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View Full Version : Are ALL TCAS RAs an incident?


2StgTurbine
03-02-2018, 05:58 PM
While it is clear that a TCAS RA that requires you to adjust your vertical speed (climb/descend) or deviate from an ATC clearance is an incident, what happens when you are in level flight and get a TCAS RA requiring you to maintain level flight?

Every time this has happened to me it was while we were in cruise and an aircraft below us was climbing at a high rate prior to leveling off 1,000 feet below us.

Any thoughts or official guidance?


CaptSwift
03-02-2018, 07:47 PM
Iíve heard.. that at least for the ERJ the FAA gets some of the RA data directly.. donít care to find if thatís true or not.

JamesNoBrakes
03-02-2018, 09:37 PM
Don't think there is any official guidance that classifies an RA as anything, but it would be in 8900 or order 8020.11, usually anything that generates a mandatory occurrence report by ATC gets sent to the FSDO/CMO for investigation from occurrence to accident (including incident). Minor situations are usually handled as occurrences, major situations usually incidents or higher. If the TCAS was caused by some part 91 pilot flying into the path of an airliner, the entire situation may be classified as an incident or NMAC, not necessarily the fault of the airliner, but obviously they'd be an involved party. If the RA causes you to violate an ATC clearance or instruction that triggers the ATC "alarm", it will generate an MOR. Usually you will know this based on your interaction with ATC, but they do not always issue the "brasher warning" either, so it's always advised to ASAP. Having to maneuver for an RA is a good reason to file an ASAP anyway, pilot deviation or not.


GogglesPisano
03-03-2018, 01:57 AM
Don't think there is any official guidance that classifies an RA as anything, but it would be in 8900 or order 8020.11, usually anything that generates a mandatory occurrence report by ATC gets sent to the FSDO/CMO for investigation from occurrence to accident (including incident). Minor situations are usually handled as occurrences, major situations usually incidents or higher. If the TCAS was caused by some part 91 pilot flying into the path of an airliner, the entire situation may be classified as an incident or NMAC, not necessarily the fault of the airliner, but obviously they'd be an involved party. If the RA causes you to violate an ATC clearance or instruction that triggers the ATC "alarm", it will generate an MOR. Usually you will know this based on your interaction with ATC, but they do not always issue the "brasher warning" either, so it's always advised to ASAP. Having to maneuver for an RA is a good reason to file an ASAP anyway, pilot deviation or not.

This.

An RA requires an ASAP at my carrier. Itís certainly not an NTSB ďincident.Ē So it depends on who is doing the defining.

rickair7777
03-03-2018, 07:44 AM
It's pretty much always going to require a company irregular ops report. That will cover you for both NTSB and FAA since the company will notify whoever needs to be notified, and that will be part of the SMS so the data won't be ignored.

If you did absolutely nothing wrong, that's all you need to do.

If you might have goofed, then do an ASAP only. If anyone asks why you didn't do an IOR, tell them you filed an ASAP and then shut up.

galaxy flyer
03-03-2018, 12:11 PM
Hereís the final rule, basically if you are on an IFR Flight Plan, a RA that is followed must be reported.

https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2015-12-15/pdf/2015-30758.pdf

830.5 Immediate notification.
The operator of any civil aircraft, or any public aircraft not operated by the Armed Forces or an intelligence agency of the United States, or any foreign aircraft shall immediately, and by the most expeditious means available, notify the nearest National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) office,1 when:
(a) An aircraft accident or any of the following listed serious incidents occur:
* * * * *
(10) Airborne Collision and Avoidance System (ACAS) resolution advisories issued when an aircraft is being operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan and compliance with the advisory is necessary to avert a substantial risk of collision between two or more aircraft.



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