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Mike1234567
04-03-2018, 06:07 PM
Hello Iím a high school student deciding if I should become a pilot, I have 2 genes of factor V Leiden (a blood clotting disorder) I am In athletic shape and I was wondering if I would be able to pass the class 1 medical exam with that condition, Iím really in need of some advice.
Thanks!


rickair7777
04-03-2018, 06:33 PM
Do you actually have a diagnosed disorder, or just have genetic markers?

busdriver12
04-05-2018, 06:53 AM
I don't know if that's even something that one would have to disclose. But have you actually had a blood clot, and that is why you found out? Or is it something you were tested for because of heredity? Most people with this issue never even have a blood clot, but they're at increased risk. You certainly wouldn't have to disclose something just because your parents had the genes.

Regardless, if you go into aviation or if you just go on flights longer than 3.5 hours, you need to be careful. Deep vein thrombosis sucks, and it can kill you or at least take you out of flying for awhile. Compression socks, baby aspirin, walk around, move your feet from the ankle, be careful. And if you're an athlete, you're even more at risk of air travel DVT's. They would probably give you blood thinners if you developed a clot and continue you on them, I think

I'm not saying this to scare you off aviation in any way, whatsoever. But you have more information than most people who have this mutation, as most people are unaware until something bad happens. And by being proactive, you can prevent clots.


Excargodog
04-09-2018, 02:31 PM
DVT and Pulmonary embolus occur at the rate of approximately one event per thousand person years in individuals over forty. Having the Leiden mutation will push that up between five and seven times, which means most people with the mutation will still NEVER have an event.

The last I was aware in the absence of an event, having the mutation was not an issue for the FAA, but if an event does occur they would probably insist that you be appropriately anti coagulated before they would give you a special issuance. Realistically, all this would be doing was compelling you to take the smart medical choice.

Whether you fly an aircraft or do any number of other quasi-sedentary jobs, you are going to be at more risk than the average joe(or Jill), for DVTs or PEs but there are a lot of things you can do to somewhat mitigate the risk.

Don't let a genetic test define you. Do what you want in the most prudent fashion possible. If that's a career in aviation, go for it.

rickair7777
04-09-2018, 03:10 PM
DVT and Pulmonary embolus occur at the rate of approximately one event per thousand person years in individuals over forty. Having the Leiden mutation will push that up between five and seven times, which means most people with the mutation will still NEVER have an event.

The last I was aware in the absence of an event, having the mutation was not an issue for the FAA, but if an event does occur they would probably insist that you be appropriately anti coagulated before they would give you a special issuance. Realistically, all this would be doing was compelling you to take the smart medical choice.

Whether you fly an aircraft or do any number of other quasi-sedentary jobs, you are going to be at more risk than the average joe(or Jill), for DVTs or PEs but there are a lot of things you can do to somewhat mitigate the risk.

Don't let a genetic test define you. Do what you want in the most prudent fashion possible. If that's a career in aviation, go for it.

I have never heard of a genetic marker, absent anything else, being a diagnostic criteria for anything. The FAA doesn't ask about genetic markers, and I've never heard of anyone else asking either.

It's useful info for the individual, and should be considered informative.

Excargodog
04-09-2018, 06:37 PM
I have never heard of a genetic marker, absent anything else, being a diagnostic criteria for anything. The FAA doesn't ask about genetic markers, and I've never heard of anyone else asking either.

It's useful info for the individual, and should be considered informative.

The US Air Force USED TO use sickle-cell trait as a disqualifier for UPT, even in the absence of any problems whatsoever. Fortunately, smarter people intervened and got that criteria thrown out.

Chances are that all of us have some mutation somewhere, maybe even a lethal recessive or three. Genetics - especially HUMAN genetics - have always been one big crap shoot.

But for the love of God, if somebody is going to tell a kid about a genetic issue, at least they ought to give them proper counseling. It doesn't seem that was done in this case. IMHO.