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sailingfun
03-16-2018, 07:10 AM
It appears the jump was intentional. The hard to believe part is they loaded her into the ambulance and the flight pushed back and left with the original crew.

Emirates flight attendant dies after tumbling from plane in Uganda | Daily Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5506141/Female-flight-attendant-dies-tumbling-Emirates-plane.html)


aviatorhi
03-16-2018, 07:23 AM
I don't find that hard to believe considering the airline.

rickair7777
03-16-2018, 05:42 PM
That's one of the reasons widebodies normally crew more than the minimum FA's.


PowderFinger
03-17-2018, 07:41 AM
That's one of the reasons widebodies normally crew more than the minimum FA's.

Yep.

What really matters... Did the flight block out on time?

sailingfun
03-17-2018, 10:47 AM
That's one of the reasons widebodies normally crew more than the minimum FA's.

So they can leave one of their crew members who they are aware is critically injured alone in a foreign country with perhaps not the best care. The Captain who agreed to that should not ever serve in a command position again.

LNL76
03-17-2018, 12:31 PM
It may have been her only way out of that crap airline. Poor woman.

:(

ShyGuy
03-17-2018, 02:44 PM
Nice trashing of Emirates. Because no one could have a mental sickness or depression. It had to be the employers fault. Luckily no crew member in the United States has ever taken their own life :rolleyes:

The Dominican
03-17-2018, 08:22 PM
So they can leave one of their crew members who they are aware is critically injured alone in a foreign country with perhaps not the best care. The Captain who agreed to that should not ever serve in a command position again.

That's not the captain's job..., after the medics were called and she was on her way to a hospital, it is the station manager's job to continue to monitor the situation.

Of course you would be worried sick for this crew member, But you would cancel the flight and ride in the ambulance holding her hand? That's not your job nor your place..., most likely she wouldn't want you there in the first place.:rolleyes:

NYC Pilot
03-17-2018, 09:30 PM
That's not the captain's job..., after the medics were called and she was on her way to a hospital, it is the station manager's job to continue to monitor the situation.

Of course you would be worried sick for this crew member, But you would cancel the flight and ride in the ambulance holding her hand? That's not your job nor your place..., most likely she wouldn't want you there in the first place.:rolleyes:

Couldn't have said it better myself. Funny how some people think.

RemoveB4flght
03-17-2018, 11:21 PM
So they can leave one of their crew members who they are aware is critically injured alone in a foreign country with perhaps not the best care. The Captain who agreed to that should not ever serve in a command position again.

I'm not sure which air ambulance you are flying for, but I am quite sure no scheduled airline is equipped to transport a "critically injured" passenger, particularly one with probable head trauma, with no attending medical personnel on board to treat her, no way to evaluate the extent of her injuries, no way to properly stabilize her for hours of travel, and precious few viable alternate airport options between Uganda and UAE.

You're absolutely right, what a completely inept and baseless command decision.

Now if you want to argue whether he should have cancelled the flight and stayed in Uganda, there were company ground staff and another crew on layover on hand. He waited with her until an ambulance arrived and loaded her for transport. Once in the hospital since he is not family or her husband, he is in no position to make decisions regarding her care.

sailingfun
03-18-2018, 08:14 AM
I'm not sure which air ambulance you are flying for, but I am quite sure no scheduled airline is equipped to transport a "critically injured" passenger, particularly one with probable head trauma, with no attending medical personnel on board to treat her, no way to evaluate the extent of her injuries, no way to properly stabilize her for hours of travel, and precious few viable alternate airport options between Uganda and UAE.

You're absolutely right, what a completely inept and baseless command decision.

Now if you want to argue whether he should have cancelled the flight and stayed in Uganda, there were company ground staff and another crew on layover on hand. He waited with her until an ambulance arrived and loaded her for transport. Once in the hospital since he is not family or her husband, he is in no position to make decisions regarding her care.

My airline does it differently. A crew member would stay with the injured crew member. There would also be a requirement to insure all other crew members were fit and mentally ready to operate the flight. This is not a combat operation. A break back at the hotel for a rest period would be appropriate. There is no way that crew was functioning at a normal level after what they all witnessed. They would have been distracted at almost the highest level possible short of being informed of the death of a immediate family member.

NYC Pilot
03-19-2018, 10:03 PM
My airline does it differently. A crew member would stay with the injured crew member. There would also be a requirement to insure all other crew members were fit and mentally ready to operate the flight. This is not a combat operation. A break back at the hotel for a rest period would be appropriate. There is no way that crew was functioning at a normal level after what they all witnessed. They would have been distracted at almost the highest level possible short of being informed of the death of a immediate family member.

I totally agree that the crew aboard that flight must have been traumatized.

zombiepilot
03-20-2018, 10:36 PM
My airline does it differently. A crew member would stay with the injured crew member. There would also be a requirement to insure all other crew members were fit and mentally ready to operate the flight. This is not a combat operation. A break back at the hotel for a rest period would be appropriate. There is no way that crew was functioning at a normal level after what they all witnessed. They would have been distracted at almost the highest level possible short of being informed of the death of a immediate family member.


Where do you fly? Iím applying. No joke.

Grumble
03-22-2018, 10:26 AM
Nice trashing of Emirates. Because no one could have a mental sickness or depression. It had to be the employers fault. Luckily no crew member in the United States has ever taken their own life :rolleyes:

EK fired a pregnant FA and left her in South Africa when she went into labor.

The place is deplorable.

NYC Pilot
03-22-2018, 07:21 PM
EK fired a pregnant FA and left her in South Africa when she went into labor.

The place is deplorable.

With all due respect, how could this incident even be possible? No one close to giving birth is working as a flight attendant lol it's laughable what you just said.

Lugar
03-22-2018, 07:32 PM
EK fired a pregnant FA and left her in South Africa when she went into labor.

The place is deplorable.

No they didnít. I know what youíre speaking about and you have the story entirely wrong. As soon as you become pregnant, youíre on mandatory leave at EK.

ShyGuy
03-24-2018, 08:21 PM
Yup. The airline pilot version of "fake news" to trash someone or an organization.



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