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View Full Version : Interview gouge


Squallrider
02-15-2018, 05:38 AM
Hi everyone,

I apologize for a recurring thread but some updated info all in one place would be beneficial to everyone as LUV ramps up hiring.

Where is the most current gouge on the interview?
Iíve looked online at all the usual suspects but the material is for the most part a few years old. I realize thereís three parts but would like to know more of each part.

Which bases did the new hires get in the last class?
Trying for MDW hopefully asap.

Duration of training?
Iíve heard 2 months give or take. Any suggestions on how to handle the home life away from training center with kids.

Approximate income first year givin reserve times in a junior base. Is pay any different during the two months of training or is it just guaranteed hours at first year


Dukeuno
02-15-2018, 02:49 PM
Hi everyone,

I apologize for a recurring thread but some updated info all in one place would be beneficial to everyone as LUV ramps up hiring.

Where is the most current gouge on the interview?
Iíve looked online at all the usual suspects but the material is for the most part a few years old. I realize thereís three parts but would like to know more of each part.

[/B]
It cost 20 dollars but well worth it. Has all the gouge on it:

AVIATIONINTERVIEWS.COM

Proximity
02-15-2018, 03:02 PM
Pay during training is guarantee. 89/87/85 TFP depending on how many days in the month.

You should be able to hold MDW in 1-3 months. Some bids a couple new hires get MDW, although in the last bid there were no new hires. MDW is typically the most junior base after OAK and BWI.


saab2000
02-15-2018, 05:24 PM
I started my newhire class on February 7, 2017 and started IOE in MDW on April 5. I spent 55 nights at the hotel in DAL and had a couple breaks where I could have gone home. As it turned out, I went home to MSP once, when the others had their type rating oral exams. I had my type rating so it didn't apply to me.

There were one or two other opportunities for a night or two at home but not for long. Training is not intense or worrisome, but it is a bit compressed and they cover a lot of information, both company and training related. I very much enjoyed my training time and I think most of the others did too. But it was my fourth airline training program so there were very few surprises, except for how much the company seemed to want us and how much they wanted us all to succeed, something I had never experienced to the same degree in the past, though I never had a bad experience either. Southwest was the best of them all.

Plan on two months of pretty compressed training, especially if you don't have the type rating. But it's totally realistic and manageable even if you are new to the 737 and/or Part 121 flying.

Redchevron
02-15-2018, 07:14 PM
Pay during training is guarantee. 89/87/85 TFP depending on how many days in the month.

You should be able to hold MDW in 1-3 months. Some bids a couple new hires get MDW, although in the last bid there were no new hires. MDW is typically the most junior base after OAK and BWI.

How much is a TFP for new hires?

Warhawg01
02-15-2018, 08:14 PM
Same as first year pay. $67

Dukeuno
02-15-2018, 08:18 PM
Same as first year pay. $67

I think first year is 69.34 now. :)

Skyward
02-15-2018, 09:27 PM
Youíll gross $6000-$6600 / mo on training pay. 401k contribution on the first check. Insurance and bennies on the first day. Training hotel is normally the Hilton Anatole and very nice. I went home about once every 10days or so on average.

at6d
02-16-2018, 01:27 AM
I started my newhire class on February 7, 2017 and started IOE in MDW on April 5. I spent 55 nights at the hotel in DAL and had a couple breaks where I could have gone home. As it turned out, I went home to MSP once, when the others had their type rating oral exams. I had my type rating so it didn't apply to me.

There were one or two other opportunities for a night or two at home but not for long. Training is not intense or worrisome, but it is a bit compressed and they cover a lot of information, both company and training related. I very much enjoyed my training time and I think most of the others did too. But it was my fourth airline training program so there were very few surprises, except for how much the company seemed to want us and how much they wanted us all to succeed, something I had never experienced to the same degree in the past, though I never had a bad experience either. Southwest was the best of them all.

Plan on two months of pretty compressed training, especially if you don't have the type rating. But it's totally realistic and manageable even if you are new to the 737 and/or Part 121 flying.

Off probation 🍺🍺

Squallrider
02-16-2018, 03:48 AM
I think first year is 69.34 now. :)

APC shows $79 a hour or am missing something?TFP is how many hours you get paid a month right?

Squallrider
02-16-2018, 04:08 AM
Youíll gross $6000-$6600 / mo on training pay. 401k contribution on the first check. Insurance and bennies on the first day. Training hotel is normally the Hilton Anatole and very nice. I went home about once every 10days or so on average.

What about flight benefits? How does that work at LUV? Wife and kids I assume?

Peacock
02-16-2018, 04:16 AM
APC shows $79 a hour or am missing something?TFP is how many hours you get paid a month right?

TFP is complicated but is basically based on distance flown, not hours. APC has their approximate conversion to hourly pay.

You get flight benefits for parents, spouse, and kids. If single, you get one ďcompanionĒ each year that gets twelve round trips.

saab2000
02-16-2018, 05:37 AM
Off probation 🍺🍺

Indeed. Looking forward to the financial benefits as well as no longer turning in those captain reports. March will be a much more full-sized than the past year. That's gonna be nice to see!

The first year hasn't been bad but after a couple soft years (including a financially soft year at Sun Country) it's going to be nice to actually get back to what I was earning as an RJ captain and actually exceed those levels.

Very happy SWA offered me an interview and am humbled that they offered to take me on after I thought my expiration date had come and gone!

moflyer
02-16-2018, 11:13 AM
What about flight benefits? How does that work at LUV? Wife and kids I assume?

Travel kicks in almost right away, you bring documentation on day one. It takes six months to buy ZEDís. Travel is free for you and your family. You are also allowed to list two parents.

Squallrider
02-16-2018, 02:28 PM
Are people happy with their healthcare?

What about moving from a typical 401k at a regional to Southwest fund, any ideas how that works?

Thanks for all the info guys, considering when I spoke to a recruiter they said the estimates keep increasing for hiring this year almost on the monthly I think a lot of people will find this thread helpful

at6d
02-16-2018, 05:32 PM
Healthcare is fine. Many options including Regular Plan (zero premium).

Roll the 401k over like any job transfer. They will hook you up with forms.

Squallrider
02-17-2018, 08:31 AM
Whatís the reserve call out time? 2 hours?

Is there reserve proffering?

at6d
02-17-2018, 01:47 PM
2 hours

No

dash8driver
02-17-2018, 02:51 PM
Like at6d said, regular plan is pretty awesome. $0 monthly premiums but you pay out of pocket until you hit an individual/family deductible of $200/$300. After that you pay 20% up to a maximum yearly out of pocket of $2500. Only downside is preventative care is not covered.

Plan on roughly $4000/month after taxes while in training.

My class got mostly PHX LAS and OAK. MDW should be doable in 2 months.

Also, after IOE they will build you a line to bring you up to guarantee for the rest of the month. The month after you will be given a line to complete your consolidation (100 hours).

RJSAviator76
02-17-2018, 07:02 PM
One thing I’ll add about the Regular Plan, they’ll try to scare you out of it by saying things like ‘colonoscopy or mammograms aren’t usually covered” which is complete BS. As long as your doc can code it as diagnostic as opposed to preventative, it’ll be covered under the Regular Plan.

The plan has been absolutely fantastic and it literally costs us nothing in premiums, and over time, the savings add up enough to cover just about any preventative stuff you may want to do.

rightseat
02-17-2018, 07:58 PM
It cost 20 dollars but well worth it. Has all the gouge on it:

AVIATIONINTERVIEWS.COM

I totally and completely concur about aviationinterviews.com. It is the best site to get a really good understanding of what is going to happen on your Interview Day. However, please note that it is a subscription at $19.99 per month. With all the craziness of getting hired, getting to class, IOE, etc. I did not notice and paid for several months. Even at that - it was well worth the money!! You should post your experience and then cancel your subscription.

Squallrider
02-18-2018, 04:15 AM
I totally and completely concur about aviationinterviews.com. It is the best site to get a really good understanding of what is going to happen on your Interview Day. However, please note that it is a subscription at $19.99 per month. With all the craziness of getting hired, getting to class, IOE, etc. I did not notice and paid for several months. Even at that - it was well worth the money!! You should post your experience and then cancel your subscription.

Yes I subscribed and def notes the recurring payment. Donít interview for another month but trying to get the info lined up.
I see a lot of suggestions for not doing a interview prep, I am leaning toward doing the gouge having my TMAAT stories thought of but I donít want to come in with canned answers. Anyone else think thatís the correct way to do it? Southwest is top of my list so I donít mind spending money if itíll give me a edge

2strokin
02-18-2018, 08:25 AM
Yes I subscribed and def notes the recurring payment. Don’t interview for another month but trying to get the info lined up.
I see a lot of suggestions for not doing a interview prep, I am leaning toward doing the gouge having my TMAAT stories thought of but I don’t want to come in with canned answers. Anyone else think that’s the correct way to do it? Southwest is top of my list so I don’t mind spending money if it’ll give me a edge

Just my .02:

I wouldn't spend the money on the prep. Read through the gouge, look through your logbook to refresh yourself on some TMAAT questions, and just be yourself.

Have your logbooks up to date and in order. Tab the info they requested. Have a breakdown of your times for months 0-12, 12-24, 24-36, etc, up to 5 years.

After the 7 min drill, do a good debrief. Positive, negatives, and what you would have done different given more time.

Walking out of the interview, I really felt like they just wanted to know the real you.

Did I feel 100% sure that I got the job? No. Did I get hired? Yes.

EngineOut
02-18-2018, 01:47 PM
Yes I subscribed and def notes the recurring payment. Donít interview for another month but trying to get the info lined up.
I see a lot of suggestions for not doing a interview prep, I am leaning toward doing the gouge having my TMAAT stories thought of but I donít want to come in with canned answers. Anyone else think thatís the correct way to do it? Southwest is top of my list so I donít mind spending money if itíll give me a edge

I coupled aviationinterviews with insight from some friends who had recently interviewed. I was hired FWIW. I probably would have been more comfortable with prep, as everyone else had done it. It's not a guarantee, though. Most in my interview group had prepped and only 50% of us were hired.

Squallrider
02-18-2018, 06:17 PM
I coupled aviationinterviews with insight from some friends who had recently interviewed. I was hired FWIW. I probably would have been more comfortable with prep, as everyone else had done it. It's not a guarantee, though. Most in my interview group had prepped and only 50% of us were hired.

Iíve heard 50-75% get the job, I guess it just depends on the candidates more than how many they need to hire

flensr
02-18-2018, 07:21 PM
The guys I know who used a prep service appeared confident and afterwards seemed somewhat relieved by being "over-prepped". At least two guys who I think didn't use a prep service looked like they were going to barf the whole time from stress, even though their backgrounds were at least as good as anyone else's. A couple started off cool and collected, and seemed to get anxious as the day progressed.

At an interview I did some time ago, one candidate showed up with a logbook summary instead of a full logbook. Instant self-induced interview failure that probably would have been caught by a prep service. What's avoiding a 6-12 month re-attempt wait worth to you?

Some people get one shot at this, and some people just aren't naturally good about talking about themselves. Arriving relaxed and confident that you've done all you can do seems to be a good approach for a lot of people. Some people show up cold, and just naturally knock it out of the park. I don't think too many people can do that.

saab2000
02-19-2018, 05:02 AM
I paid for prep and it was absolutely worth it for me. But I hadn't really done an interview for a big company in well over a decade. My interview at Sun Country was a much more casual affair and not one on which to base the experience with a major airline. No negatives towards Sun Country, but they're different and much smaller.

Anyway, the prep I did was not cheap but was 100% worth it because they helped me formulate my thoughts into a more concise presentation. It gave me much more confidence that I was ready and they really double checked all the paperwork. I felt that I was as ready as it was possible to be when I walked in that morning. And I had the best interview I've ever had, in large part because the preparation put me at ease.

This was my experience and everyone has to do their own thing. I know many people get hired with no preparation from a paid service. It really depends on the individual. If I were going to interview at another major carrier (I'm not) I would definitely pay for prep from somebody who knows the process of that particular carrier.

Squallrider
02-19-2018, 05:11 AM
I paid for prep and it was absolutely worth it for me. But I hadn't really done an interview for a big company in well over a decade. My interview at Sun Country was a much more casual affair and not one on which to base the experience with a major airline. No negatives towards Sun Country, but they're different and much smaller.

Anyway, the prep I did was not cheap but was 100% worth it because they helped me formulate my thoughts into a more concise presentation. It gave me much more confidence that I was ready and they really double checked all the paperwork. I felt that I was as ready as it was possible to be when I walked in that morning. And I had the best interview I've ever had, in large part because the preparation put me at ease.

This was my experience and everyone has to do their own thing. I know many people get hired with no preparation from a paid service. It really depends on the individual. If I were going to interview at another major carrier (I'm not) I would definitely pay for prep from somebody who knows the process of that particular carrier.

Thanks for the response, who did you use? (Can PM). Iíve been on the recruiting team for two years so I have some experience in what to say, obviously not same as SWA. Just donít want to come across as canned answers, I have some TMAAT thoughts but Iíd be willing to pay for a good service and a check of paperwork /logbook summaries.

RJSAviator76
02-19-2018, 05:38 AM
It really depends on how one uses a prep. Don't use canned answers. Use the examples from your previous jobs to support what you're telling them about yourself.

The interview itself is a nonevent. It's a very low threat environment, and aside from LOI exercise, there's nothing remotely stressful about it. But there's a lot riding on it, try a multi-million dollar career. Rocky makes it a point to say they can hire each and every interviewee that day or they can not hire anyone that day. It's really down to an individual - no quotas. So, if you received the invite, the job is yours to lose.

TheBlueBaron
02-19-2018, 06:06 AM
I only used Aviationinterviews.com. I also talked to several buddies that had interviewed in the last year to get the full scoop. None of them suggested to use the paid prep services. IMO, using just these resources should give you all the information you need unless you are just extremely nervous. Then the paid prep may give you tips on staying calm during the interview.

I hadn't interviewed anywhere in over 17 years and I got the job. I got the impression during the interview that they know you can fly and can be trained, but really want to find out if they would like sitting next to you in the cockpit on a 4 day trip. The key, again just my opinion, is that you must turn on the charm, and prove to them that SWA is the ONLY place you want to fly at for the rest of your career. You must also be a lady or gentlemen using you absolute best manners. That means standing to shake hands, standing until the interviewer(s) is seated first, looking them in the eye, etc...

Also, the person that did my logbook review said that he can tell in the first 5 minutes if the interviewee really wants to be there or not.

Hope this helps somebody.

emersonbiguns
02-19-2018, 10:10 AM
Hope this helps somebody.

Yup, at least one... Thanks.

TheBlueBaron
02-20-2018, 04:30 PM
Yup, at least one... Thanks.

Happy to help:)

Squallrider
03-02-2018, 05:12 AM
A lot of people recently interviewed... what were some things you did right or wrong? What would you have done differently. Any paperwork issues you could have caught earlier?

slimothy
03-02-2018, 07:18 AM
A lot of people recently interviewed... what were some things you did right or wrong? What would you have done differently. Any paperwork issues you could have caught earlier?

Have you 12 month totals broken down for each of the previous 3 years and a 5 year total. Also your Instructor time and IFR time all calculated ahead of time. If you donít have to touch the provided calculator the logbook review will go smoothly and youíll have time left to BS with the interviewer.

Donít let the clock drop from your scan during the LOI.

Squallrider
03-02-2018, 10:05 AM
Have you 12 month totals broken down for each of the previous 3 years and a 5 year total. Also your Instructor time and IFR time all calculated ahead of time. If you donít have to touch the provided calculator the logbook review will go smoothly and youíll have time left to BS with the interviewer.

Donít let the clock drop from your scan during the LOI.

Interesting about the instrument, I havenít really logged much of it in 7 years at regional. Anyone get else get asked about that?

slimothy
03-02-2018, 10:39 AM
Interesting about the instrument, I havenít really logged much of it in 7 years at regional. Anyone get else get asked about that?

Youíve logged a lot of IFR, maybe not IMC, but 121 is all IFR.

flensr
03-02-2018, 10:11 PM
I got a template showing the logbook milestones that should be tabbed in the logbook, and summarized on a sheet listing those milestones. Pretty much everything the job requirements lists (1500 hours, so much turbine, pic, etc etc) should be identified ahead of time, tabbed in the logbook, and listed on a summary page.

At my logbook interview with SWA, the logbook guy asked me questions for almost all of those dates. I didn't have to dig thru my logbook because I had every single one on my summary sheet. We never even really opened up the logbooks, just transcribed them from my summary onto the interviewers note page because they were already all listed out. He just had to verify that I could give him the info and that my answers matched what he'd seen in my logbooks. Easy, if you show up prepared. That alone was worth the price of my interview prep, showing up with a great logbook summary sheet so we could swap war stories for half an hour instead of digging through my logbooks trying to find out when exactly I had 1500 turbine hours or whatever.

Making a personal connection with the interview team is easier if you've got your paperwork together and don't feel pressured to prove that you meet the minimum qualifications.

EngineOut
03-03-2018, 09:22 AM
Interesting about the instrument, I havenít really logged much of it in 7 years at regional. Anyone get else get asked about that?

I had about 275 hours "logged" out of 10000 hours. Not one peep about it from anyone.

Squallrider
03-03-2018, 10:05 AM
I had about 275 hours "logged" out of 10000 hours. Not one peep about it from anyone.

Iím guessing itís more for low time guys from military etc to make sure they meet atp mins if they donít have it already. I mean 7 years at a regional for me so I have any hours you want....except....inverted

FOG95
03-03-2018, 06:35 PM
Iím guessing itís more for low time guys from military etc to make sure they meet atp mins if they donít have it already. I mean 7 years at a regional for me so I have any hours you want....except....inverted

What slimothy said above regarding milestones on a logbook coversheet. Makes the logbook review a non-event. Regarding military and IFR; for any mil guys out there reading this and wondering, youíre fine, as youíve been an IFR certified pilot since the day you graduated pilot training. If youíve been logging IMC properly over the years then that wonít be an issue either. Best of luck.

WhaleSurfing
03-03-2018, 10:27 PM
I think the company prefers that you donít have an interview prep. They want to know the real you. They used to specifically ask if youíve done a prep and they can spot canned answers a mile away.

saab2000
03-04-2018, 02:46 AM
I think the company prefers that you don’t have an interview prep. They want to know the real you. They used to specifically ask if you’ve done a prep and they can spot canned answers a mile away.

I used paid interview prep and they didn't give me canned answers. They helped me polish the answers I already had and in the end, really very few of the questions we prepared ended up being asked anyway.

They helped give me confidence that I was going in as ready as possible. We went over all the paperwork and they gave assistance with the organization of that. They did a mock logbook review but mostly they helped rehearse the LOI and that's where I think it really paid off.

For me it was money well spent because I got the job and it was very helpful as I hadn't been through a serious interview in a long, long time. We all get stale over time and the interview prep help knock off the rust.

A good interview prep will not give us canned answers. They will help bring out a better version of ourselves.

Dukeuno
03-04-2018, 06:42 AM
[QUOTE=saab2000;2542516
A good interview prep will not give us canned answers. They will help bring out a better version of ourselves.[/QUOTE]

This right here^^^! A Prep is not for everyone, but a good Prep Comapny will do this and not provide canned answers.

slimothy
03-04-2018, 05:01 PM
I think the company prefers that you donít have an interview prep. They want to know the real you. They used to specifically ask if youíve done a prep and they can spot canned answers a mile away.

They asked me if I used it in my Feb interview, which I did, and told them. The trick is to use the prep to help shape your answers in a way that best demonstrates who you are. After 20 years in the Marine Corps, I had never heard of TMAAT question, and without prep, would not have had stories ready. Granted, SWA does not rely quite as heavily on TMAAT as other airlines, but you get my point.

flensr
03-04-2018, 08:28 PM
I used a prep service but they didn't ask me. In spite of the stress of an interview, I actually kind of had a good time during the visit and that may have showed. From start to finish I treated it like a tour of a great company I wanted to join, and the interviews were scheduled times/places to chat about mutual interests.

Enough of me talking about me, what do YOU think about me?

Not really, but the interview prep helped me relax by helping me identify what I could talk about that would let me show my experience and personality without it degenerating into me trying to brag on myself. Woven into almost every story was a lesson that kind of fit into how SWA works. The interview prep didn't give me canned responses, but it helped me better show how my experiences have prepared me to work at a company like SWA.

Plus, there are other more subtle parts of interviewing that the prep team helped me with. Like reminders of how and when to build rapport with the individuals you will meet during the process. That kind of thing turns the interview from a mechanical Q&A to a discussion between junior and senior colleagues, letting you get across the exact same information but in a much more natural and relaxed way.

Could I have done that without the prep? I certainly would have tried, but the prep was great practice and pointed out a few areas where I wasn't quite going about it in the best way or where I was skipping opportunities to turn an interview into a discussion. I didn't give the interviewers a single story or answer I got from the prep, but the prep helped me get my story out there in a comfortable way.

Swingline78
03-04-2018, 11:40 PM
LOI prep was helpful for me. The way I looked at it was you are competing with people who have had it. So at least even the odds before you start.

Squallrider
03-05-2018, 06:33 AM
In the LOI, did you have a jumpseater and if so what did they have access to? Acars/ Atlanta radio etc?

at6d
03-05-2018, 08:34 AM
You have an FO and jumpseater (who also plays FAs, dispatch, etc).

They have all the resources we would have on the line unless the scenario calls for something else.

BigWillyCapt
03-05-2018, 11:54 AM
Anybody at the Doubletree tonight and interviewing tomorrow?

BlueSideUp85
03-05-2018, 12:28 PM
Anybody at the Doubletree tonight and interviewing tomorrow?

I wish! Hahaha

Squallrider
03-05-2018, 12:35 PM
Anybody at the Doubletree tonight and interviewing tomorrow?

No but did what rate did you get? I have to get a room on the 19th

Charlie Waffles
03-05-2018, 12:45 PM
The Doubletree is sold out the night I need, so whats the next best options.

Thanks
Mike

flensr
03-05-2018, 01:06 PM
I went with the nearby motel 6 across the street from the strip club. I have earplugs and a loud alarm clock so it worked out for me. Of course that means uber/lyft to/from the interview and airport, or a rental car. I had other reasons to get a rental car, and the whole package rental plus motel added up to about what the more expensive hotels would have cost.

Twinjetav8r
03-05-2018, 01:28 PM
In the LOI, did you have a jumpseater and if so what did they have access to? Acars/ Atlanta radio etc?



Yes on the jumpseater. He acts as F/A, Dispatch, Medlink and anybody else you need. They told me in the beginning that they have the best radios in the world. Voice activated. I would just say ďdispatchĒ and he said go ahead. Then when I wanted to talk to the F/A, I would say, hey F/A...


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

BigWillyCapt
03-05-2018, 01:40 PM
I paid pretty much full price I think. $209 was what I was quoted. They have a SW rate which was significantly cheaper but after some back-and-forth she did say it was for SW employees so I figured I wouldn't make any assumptions that I might regret.

ZapBrannigan
03-05-2018, 02:42 PM
I went with the nearby motel 6 across the street from the strip club. I have earplugs and a loud alarm clock so it worked out for me. Of course that means uber/lyft to/from the interview and airport, or a rental car. I had other reasons to get a rental car, and the whole package rental plus motel added up to about what the more expensive hotels would have cost.



Dude... [emoji85][emoji86][emoji87]


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Aviatormar
03-05-2018, 07:43 PM
I used a prep service but they didn't ask me. In spite of the stress of an interview, I actually kind of had a good time during the visit and that may have showed. From start to finish I treated it like a tour of a great company I wanted to join, and the interviews were scheduled times/places to chat about

Enough of me talking about me, what do YOU think about me?

Not really, but the interview prep helped me relax by helping me identify what I could talk about that would let me show my experience and personality without it degenerating into me trying to brag on myself. Woven into almost every story was a lesson that kind of fit into how SWA works. The interview prep didn't give me canned responses, but it helped me better show how my experiences have prepared me to work at a company like SWA.

Plus, there are other more subtle parts of interviewing that the prep team helped me with. Like reminders of how and when to build rapport with the individuals you will meet during the process. That kind of thing turns the interview from a mechanical Q&A to a discussion between junior and senior colleagues, letting you get across the exact same information but in a much more natural and relaxed way.

Could I have done that without the prep? I certainly would have tried, but the prep was great practice and pointed out a few areas where I wasn't quite going about it in the best way or where I was skipping opportunities to turn an interview into a discussion. I didn't give the interviewers a single story or answer I got from the prep, but the prep helped me get my story out there in a comfortable way.


Sounds like a great service- may I ask what company did you use for prep?

flensr
03-05-2018, 09:47 PM
Sounds like a great service- may I ask what company did you use for prep?

Rebekah Krone, www.careertakeoff.com. I hope I'm not breaking forum rules posting this. If it gets deleted, PM me and I'll send it to you directly. If I get banned, find her on facebook :)

flensr
03-05-2018, 10:14 PM
Dude... [emoji85][emoji86][emoji87]


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Is it bad that the guy at the front desk gave me the master key and a list of 6 rooms, and said go find the best one then come back for my own key? I thought at the time it was a better solution than sending me off to just one room at a time, hoping I wouldn't come back for one reason or another. It worked out, the room I got didn't stink, the AC and heater worked, bed and towels were clean, nobody stole my cheap rental hoopty, etc.

Plus, earplugs. In Iraq, I had a room a mile from a heavy weapon training range for about 7 months. So yea, earplugs. Those nice soft squishy orange max protection ones.

ZapBrannigan
03-06-2018, 09:01 AM
I will never understand the whole ďIím former military so anything is better than a tent and an MRE.Ē Youíre not in the military anymore and your are deserving of a comfortable place to sleep as a professional business traveler.

(Not necessarily directed at you. But hope you will remember it when you get hired and we are negotiating for hotel language.Ē


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

flensr
03-06-2018, 09:24 AM
I will never understand the whole ďIím former military so anything is better than a tent and an MRE.Ē Youíre not in the military anymore and your are deserving of a comfortable place to sleep as a professional business traveler.

(Not necessarily directed at you. But hope you will remember it when you get hired and we are negotiating for hotel language.Ē


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Oh, don't worry. When it's on the company dime I'm on board with pretty much the same stuff everyone else wants :) In this case, I had to stay within a budget to make sure I could pay rent. First year pay pretty much zeroed out my savings so if it's out of my pocket, it's gonna be the budget choice for another year or two. If I show up on time, rested, and in a freshly ironed/cleaned suit, the interviewer doesn't need to know where I stayed.

Squallrider
03-07-2018, 06:08 AM
Howíd the interview go?

Aviatormar
03-07-2018, 06:38 AM
Rebekah Krone, www.careertakeoff.com. I hope I'm not breaking forum rules posting this. If it gets deleted, PM me and I'll send it to you directly. If I get banned, find her on facebook :)


Thanks for the heads up! Sounds great!

Squallrider
03-18-2018, 11:05 AM
Anyone else interviewing Tuesday???

airresq
05-08-2018, 07:21 AM
Can someone please post some different LOI scenarios? This would be very helpful to me and Iím sure some other folks as well.

Smooth at FL450
05-08-2018, 09:08 AM
Can someone please post some different LOI scenarios? This would be very helpful to me and Iím sure some other folks as well.

The scenario you get doesn't matter. There is no right or wrong answer to chose. It's how you gather/process information and make your decision that matters.

slimothy
05-08-2018, 09:46 AM
The scenario you get doesn't matter. There is no right or wrong answer to chose. It's how you gather/process information and make your decision that matters.

Concur. Itís all about methodology, communication, prioritization and humility, both in considering the crewís input and especially during the debrief.

That being said, I interviewed twice before getting hired, my scenarios were FA reporting hot air pouring out of the overhead in the aft galley, and the second one was fumes in the cabin. Both times I failed to keep an eye on the clock and ended up spitting out a 2 second brief. I dinged myself for it during the debrief both times.

The biggest mistake I made the first time around was making a decision, briefing it, then changing my mind because I was going to land way over weight (which would not have mattered, at all). I debriefed how I felt like I made a mistake in doing that, and that I should have stuck with the first decision. I doubt that the LOI was the reason I didnít get hired. It is the quickest 7 minutes of your life!

Best of luck, hope this helps.

airresq
05-08-2018, 01:31 PM
Thanks for the input. I'm just looking for any insight into the process.

Smooth at FL450
05-08-2018, 03:19 PM
Thanks for the input. I'm just looking for any insight into the process.

It's a 7 minute drill to assess your ability to work with a crew to assess a problem, come up with a solution, and finally to debrief and self-critique.

Twinjetav8r
05-08-2018, 04:47 PM
It's a 7 minute drill to assess your ability to work with a crew to assess a problem, come up with a solution, and finally to debrief and self-critique.



This! They donít really care what you decision is, just how you get there, how you stick with it and how you use your resources. My guy said ďI donít agree with your decision and want to go on record saying soĒ. They are evaluating what you will do. I said, I appreciate your input and concern, but this is why I am choosing what I am choosing (slowly looking at the clock with 50 seconds left) and could you please brief the cabin and do the descent checklist. He said, ok, the LOI is finished. I said to myself, well, I blew it! He looked over at me and said ďI didnít say I was going to agree with you..and winkedĒ.

The debrief is just as important. Make three columns. 1. Things I thought ďweĒ did well. 2. Things I thought we could have done better. 3. And things we would have done if We had more time.

I got hired.


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at6d
05-08-2018, 07:57 PM
In my humble opinion, actually making a decision in the allotted time and the debrief is the key. There are a zillion ways to decide an event, but a safe and CRM involved decision is the goal.

EngineOut
05-08-2018, 08:59 PM
This! They don’t really care what you decision is, just how you get there, how you stick with it and how you use your resources. My guy said “I don’t agree with your decision and want to go on record saying so”. They are evaluating what you will do. I said, I appreciate your input and concern, but this is why I am choosing what I am choosing (slowly looking at the clock with 50 seconds left) and could you please brief the cabin and do the descent checklist. He said, ok, the LOI is finished. I said to myself, well, I blew it! He looked over at me and said “I didn’t say I was going to agree with you..and winked”.

The debrief is just as important. Make three columns. 1. Things I thought “we” did well. 2. Things I thought we could have done better. 3. And things we would have done if We had more time.

I got hired.


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This is excellent and exactly correct. If you can do exactly this and not start stressing out and getting pi$$y with your "crew", you will have a job at SWA.

airresq
05-09-2018, 06:29 AM
This! They donít really care what you decision is, just how you get there, how you stick with it and how you use your resources. My guy said ďI donít agree with your decision and want to go on record saying soĒ. They are evaluating what you will do. I said, I appreciate your input and concern, but this is why I am choosing what I am choosing (slowly looking at the clock with 50 seconds left) and could you please brief the cabin and do the descent checklist. He said, ok, the LOI is finished. I said to myself, well, I blew it! He looked over at me and said ďI didnít say I was going to agree with you..and winkedĒ.

The debrief is just as important. Make three columns. 1. Things I thought ďweĒ did well. 2. Things I thought we could have done better. 3. And things we would have done if We had more time.

I got hired.


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Thanks. That was very helpful. Congratulations!

Uptair
05-10-2018, 05:22 AM
You will have a ďcheckairmanĒ in the jump but make sure to ask for the FOs input first! The FO is Second in Command not the Jumpseater. My FO suggested that we turn off the Galley power bc of an acrid smell scenario. Debrief, debrief, debrief!!!! I actually chair flew scenarios with a timer multiple times. It really helped. I got hired.

Psycho18th
05-11-2018, 04:26 PM
1. Make a decision in the allotted time with inputs from your crew using some sort of pre-planned process. 2. Donít become a flaming A-hole when under a small amount of fake pressure. 3. Be able to learn something from the induced flail and talk about that somewhat coherently in the debrief.

Seems to me, those are the main points of surviving the LOI intact. Practice a couple with a stopwatch beforehand. Especially helpful to have a couple pilot buddies watch you, pretend to be your FO and check airman jumpseater, and then comment afterwards on your obvious shortcomings as a human being.
Also 4. If youíre a former fighter guy, remember you now have passengers and FAís who will be interested to know they are landing in Louisville instead of Atlanta due to your abundance of caution and extreme care for their safety. Corollary: You canít just eject and laugh tauntingly during the parachute ride into the Swedish bikini team photo chute.

at6d
05-11-2018, 05:44 PM
Diversion checklist

n606tw
01-16-2019, 05:00 AM
Any latest update on the subject ... thanks!

Squallrider
01-17-2019, 06:50 AM
Any latest update on the subject ... thanks!

Be consistent in your why southwest answer, that will determine your success. They want people that want to be here and not someone that will leave if a faster upgrade place calls. Use knowledge of southwest to back up your answer, no furlough, business model that will endure economic downturns, highly rated employer of choice etc.

For your scenario think through things, have a reason for your decision and remember that your original destination may
Be a option if situation improves. Just be able to back up your answer / decision making process.

For your logbook review they will ask for some weird total that you probably donít have... for instance mine was duel given whilst a check airman...donít panic and be able to show your answer.

n606tw
01-17-2019, 10:43 AM
Be consistent in your why southwest answer, that will determine your success. They want people that want to be here and not someone that will leave if a faster upgrade place calls. Use knowledge of southwest to back up your answer, no furlough, business model that will endure economic downturns, highly rated employer of choice etc.

For your scenario think through things, have a reason for your decision and remember that your original destination may
Be a option if situation improves. Just be able to back up your answer / decision making process.

For your logbook review they will ask for some weird total that you probably donít have... for instance mine was duel given whilst a check airman...donít panic and be able to show your answer.

Thanks bud ... I guess you are already building High Performance Relationship! Lol

Squallrider
01-17-2019, 12:47 PM
Thanks bud ... I guess you are already building High Performance Relationship! Lol

Anytime. They really care about what makes you, everyone in my class had a somewhat different background, they werent just military for instance they were heavy/fighter/helo people, some with different roles in military too. Every single person you talk to will ask you why southwest even in informal settings :) good luck! Getting the interview is the hard part

Bizkit
02-02-2019, 09:19 AM
Interviewing soon and I'm not sure how I should present the paperwork. The instructions spell out what should be in each stack, but I don't just want to walk in there with loose papers in different piles.
Recommendations? Would anyone be so kind as to post a picture of what type of organizer they used?

Thanks for the help.

jetset
02-02-2019, 10:49 AM
Interviewing soon and I'm not sure how I should present the paperwork. The instructions spell out what should be in each stack, but I don't just want to walk in there with loose papers in different piles.
Recommendations? Would anyone be so kind as to post a picture of what type of organizer they used?

Thanks for the help.

https://thumbs2.ebaystatic.com/d/l225/m/moVzusTnpXQGwb-drb2dMYQ.jpg

- and -

https://www.umsltritonstore.com/images/product/large/67259.jpg

Nutz
02-02-2019, 10:52 AM
I brought them in folders and one of the first things they did the morning of the interview was collect them. They took my folders, removed the papers and handed me back the empty folders. Just bring them in something that will keep them from getting damaged and be ready to hand them over as papers only.

BigWillyCapt
02-04-2019, 10:18 AM
Interviewing soon and I'm not sure how I should present the paperwork. The instructions spell out what should be in each stack, but I don't just want to walk in there with loose papers in different piles.
Recommendations? Would anyone be so kind as to post a picture of what type of organizer they used?

Thanks for the help.


I bought a couple/(3?) red folders. Used a black sharpie to write stack 1/2 on the front and stuffed everything in them.

PowerShift
02-04-2019, 08:02 PM
I bought a couple/(3?) red folders. Used a black sharpie to write stack 1/2 on the front and stuffed everything in them.

Yup. Read the instructions, when youíre done, read them again. Then go through the instructions step by step as you prepare your material. I found mistakes/omissions after reading the instructions over.

They did not ask me for a single thing, it was all there. My logbooks were clean, noted with stickie notes where requested and easy to examine. The logbook guy did his paper work and checked some boxes (5 min) then we BSíd about flying for 20 minutes. You donít want to spend 30 min piecing your logbook times together so they make sense. Make that easy and apparent.

Things that happen behind the scenes
- A credit report will be run on you
- A beckground check will be run (Donít lie, even if itís not on the state/county record anymore, theses background companies do mass data pulls all the time, and save the info). WestLaw and PeopleMap are a few.

Way2Busy
02-08-2019, 03:43 PM
Yup. Read the instructions, when youíre done, read them again. Then go through the instructions step by step as you prepare your material. I found mistakes/omissions after reading the instructions over.

They did not ask me for a single thing, it was all there. My logbooks were clean, noted with stickie notes where requested and easy to examine. The logbook guy did his paper work and checked some boxes (5 min) then we BSíd about flying for 20 minutes. You donít want to spend 30 min piecing your logbook times together so they make sense. Make that easy and apparent.

Things that happen behind the scenes
- A credit report will be run on you
- A beckground check will be run (Donít lie, even if itís not on the state/county record anymore, theses background companies do mass data pulls all the time, and save the info). WestLaw and PeopleMap are a few.

Can you expand on what they are looking for on the logbook review?

Zard
02-08-2019, 04:56 PM
Can you expand on what they are looking for on the logbook review?


Shoot me a PM. Iím drinking right meow but thatíll remind me when I get back tomorrow.

French3Holer
02-08-2019, 05:43 PM
Can you expand on what they are looking for on the logbook review?

They are looking for all events (type ratings/atp/1000 tpic...)that they ask you tab in your logbooks. They also ask you for your time in the last 5 years. I broke it down by type/PIC-SIC every 12 months to include each type for 5 years (60 months).

The pilot conducting the logbook review will ask you all sorts of questions about how much time in the last 90 days, 6 months, 12 months, all the way to 5 years I think. HERE IS THE KEY. I built a table with all of the times broken down and put a southwest logo on it and pulled it out when he started asking about the times. He said, "Whatcha got there?" so I explained and so he said, "Hand it over" and he filled his form out off of my tables. He chuckled and joked about being super prepared.

The rest of the time was Why Southwest? Tell me about a time when you failed as a leader. More relaxed than the other two parts but you can still blow it on this portion.

hoover
02-08-2019, 06:09 PM
They are looking for all events (type ratings/atp/1000 tpic...)that they ask you tab in your logbooks. They also ask you for your time in the last 5 years. I broke it down by type/PIC-SIC every 12 months to include each type for 5 years (60 months).

The pilot conducting the logbook review will ask you all sorts of questions about how much time in the last 90 days, 6 months, 12 months, all the way to 5 years I think. HERE IS THE KEY. I built a table with all of the times broken down and put a southwest logo on it and pulled it out when he started asking about the times. He said, "Whatcha got there?" so I explained and so he said, "Hand it over" and he filled his form out off of my tables. He chuckled and joked about being super prepared.

The rest of the time was Why Southwest? Tell me about a time when you failed as a leader. More relaxed than the other two parts but you can still blow it on this portion.

I did the same thing then we spent the rest of the time talking about beer.
Knew I was at the right place

PowerShift
02-08-2019, 08:18 PM
They are looking for all events (type ratings/atp/1000 tpic...)that they ask you tab in your logbooks. They also ask you for your time in the last 5 years. I broke it down by type/PIC-SIC every 12 months to include each type for 5 years (60 months).

The pilot conducting the logbook review will ask you all sorts of questions about how much time in the last 90 days, 6 months, 12 months, all the way to 5 years I think. HERE IS THE KEY. I built a table with all of the times broken down and put a southwest logo on it and pulled it out when he started asking about the times. He said, "Whatcha got there?" so I explained and so he said, "Hand it over" and he filled his form out off of my tables. He chuckled and joked about being super prepared.

The rest of the time was Why Southwest? Tell me about a time when you failed as a leader. More relaxed than the other two parts but you can still blow it on this portion.

This.
I used excel to build a logbook table, then just added the respective years up in my logbook and put those totals in the respective rows for each year. Think of the bottom totals page of your logbook. Make one of those for each of the last five years, then add the five years up in the final row.

I went through my logbooks, and used a pink highlighter to highlight the lines for the events/times requested. Then put a sticky note on that page with the event/time, like a bookmark so one could just read the sticky note and turn to that page and easily see the highlighted entry.

They need to verify you have the required minimums they have set. That is what is going on. The interviewer has a sheet of paper with the requirements and checks a box for each one as they verify.

So, make this easy for them/you. They will give you time to explain and figure your times and find the events, but donít put yourself in that situation.

Interviews are more then just a verbal event. The totality of the interview is can you follow instructions, are you composed enough to prepare for the event.

at6d
02-08-2019, 10:10 PM
You donít have to use a highlighter, but for sure tab the important pages and print out your five-year lookback.

If your resume, credentials page, and logbook tell different stories, you may have a problem.

Warhawg01
02-08-2019, 10:27 PM
One thing to remember about the logbook interview. It is an *interview*. They have all your paperwork. They have the fancy excel summary spreadsheets that everyone does and turns in very close to the top of one of the requested stacks. They will ask you all these questions anyway. Know the answers, like hourly totals for each of the last five years.

One question I got I said I needed to look on my summary sheet. Had to pull it off the top of a very messy pile of all my stacks. Iím quite sure this pile was very messy on purpose. And not because he was reading any of it.

A note to former mil guys: ignore all this talk about tabbing your logbook. My interview instructions specifically said for USAF guys not to do it. So if the thought of dusting off your flight records folder and getting a calculator makes your head hurt, donít sweat it. As long as the instructions still say that...

Squallrider
02-09-2019, 04:03 AM
I would print a excel sheet for him/her and one for yourself too so you can reference it.

They will ask you a time you probably donít have on you (on purpose) I believe to see if you panic or what your process is. Mine for instance was dual given as a check airman.

Way2Busy
02-09-2019, 04:58 AM
Many thanks for the tips. I already have much of that set up in excel already. Tabbing the important events I hadn't thought of though. Seems fairly straightforward, until the wild card question comes. Thoughts on bringing a laptop to this? Or would that look bad?

French3Holer
02-09-2019, 06:53 AM
I would print a excel sheet for him/her and one for yourself too so you can reference it.

They will ask you a time you probably donít have on you (on purpose) I believe to see if you panic or what your process is. Mine for instance was dual given as a check airman.

They asked me this as well, actually. I told them I didn't denote it in my logbook but had all the logbook sheets from the aircraft when I acted as Check Airman. He said to guess so I did. He asked about the nature of my check airman activities which were line checks about 15% and the rest 135.299 orals.

TexasLegacy
02-09-2019, 07:13 AM
Is it an issue if we logged dual received and PIC at the same time? This makes the pilot credentials times different than my logbook totals, because I moved the dual received time to an SIC column. So this throws off the PIC/SIC totals on pilot credentials from logbook totals.

EngineOut
02-09-2019, 07:24 AM
Is it an issue if we logged dual received and PIC at the same time? This makes the pilot credentials times different than my logbook totals, because I moved the dual received time to an SIC column. So this throws off the PIC/SIC totals on pilot credentials from logbook totals.

I had the same issue and just noted it in on PC...was never asked about it and was never a concern.

flensr
02-09-2019, 07:26 AM
I got a couple of questions like show me where you reached 1500 turbine hours. I had tabbed that flight and my logbook had some remarks in it that helped me remember a couple of details about the flight, so I was able to flip to the correct page and actually talk about what kind of flying I was doing at the time.

SWA wants people who like flying, and remembering details about milestone flights can help show that.

TexasLegacy
02-09-2019, 07:50 AM
I had the same issue and just noted it in on PC...was never asked about it and was never a concern.

Did your resume times match your logbook, specifically your PIC/SIC, or did it match the pilot credentials times?

EngineOut
02-09-2019, 10:44 AM
Did your resume times match your logbook, specifically your PIC/SIC, or did it match the pilot credentials times?

Logbook. That is the official record. Pilot Credentials has a different way to account for the type of time for whatever reason, but dual received and PIC (when rated) is the proper way to log that time. Airline Apps has a similar issue.

SlipperyWing
02-09-2019, 02:06 PM
I never put my type ratings in my log book since they were all sim rides. I've got my training records from all my type rides, but not logged in chronological order with the rest of my actual flight time. (I've never been in the practice of logging sim time.)

The kicker is that I took my ATP ride along with a type ride in the simulator, so that "event" never got logged, either.

I would certainly provide the training records, but any suggestions for how to handle the fact that those events are not in chronological order in my paper logbook?

Would adding them to my digital logbook that I will print out suffice?

BigWillyCapt
02-09-2019, 03:06 PM
I never put my type ratings in my log book since they were all sim rides. I've got my training records from all my type rides, but not logged in chronological order with the rest of my actual flight time. (I've never been in the practice of logging sim time.)

The kicker is that I took my ATP ride along with a type ride in the simulator, so that "event" never got logged, either.

I would certainly provide the training records, but any suggestions for how to handle the fact that those events are not in chronological order in my paper logbook?

Would adding them to my digital logbook that I will print out suffice?


I took my ATP ride in an actual airplane so that wasn't an issue. However, like you, I didn't log much sim time during my regional 121 days. Lucky for me, at the end of each year, I skipped to the next page, leaving me some blank lines at the end of each year. I went back and added my PCs/LOEs etc at the end of each year. So not chronological exactly. Wasn't an issue. If you don't have the space to add it, doing the digital logbook might be a good option. Although I would want them to match as much as possible. There's nothing in the FAR's that says your flights/logged time has to be chronological. You could put a page at the end for SIM. or You could even get a separate logbook for your SIM time, but this might seem a little off the wall. I don't think they really care that much. Just, like others have said, that you have the minimum requirements and stuff doesn't look suspicious.

barabek
02-09-2019, 07:21 PM
You guys are going way too deep. Bring you documents they ask for, logbooks, and be ready to find the "milestones" in there. I never had an electronic logbook, so I brought 4 handwritten logbooks with bookmarked checkrides, 1000 TPIC (it was required back then), and few others (I can't remember exactly). I never logged sims or type rides, but marked first dates, or IOEs in each type I had, including upgrade OE. It was not even necessary but is a quick reference that confirms you resume. Nobody asked about 121 rides and I had no records, ATP certificate is the proof. Relax and don't panic if they ask a question you did not prepare the answer to. They wanna see if you know what's in your logbook. If it's really yours, you should have no problem finding the stuff. Good luck, it's not that hard!

SEAtoSummit
02-13-2019, 04:53 AM
What was the logbook review like for military guys? Do you need to bring the whole green HARM folder or just the single-page summary sheet on top of your own logbook (e- or paper)? Do you need to bring the FEF with all your checkride Form 8s? My e-logbook has all my milestones (check rides, A/C upgrade, IP cert, etc) entered in the remarks column - is that sufficient?

I'm probably overthinking this, but I'd hate to show up and be told "prove to me you upgraded to A/C on the C-17 on this date", and be caught without the right documentation.

Psycho18th
02-13-2019, 05:58 AM
I remember it being pretty clear what to put in the stacks if read carefully. I had the form from my FEF with all my checkrides. I had the flight time summary from my flight records. I made a spreadsheet with all the times they asked for specifically with the time conversions, just to make it easier to answer questions about how many hours in each of the last 3-5 years.

Zini
02-13-2019, 07:28 PM
I'm probably overthinking this, but I'd hate to show up and be told "prove to me you upgraded to A/C on the C-17 on this date", and be caught without the right documentation.

I cannot speak to the military aspect of the logbook review however I can almost certainly say that the questioning is not like this. For me, they just browsed my logbook, saw how I logged time, checked the required tabbed information etc. They more cross reference your resume (dates, places) with your flying records.

For me, it was ok you were hired by this airline on this date... They then thumbed to something around that date and saw logged time in CRJs, and then moved on. Its just an overall check that what you have submitted makes logical sense and is mostly accurate. Nothing really to sweat.

CaptYoda
02-14-2019, 02:30 AM
To echo what others have said. It was very laid back and more of a conversation about your life and background. Just tab all the events that they ask you for and the breakdown of hours they require over a time period. I think my logbook review was probably 15 minutes.

Redbird79
02-14-2019, 06:50 AM
Has anybody gone into the logbook interview with only their electronic logbook? If so, how did that go? I have 6 regular logbooks, but the electronic book is much more professional-looking IMO. Thanks!

Skyward
02-14-2019, 07:04 AM
Has anybody gone into the logbook interview with only their electronic logbook? If so, how did that go? I have 6 regular logbooks, but the electronic book is much more professional-looking IMO. Thanks!

I went in with all of my logbooks tabbed and labeled (Logbook #1, Logbook #2, etc.). I highligted and tabbed all the important accomplishments (first solo, Private Pilot checkride, type rides, etc.). I think being able to see those events in a historical progression helps them get to know you and your progress in aviation. An electronic logbook is very professional looking, but it makes you look more like a number instead of a person, IMO.

That being said, I also have an electronic logbook that matched my old-school paper logbooks. I took a printout of the summary from my electronic logbook and mentioned that I have the printed electronic logbook with me as well. They only looked at my paper logbooks and the breakdown of the info they asked for. It was very low stress and just a conversation about my flying experience and history. 10-15 minutes.

RJSAviator76
02-14-2019, 07:49 AM
I had all my regular logbooks and I had all of them in electronic log. Brought them all. I tabbed everything they asked for. I had 1 checkride failure and retake tabbed as well as ATP and every type ride, and also when I hit 1,000 TPIC.

Your logbook review portion is done by a line pilot. Make it easy on him/her. Have your annual totals going back 5 years.

We talked about my logbook maybe 5 mins and spent the rest shooting the breeze about Southwest and what to expect as a new hire. It was very laid back.

Like I said, make it easy on the interviewer - they are all line pilots here.

Squallrider
02-14-2019, 08:16 AM
Has anybody gone into the logbook interview with only their electronic logbook? If so, how did that go? I have 6 regular logbooks, but the electronic book is much more professional-looking IMO. Thanks!

I got my electronic log printer out and had my iPad with me to search anything heíd want. Itís not expensive and well worth it to have done professionally

EngineOut
02-14-2019, 09:41 AM
Has anybody gone into the logbook interview with only their electronic logbook? If so, how did that go? I have 6 regular logbooks, but the electronic book is much more professional-looking IMO. Thanks!

Had everything on an E-log printed and spiral bound at Office Depot/Max (whatever), brought originals with endorsements and whatnot, everything tabbed on both originals and E-log printout. Excel summary spreadsheet with lookbacks and milestones. Never looked at originals and log review took about 45 seconds...the rest was talking about flying and why Southwest.

Agreed with previous replies...make it as easy as possible on the interviewer to check their boxes and enjoy the rest of your time with the person you're speaking with.

Pro tip: put whatever summary sheet you have with the logbooks when the collect them. Otherwise, you may not have access to it during the actual logbook review interview.

CA1900
02-14-2019, 12:39 PM
I went in with a combination of my old paper logbooks, which I never converted to electronic (just too much data entry), along with one more logbook that was a bound printout of my LogTen Pro electronic logbook that I did at FedEx Office (which covered my flights since 2006). No issues at all at the interview, and most of our conversation was around that most recent logbook.

Redbird79
02-14-2019, 04:03 PM
Thanks for the help guys and gals!

ZapBrannigan
02-14-2019, 04:32 PM
I went in with a combination of my old paper logbooks, which I never converted to electronic (just too much data entry), along with one more logbook that was a bound printout of my LogTen Pro electronic logbook that I did at FedEx Office (which covered my flights since 2006). No issues at all at the interview, and most of our conversation was around that most recent logbook.


Slacker. Awww too much data entry. [emoji33]


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

CA1900
02-14-2019, 07:06 PM
Slacker. Awww too much data entry.

My laziness is how they verify I'm a real pilot. :D

:p

squatcher1
02-16-2019, 06:53 AM
Of the many pilots hired, how long did it take for you to be notified after your interview?

flyguy81
02-16-2019, 07:13 AM
Of the many pilots hired, how long did it take for you to be notified after your interview?

2-3 weeks depending on when your decision board meets.

saab2000
02-17-2019, 01:22 AM
Of the many pilots hired, how long did it take for you to be notified after your interview?

When I interviewed in December of 2016 they told us the date of the decision board meeting and the call came either that day or the next day. I no longer remember. But the decision will be made on the day they tell you and you'll have an answer shortly after that.

sMFer
02-17-2019, 10:11 AM
Of the many pilots hired, how long did it take for you to be notified after your interview?



You should have a pretty good idea of being hired once your refs are called.


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Sqwk7700
02-21-2019, 03:34 PM
You should have a pretty good idea of being hired once your refs are called.


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Maybe, but not always. I've known a couple people get all the refs called only to get the 'thanks but no thanks' email. The 'call' usually comes about two weeks later.

Squallrider
02-21-2019, 03:57 PM
You should have a pretty good idea of being hired once your refs are called.


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I had a guy that they called me about not get it...(I said all positive stuff about it, thatís why I recommended him) thought it wasnít the norm but possibility exists

sMFer
02-21-2019, 04:50 PM
Maybe, but not always. I've known a couple people get all the refs called only to get the 'thanks but no thanks' email. The 'call' usually comes about two weeks later.



As do I. But itís true the other way that if none called, you didnít make it past the interview.


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WhaleSurfing
02-24-2019, 12:33 PM
Maybe, but not always. I've known a couple people get all the refs called only to get the 'thanks but no thanks' email. The 'call' usually comes about two weeks later.

Thatís usually because thereís something in their background that disqualified them.

Fourpaw
02-26-2019, 06:18 AM
Anybody know what the average TT of new hires is? Is it still pretty high or is becoming 5500-6000 competitive?

flensr
02-26-2019, 11:57 AM
Anybody know what the average TT of new hires is? Is it still pretty high or is becoming 5500-6000 competitive?

You already know this, but I think any average is going to be meaningless since TT numbers are all over the place depending on what kind of experience you bring. There are guys with well over 10k hours who have never gotten an interview, and guys who barely make the mins who get hired. It would be intellectually interesting to see a scatter graph that shows all the TTs, maybe there would be some grouping that shows a particular sweet spot for any given demographic, but even there the spread is all over the place.

Bizkit
03-05-2019, 12:22 PM
This has been stated a few times, but I highly recommend Vicki Ross at Ace Interview Prep for any upcoming interviews. You can check out her bio on her website; sheíll prepare you well for Southwest. I also like that she charges by the hour based on what you think you need, which is definitely a plus if youíve already paid for another service in the past. Go to the Ace Interview Prep website and check it out.


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