Airline Pilot Forums

Airline Pilot Forums was designed to be a community where working airline pilots can share ideas and information about the aviation field. In the forum you will find information about major and regional airline carriers, career training, interview and job seeker help, finance, and living the airline pilot lifestyle.




friend
03-14-2018, 11:10 AM
Is compass in-house training or contracted to flight safety.

I also heard rumor is compass training is your on your own and all self study. For those in training Correct me if I am wrong. Intital first hire pass ratio doesnít look good


poorflyer
03-14-2018, 11:35 AM
Is compass in-house training or contracted to flight safety.

I also heard rumor is compass training is your on your own and all self study. For those in training Correct me if I am wrong. Intital first hire pass ratio doesnít look good

Compass is in-house training with line pilots and an assortment of retired Northwest guys. You're pretty much on your own for studying but you have all the materials at hand and I think that's why some are having trouble. Also I've heard theres an assortment of cfi, retired military, and rotar, guys so there might be a problem trying to mend the curriculum for such an assortment of experience. It's also an AQP program so if you need more training you'll receive it and too my knowledge on most events it won't be on your PRIA. So when you hear people are failing, it's probably a mix of people repeating training events as well as not passing a checkride event like an LOE. Try not to focus on that, it will worry you. Imagine you've already passed and train to the level you think an airline pilot should be.

Beechnutz
03-14-2018, 11:37 AM
Itís in house training. You go to orientation day then head home for two weeks to work on CBTís.

Then return for two weeks of 8-4:30 classroom. After that itís shorter days of Flight Procedure trainers (think touch screen computer based simulator). Followed by full motion sims.

You are taught a ton of info and expected to study after class everyday. No different than any other 121 training.


morerightrudder
03-14-2018, 02:29 PM
The sims in STL are rented from FlightSafety, but it's all CP instructors doing the instruction and checking. Our instructor group used to be mostly seniority list active pilots, but many have gone back to the line to get their turbine PIC so they can leave.

CP's training program was designed for people with prior airline experience. The systems portion is basically self study via the CBTs, and systems class itself is review/ask questions. It has not changed much from what I've heard, so now with the typical new hire profile no longer being refugees from other regionals, there's naturally been an uptick in people needing more training. It helps to get instrument proficient (not just current) before starting, and if you have a good attitude and put in the work, you'll make it through.

Fpmx772
03-14-2018, 03:26 PM
Like any airline, itís always self study. We provide you with the necessary tools to
Get through new hire but ultimately it is up to you and your sim partner to put in the time to go over flows and call outs.

mpet
03-14-2018, 04:38 PM
if you can't make it through compass training good luck elsewhere with the exception of Mesa

JetDoc
03-14-2018, 06:35 PM
If there is any increase in the the failure rate it is purely related to the quality of the applicants currently available. Plenty of CFI types have made it through in the last 18 months.

Fpmx772
03-14-2018, 07:27 PM
If there is any increase in the the failure rate it is purely related to the quality of the applicants currently available. Plenty of CFI types have made it through in the last 18 months.

I deff agree with you on this. For whatever reason we have had a big spike in re training and loe failures. Not sure if guys arenít taking it serious or maybe they think cpz will spoon feed them. Either way it has become an issue and now the current FOs on line are suffering. I watched my FO today get JR manned via ACARs. I feel bad for them so please, any new hire coming here, study your butt off and donít slack off! Take this serious and we will see
You guys/Gals on line!

Workless
03-15-2018, 03:59 AM
CFI that went through training in 2015. No repeated lessons/failures. Found it to be pretty easy overall but I did put in the work. The first couple months on the line were much more challenging.

boilers2
03-15-2018, 09:30 AM
Anyone know the training footprint from orientation to starting IOE?

Beechnutz
03-15-2018, 12:11 PM
No because it changes so much.

The first month is pretty set. Orientation day 1. Then two weeks home doing CBTs. Then back for Monday through Friday for two weeks. Then it gets complicated with FPTís and Sims.

But that gives you an idea.

Fpmx772
03-16-2018, 09:42 AM
Anyone know the training footprint from orientation to starting IOE?

The footprint itself is around 28 training days i believe. But Iím reality it will take anywhere from 1-3 months before actually getting to ioe. It all depends on sim availability and if you/your sim partner have any events that could need retraining.

Terrain
03-16-2018, 09:35 PM
It all depends on sim availability and if you/your sim partner have any events that could need retraining.

Training scheduling has been spotty lately, to say the least.

I know a sim team, both of whom passed all their FPT (procedures training) events without requiring retraining, but were put on hold for nearly a month before starting sim training.

I have met trainees who passed all their events, but their partners required retraining on multiple events (FPT and sim), and so the trainees ended up getting held back an additional 6-8 weeks, essentially acting as seat support while their partners catch up.

One trainee's partner quit after failing FTP 5. As of today, this trainee still hasn't reached MV, and he started ground school first week of December 2017! His new partner seems to require retraining on every second or third event. The trainee had prior 121 experience and had been helping his partner (very experienced CFI) out as best he can (reviewing flows and callouts, giving tips on flying the sim, etc.), but he can only do so much. A sim instructor pulled the trainee aside after the partner failed a sim session, and said the training department has got to figure out how to get the two of them separated so the trainee can finish and get on the line.

morerightrudder
03-21-2018, 03:28 PM
At least a CFI from a professional flight school should be relatively decent on instruments. We're now taking CFIs from mom-and-pop FBOs (so little if any IFR experience) and "flew a Cessna 100 hours a year for 15 years 15 years ago" types of folks.

BobbyLeeSwagger
03-21-2018, 03:41 PM
At least a CFI from a professional flight school should be relatively decent on instruments. We're now taking CFIs from mom-and-pop FBOs (so little if any IFR experience) and "flew a Cessna 100 hours a year for 15 years 15 years ago" types of folks.

Ha! Describes my background

Taco280AI
03-21-2018, 04:57 PM
And us rotor guys who fly instruments once or twice a year :D

BobbyLeeSwagger
03-21-2018, 05:14 PM
And us rotor guys who fly instruments once or twice a year :D

Haha, it's fine. We don't fly instrument approaches anyway, we fly visuals, and when its time for the magic to happen on downwind, my SOP call out is always the same: "shake n bake baby!"

poorflyer
03-21-2018, 05:26 PM
Haha, it's fine. We don't fly instrument approaches anyway, we fly visuals, and when its time for the magic to happen on downwind, my SOP call out is always the same: "shake n bake baby!"

Except certain night visuals, because even that is too much flying for us. I kid I kid.

emersonbiguns
03-21-2018, 05:27 PM
And us rotor guys who fly instruments once or twice a year :D

Try helo guy in AZ. I saw a cloud last October and canceled flying for the day.

Poser765
03-22-2018, 02:48 AM
Except certain night visuals, because even that is too much flying for us. I kid I kid.lol but you aren't kidding, now are you?



Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1