ďcostí you about $200-250K per year.

AA projections.

ViperGuy69
02-06-2018, 03:41 PM
More good advice, thanks.

I got my apps in to the ďbig 6Ē back in November. I plan to retire in July. Iím currently flying and Iíll finish with about 2500TT/2000TPIC all fighter/trainer. So hopefully itís just a matter of time before I start getting calls.

I would only consider the King Air job for QOL reasons (teenagers at home and in-laws with health issues nearby). I know it would cost me a few years of seniority and pay in the long run though.

Iím leaning towards AA because Iím close enough to DFW that I could sit LC at home and still be within driving distance.

Sliceback
02-06-2018, 04:40 PM
It seems like AA might be the best bet for you.

SW, with itís Dallas base, is worth evaluating.

Remember we donít pick the airline, they pick us.

Good luck.



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