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AirBear
04-11-2018, 07:26 AM
Excel landed on 10R at FLL under blue skies. By the time they taxied to the FBO ramp a storm had moved in and wound up dropping a funnel cloud about 100 feet in front of them. The crew saw the line guys running for their lives and prudently decided to stop the jet. Here's a YouTube link with Video from the FBO camera:

https://youtu.be/nZefsMHiJ-Y

The FedEx containers caused major damage to the jet, probably more than $1M.

Here's the delay message the Captain sent the company:

Tornado hit airplane. Unknown delay, large fedex container lodged into back of wing. Don't think plane will fly with container attached, don't think container will fit in baggage compartment. Both pilot seats possibly soiled. Will keep you up to date. :p


BoilerUP
04-11-2018, 07:39 AM
Ouch!

That a NJA Excel? A bit hard to tell...

AirBear
04-11-2018, 07:46 AM
Ouch!

That a NJA Excel? A bit hard to tell...

Yes, and unfortunately it was an XLS, not one of the older XL's they're getting rid of anyway. Murphy's Law.


JohnBurke
04-11-2018, 08:48 AM
Seems hard to believe that it was clear skies, given the obvious clouds. Storms don't form and spawn tornadoes in the time it takes to land and taxi clear; the system had to have been visible plainly and on radar.

Another aircraft lands (downwind) right behind the citation as the camera is bouncing around and shipping containers are tumbling into view. Basic airmanship might suggest a more prudent approach, like diverting.

A rope twister formed near an airport where I was working last year. We had a fire call about the same time, or just before. It didn't take a lot of watching the weather to refuse the flight, and shortly after that, we were filming a tornado. Certainly tornadoes can develop quickly, but they don't come from nowhere. It's also best if everyone in the area is prepared by not flying near such convective conditions in the first place.

AirBear
04-11-2018, 10:49 AM
Look at the start of the video. You can see clear skies in the left 1/3 of the screen. The crew said it was a very rough ride down final, with a big direction split with winds aloft from surface winds. I don't know what was showing on radar, but I've had a small, innocent looking rain shower set off the wind shear warning in a 737. Near BOS one day I had a shower that wasn't more than 1/4 mile in diameter send out a bolt of lightning. Definitely got our attention.

FlyJSH
04-12-2018, 04:58 PM
Containers that were (presumably) un-chocked/brakes not set; I'm curious if FedEx will be footing the bill.

HwkrPlt
04-13-2018, 01:52 AM
Containers that were (presumably) un-chocked/brakes not set; I'm curious if FedEx will be footing the bill.

I'm sure there are a bunch of lawyers getting ready to debate that very issue.

JohnBurke
04-13-2018, 05:46 AM
Look at the start of the video. You can see clear skies in the left 1/3 of the screen. The crew said it was a very rough ride down final, with a big direction split with winds aloft from surface winds. I don't know what was showing on radar, but I've had a small, innocent looking rain shower set off the wind shear warning in a 737. Near BOS one day I had a shower that wasn't more than 1/4 mile in diameter send out a bolt of lightning. Definitely got our attention.

I see the "clear skies" to the left of the frame...which are not clear skies. I also see a lot of dark sky, and the fact that a tornado touches down adjacent to the aircraft is proof positive that it was NOT clear skies. If indeed this was a tornado, the fact that the crew landed and taxied in during such conditions, or the aircraft seen landing right behind them, downwind, adjacent to a tornado, doesn't speak well at all for the decision making that was going on in either cockpit.

It's pretty tough to be surprised by a tornado after approaching in a radar-equipped turbine airplane and landing at a towered airfield. It's not like they simply generate from blue skies. They don't.

Containers that were (presumably) un-chocked/brakes not set; I'm curious if FedEx will be footing the bill.

Container brakes? Chocks? No. They're containers.

There were four containers in a train that passed the Citation, which were on wheels and together, but the rest were not.

"Act of God" springs to mind, for insurance purposes.

SonicFlyer
04-13-2018, 10:31 AM
If indeed this was a tornado, the fact that the crew landed and taxied in during such conditions, or the aircraft seen landing right behind them, downwind, adjacent to a tornado, doesn't speak well at all for the decision making that was going on in either cockpit. What about ATC?! Where the hell were they? :confused:

Why didn't they call a missed?

SonicFlyer
04-13-2018, 10:33 AM
In 2006 a tornado destroyed ERAUs fleet on the ramp in Daytona.

https://commons.erau.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1690&context=jaaer

There was a news article saying that the tower was still clearing people to land as the tornado was barreling across the field :mad:

FlyJSH
04-13-2018, 02:34 PM
Container brakes? Chocks? No. They're containers.

There were four containers in a train that passed the Citation, which were on wheels and together, but the rest were not.

"Act of God" springs to mind, for insurance purposes.



Yes, they are containers. And some containers have casters. Do these? The resolution on my screen isn't good enough to tell. Sorry.

When an ABX container with wheels rolled into one of our aircraft some 20 years ago, it was ABX that paid for the repairs. That impact was caused by the container rolling down a sloping ramp, not wind. I, having never attended law school, was simply wondering if it would legally be an act of your God smiting a sinful Citation, or if the container wranglers would be faulted for failing to corral the strays.

JohnBurke
04-13-2018, 08:26 PM
Yes, they are containers. And some containers have casters. Do these? The resolution on my screen isn't good enough to tell. Sorry.

When an ABX container with wheels rolled into one of our aircraft some 20 years ago, it was ABX that paid for the repairs. That impact was caused by the container rolling down a sloping ramp, not wind. I, having never attended law school, was simply wondering if it would legally be an act of your God smiting a sinful Citation, or if the container wranglers would be faulted for failing to corral the strays.

I've never seen a container with wheels. Fancy. One would think they'd get tied up in the rollers and mechanism on the cargo deck, wouldn't one?

When a microburst or tornado picks up containers and blows them across the ramp, it's not really a failing to "corral them." One could sue the storm, however.

Or the pilot that elected to land during said storm. How 'bout them apples?

dera
04-14-2018, 02:44 PM
I wonder what the fuel truck guy was thinking when refueling a plane with an obvious thunderstorm nearby?

AirBear
04-14-2018, 05:13 PM
I wonder what the fuel truck guy was thinking when refueling a plane with an obvious thunderstorm nearby?

He may not have had much choice until lightning got within 3 or 5 miles (can't remember which) and they close the ramp. That could also vary by airport.

MrBojangles
04-22-2018, 10:01 AM
whats with the airplane going down the runway at the height of the storm?! and with mostly a tailwind too!

AirBear
04-22-2018, 05:59 PM
whats with the airplane going down the runway at the height of the storm?! and with mostly a tailwind too!

Tower was caught unaware when the Tornado was reported. Just one of those freak things where a minor rain shower managed to drop a funnel cloud. Crew reported winds were very variable on final so who knows what tower was calling winds when giving takeoff clearances.



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