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View Full Version : Antidote for pilot stress?


Macchi30
04-20-2018, 05:25 AM
Has anyone here ever experienced anxiety or stress for no particular reason? Or a feeling of like ďwhat am I doing?Ē

Itís very discouraging and frustrating for me. Iím a commercial student with just over 150 hours and Iíve never had this issue until recently. I donít know why but I recently have been getting very anxious before flights. I did a XC Solo last week and the whole flight all I could think about was landing. My palms were sweating the whole flight too. For no reason. Or today, I was suppose to go flying but I flagged myself on the ďSĒ of the IMSAFE checklist, so I canceled.

This is all just very frustrating. I want this to go away so I can enjoy the rest of my commercial training.


rickair7777
04-20-2018, 07:15 AM
Be careful with this, if you get diagnosed (or medicated) for any sort of anxiety disorder it will be a lengthy struggle to get your medical back. But if this is affecting your daily life, don't hesitate to get professional help if needed.

If you haven't really had depression/anxiety before then look at what may have changed with your lifestyle recently...

Long hours, new school/job, stress at school/work, relationship stress, living in a new place, all can contribute.

Also if you are subject to stress, it's vital that you live a healthy balanced lifestyle... minimal booze, plenty of sleep and exercise, and give yourself whatever time off you need (some daily down time, and one day off per week). Not kidding about this part, situational anxiety probably reflects on your overall mental outlook, ie it's the symptom of something broader.

If the anxiety/stress only has to do with flying, then you might just be able to work through that (you can google it). If some aspect of flying is bothering you, then try to do a few flights avoiding that aspect. Make sure you understand aerodynamics... some maneuvers (like stalls) which might seem utterly terrifying to a layman are complete non-events if you understand what and why the airplane is doing what it's doing. I have a friend who got badly scared in a plane once as a student, and her instructors had to treat her with kid gloves for a while until she got over it. She had pretty bad anxiety in certain conditions for a while but she gutted it out and got over it (she's at DAL now).

Macchi30
04-20-2018, 07:53 AM
. Be careful with this, if you get diagnosed (or medicated) for any sort of anxiety disorder it will be a lengthy struggle to get your medical back. But if this is affecting your daily life, don't hesitate to get professional help if needed.

If you haven't really had depression/anxiety before then look at what may have changed with your lifestyle recently...

Long hours, new school/job, stress at school/work, relationship stress, living in a new place, all can contribute.

Also if you are subject to stress, it's vital that you live a healthy balanced lifestyle... minimal booze, plenty of sleep and exercise, and give yourself whatever time off you need (some daily down time, and one day off per week). Not kidding about this part, situational anxiety probably reflects on your overall mental outlook, ie it's the symptom of something broader.

If the anxiety/stress only has to do with flying, then you might just be able to work through that (you can google it). If some aspect of flying is bothering you, then try to do a few flights avoiding that aspect. Make sure you understand aerodynamics... some maneuvers (like stalls) which might seem utterly terrifying to a layman are complete non-events if you understand what and why the airplane is doing what it's doing. I have a friend who got badly scared in a plane once as a student, and her instructors had to treat her with kid gloves for a while until she got over it. She had pretty bad anxiety in certain conditions for a while but she gutted it out and got over it (she's at DAL now).

Oh Iím aware of this. I think I will go see a therapist for talk therapy (they donít diagnose or perscribe meds).

Nothing has changed significantly in my life recently and I feel Iím a healthy person (eat healthy, exercise, rarely drink, never smoke).

Like in your last paragraph, I think itís flying related. Which bothers me a lot because Iím a commercial student. I shouldnít just be getting these feelings with where I am. I did great on both my private and instrument check rides. I know what Iím doing, but Iím just been getting nervous and stressed lately. Like my confidence has dropped off. The only thing I can think of is I did have some worrisome flights in the past.. my very first flight in IMC during instrument we had a vacuum system failure while in overcast IMC during an ILS approach, in a steam gauge. ILS failed too. My instructor took the controls and we had to get vectored out. Then another time (which bothered me the most) we were flying at night during my long Instrument XC in a BRAND NEW C172S G1000, the plane wasnt even 6 months old but at night with nothing but dark black terrain below us our #1 CHT gauge redlined at 500 degrees. That bothered me a lot, to think our engine of a brand new plane could have failed like that at night and we surely would have went into the forest. I tried to forget these feelings. But maybe they are resurfacing now? Like a matter of trusting the plane and all? I donít know.


rickair7777
04-20-2018, 09:13 AM
That's what happened to my friend, got scared (for good reason), and had a post-trauma kind of thing going on. Talking to a counselor might help, but I'd read the fine print on the medical form first to make sure you're not going to trigger a reporting requirement.

General aviation is not the safest activity in the world, may just need to accept that. The good news is there's so much redundancy in airline aviation that failures and problems are mostly annoyances and nuisances, and you'll probably never actually be afraid in airliner. Even an engine failure (like SWA the other day) is very well rehearsed by the crew and well within the envelope of the airplane.

Macchi30
04-20-2018, 09:55 AM
I wonít flag anything. For therapy services the confidentiality agreement is just in regards to self harm or harm of others. Anxiety/stress isnít reportable.

Yes I know youíre right. Iím sure I wouldnít feel like this in the airlines. I know itís true how GA isnít the safest thing in the world. I just need to get into the mentality that I dont care anymore (but stay responsible of course)

Macchi30
04-20-2018, 10:12 AM
That's what happened to my friend, got scared (for good reason), and had a post-trauma kind of thing going on.

How did your friend overcome his issue?

leardriver
04-20-2018, 11:41 AM
Has anyone here ever experienced anxiety or stress for no particular reason? Or a feeling of like “what am I doing?”

It’s very discouraging and frustrating for me. I’m a commercial student with just over 150 hours and I’ve never had this issue until recently. I don’t know why but I recently have been getting very anxious before flights. I did a XC Solo last week and the whole flight all I could think about was landing. My palms were sweating the whole flight too. For no reason. Or today, I was suppose to go flying but I flagged myself on the “S” of the IMSAFE checklist, so I canceled.

This is all just very frustrating. I want this to go away so I can enjoy the rest of my commercial training.

Maybe the answer for you would be to stop flying. It’s not for everybody.

I tried to be a international real estate tycoon. I was an epic failure. I don’t have the skill set for that. No matter how hard I try. I would not succeed. My best friend did follow that path and has more money than he could spend in a lifetime. He owns his own private jet.

As for me. Because I’m the kind of person that is weird to handle stress and fear in real life and death situations. Plus I always loved operating fast dangerous machines as a young person. Dirt bikes, snowmobiles, cart racing, aerobatic airplanes. Basically anything I could get my hands on that was loud and fast. I ended up turning my skill set into a living.

Please don’t take offense. But the key to your future may be understanding what it is you are really supposed to be doing.

You may want to be a pilot. But ask yourself if you were made to be one.

I hope you figure it out and are happy with whatever your future turns out to be. Good luck.

zerozero
04-20-2018, 12:07 PM
You might be training too hard. Perhaps you need a break, especially after a few stressful training events.

Good to know you're healthy overall, but I know too much caffeine can sometimes exacerbate an anxiety attack. Obviously you find caffeine in more than just coffee: soda pop and energy drinks. You might want to look at your diet too.

Good luck.

Macchi30
04-20-2018, 12:40 PM
Maybe the answer for you would be to stop flying. Itís not for everybody

Thatís depressing to think about.


The thing is, Iíve done dangerous things in the past. I used to be an infantryman and I spent a year in Afghanistan. I also have spent 4 years doing Armed Security for the government. I just donít understand why all of a sudden half way through my commercial Iím having anxiety

Swedish Blender
04-20-2018, 01:30 PM
Maybe your anxiety/stress is goal related. Try taking a day and getting the $100 hamburger. Make it a fun day instead of "I have to do this" day.

I had an ACP walk in and say,"So, taking the company jet for a beer, huh." We were headed to Germany.:D

leardriver
04-20-2018, 02:15 PM
Thatís depressing to think about.


The thing is, Iíve done dangerous things in the past. I used to be an infantryman and I spent a year in Afghanistan. I also have spent 4 years doing Armed Security for the government. I just donít understand why all of a sudden half way through my commercial Iím having anxiety

Oh, well in that case. Scratch everything I said. Fear is definitely not your issue. Sorry.

Thanks for your service. 🇺🇸

rickair7777
04-20-2018, 03:08 PM
Thatís depressing to think about.


The thing is, Iíve done dangerous things in the past. I used to be an infantryman and I spent a year in Afghanistan. I also have spent 4 years doing Armed Security for the government. I just donít understand why all of a sudden half way through my commercial Iím having anxiety

It's probably a control thing. You knew what you were doing in the infantry. Or maybe you're having some lingering PTSD from the time in the desert?

Anyway, probably best to talk to someone to help sort it out.

Again read the fine print on the medical form, the FAA and DOJ don't think that patient confidentiality applies to them at all.

rickair7777
04-20-2018, 03:14 PM
How did your friend overcome his issue?


She almost got killed after an instructor flew her into severe storm/wind conditions (mountain pass) in IMC. Airplane went inverted and gyros tumbled. She was very nervous flying IMC afterwards, and it got much worse if it rained.

We (the instructor team) took it upon ourselves to fix her, by putting her back on the horse. Got her comfortable in VFR, then under the hood, then struggled through flying in clouds and finally rain. It worked in her case, although I think she was a little nervous in rain for a while. But like I said she's at DAL now. Not sure if our method was what a medical professional would suggest but it worked. Given your military background I'm guessing it might work for you too, although I'm no professional. Sometimes you don't have to like it, you just have to do it...

Excargodog
04-20-2018, 03:22 PM
That’s depressing to think about.


The thing is, I’ve done dangerous things in the past. I used to be an infantryman and I spent a year in Afghanistan. I also have spent 4 years doing Armed Security for the government. I just don’t understand why all of a sudden half way through my commercial I’m having anxiety

I lost a vacuum pump while IFR in IMC, and it was a sobering experience. Single pilot IFR, for a newbie, is right at the edge of your capabilities, even under the best of circumstances. Yeah, I know, you can do it all on needle ball and airspeed, but it's rough to drop on a newbie which, fortunately, I wasn't. In the Garmin G5 era, it would be nice if we got rid of vacuum ADIs altogether. Had it happened as I was learning, it probably would have put me off flying for awhile. That's not cowardice, just human nature.

You might want to do a little soul-searching or simply hedge your bets with something like an iPad running a synthetic vision app until you get your confidence back. Start with simple stuff and gradually increase what you do until you regain your confidence. If it costs you 10-12 hours of working up to doing commercial level stuff, so be it. Yeah, that may be a couple grand, but in the grand scheme of things, that's not that big.

tomgoodman
04-20-2018, 03:43 PM
The two equipment failures (vacuum system & CHT gauge) mean that your anxiety did have a reason. This is normal, and every time you successfully deal with a problem your confidence will increase. Eventually, the worst stresses in your career will be late hotel vans, lousy bid packages, and early simulator report times. ;)

Ski Bird
04-20-2018, 04:20 PM
The thing is, I’ve done dangerous things in the past...

I bet it's a control issue (or, more accurately a sense of not having any).

When your equipment failed (or nearly did), your brain went into overdrive assessing your options and determining what, if anything, you could do about it.

You persevered.

You successfully got through it and walked away. But then ... the tiny little lizard part of your brain couldn't let it go.

(the part that makes your heart race when you're scared and wants to keep you alive no matter what)

It reviewed the tapes, and got worried for you.

You probably lost some sleep over it, had intrusive thoughts, and now the lizard brain is throwing up red flags any time you step toward a similar situation.

No worries, you'll get through this. Focus on the failure. Make it an academic, rather than emotional event. Turn it into a learning opportunity (i.e. wrest control away from that little b***tard ... if only a little bit, and after the fact)

What went wrong? What component did you lose, can you live without it, what were your options? What did you do right? What could you have done differently?

But for sure I would take some baby steps before you re-accomplish the 'worst case' scenario.

Take a few flights where the objective is just to beat the pattern up or do some day VFR ... you can ease back into the night IMC cross-country stuff, after you're comfortably back in the saddle.

Happy Hunting!

Macchi30
04-20-2018, 04:53 PM
She almost got killed after an instructor flew her into severe storm/wind conditions (mountain pass) in IMC. Airplane went inverted and gyros tumbled. She was very nervous flying IMC afterwards, and it got much worse if it rained.

That sounds terrifying.

But I think you all might be onto something with the control aspect.

Excargodog
04-20-2018, 05:12 PM
That sounds terrifying.

But I think you all might be onto something with the control aspect.

And I think part of it is that in both cases (yours and hers) you really didn't get yourself out of it, the instructor did, leaving both of you sort of wondering if you COULD have gotten yourself out of it. And the fact is that you may or may not have been able to, BUT THAT'S OK. A trained instrument pilot is what you are expected to be after completion of the training, not during it.

Back off and take deliberate and measured steps in your flying to build up your confidence. Build on those successes. Be deliberate and keep with the cross check, VFR or IFR, night or day.

The odds of you getting through this are really quite good.

OH, and don't sweat a high CHT in a Cessna-172. If it happens suddenly, it's most likely a loose wire, which defaults to high temp in most cases. But either way, once you make the mixture full rich and maybe give it carb heat, you've really done everything you can do, so divert to the nearest practical field, land, and give it back to maintenance. It's their problem, not yours.

WhisperJet
04-20-2018, 05:37 PM
I think what you're experiencing is normal. Maybe reframe what you're doing. Go speak to kids about flying; or go sit in the backseat of a few lessons where you can watch someone else's performance. Take an aerobatics lesson. Or a seaplane lesson. Or glider lesson. Go to an airshow. Take a friend flying. Do some fun things that remind you of why you started flying in the first place. Maybe take a month off from training. You can get through this. If not, there's no shame.

Yoda2
04-20-2018, 10:16 PM
Has anyone here ever experienced anxiety or stress for no particular reason? Or a feeling of like “what am I doing?”

It’s very discouraging and frustrating for me. I’m a commercial student with just over 150 hours and I’ve never had this issue until recently. I don’t know why but I recently have been getting very anxious before flights. I did a XC Solo last week and the whole flight all I could think about was landing. My palms were sweating the whole flight too. For no reason. Or today, I was suppose to go flying but I flagged myself on the “S” of the IMSAFE checklist, so I canceled.

This is all just very frustrating. I want this to go away so I can enjoy the rest of my commercial training.

It's not uncommon to have some anxiety here and there at 150 Hrs. I would recommend carrying a paper bag within arms reach in case you hyperventilate. As you progress to around 350 > 500 hours you might actually get cocky and think you know everything; another time to really keep yourself in check.

SonicFlyer
04-20-2018, 10:33 PM
"Alcohol - the cause and solution of life's problems." - Homer (Simpson)

rpatte1637
04-21-2018, 12:18 AM
I flew pipeline inspection for four years and all the training in the world can't keep you from being stressed in some situations. I had a engine lose a cylinder about five mile from a airport at 200 feet. Your training kicks in and you deal with it as best as possible. When you land it on the runway then all the stress kicks in, but in the air you just automatically do what you were trained to do from your first private lessons. I had a time that I had to make a decision whether to land in a cow pasture or a highway, you weigh your option and make the best decision possible for you, but you walk away and if your lucky after the problem is fixed, you crank it up and fly it out. I had a oil pressure line spring a leak and by the time I was able to land, I was down to 5 psi, but again you keep a watch on what your plane is doing and keep your options open. I lost an alternator once in Mississippi, but I knew that as long as I turned off all the power everything would be ok, so I shut everything down, stayed over my pipeline and flew three hours home to Atlanta. When I reached the airport I turned the battery back on, made my calls, landed and had the mechanic repair it, enjoyed my weekend and was back Monday morning to start all over again. The main thing is to know your limitation and the limitation of the plane and remember these planes are tougher than you might think. When something does go wrong of course your going to have that "OH SH**" moment, but don't panic, keep an eyes and ears on what the plane is doing and fly the plane. The worst thing you can do is panic, once you get on the ground and out of the situation, then you can be stressed. Believe me I was a little stressed after i was on the ground in each of these situation, but I learned a lot from each and know why we train so much for them when we first start our training. Like one of the other poster said, take time out to enjoy just flying for a while. Even on my worst days of flying pipeline, I looked forward to the next day. I'm currently out on medical leave and can't wait to get back in the cockpit, which is more than I can say about any of my other previous jobs. I wish you the best of luck and remember this is suppose to be fun not work.

BMEP100
04-22-2018, 06:51 AM
Although not much talked about, diet or rather your body's reaction to certain foods can greatly affect your thyroid which in turn can affect your mood. This is more so,in women, but also shown to be true in men.

There is something called "the elimination diet", which is a good place to start. You will probably loose weight on it but for most North Americans, that's a good thing.

Also, take vitamin D3 supplements.

There are doctors that specialize in this area of medicine, but not many because insurance will pay for only some of the blood tests, and nearly none of the recommended supplements.

I know of one.

Look up "Leaky gut syndrome". It is a controversial diagnosis among the traditional medical community, because it requires extra training to treat, and there are no big pharmacy pills to prescribe (hence, no big money promoting study).

Macchi30
04-23-2018, 11:49 AM
Thanks to everyone who replied

Today was a beautiful day out, so I went flying through the DC SFRA with another commercial student on a XC. It was very smooth and I just thought about everything you all suggested and advised in this thread, and I actually felt much better.

TiredSoul
04-23-2018, 01:29 PM
Has anyone here ever experienced anxiety or stress for no particular reason? Or a feeling of like ďwhat am I doing

Yes, many times during flight training.
Sometimes I couldnít sleep the night before a flight. Especially a solo.
Youíre learning a skill that could potentially kill you or save your life.
Donít be afraid to make mistakes.
Trust the people around you.
I have returned from flights.
My brain just went to mush, Airport is behind you, turn back and land.
You may just be getting yourself too worked up.
Talk to your instructor and other students.
Iíd be very hesitant you talk to a counselor or therapist that knows nothing about aviation.

zerozero
04-23-2018, 06:48 PM
Iíd be very hesitant you talk to a counselor or therapist that knows nothing about aviation.

As long as no medication is prescribed there is no real concern about visiting a therapist. People should feel free to seek the help they need.

Glenntilton
04-23-2018, 07:04 PM
Although not much talked about, diet or rather your body's reaction to certain foods can greatly affect your thyroid which in turn can affect your mood. This is more so,in women, but also shown to be true in men.

There is something called "the elimination diet", which is a good place to start. You will probably loose weight on it but for most North Americans, that's a good thing.

Also, take vitamin D3 supplements.

There are doctors that specialize in this area of medicine, but not many because insurance will pay for only some of the blood tests, and nearly none of the recommended supplements.

I know of one.

Look up "Leaky gut syndrome". It is a controversial diagnosis among the traditional medical community, because it requires extra training to treat, and there are no big pharmacy pills to prescribe (hence, no big money promoting study).


If I can add anything to this, try "Calm" a magnesium powder.

rickair7777
04-24-2018, 07:16 AM
As long as no medication is prescribed there is no real concern about visiting a therapist. People should feel free to seek the help they need.

Not true. It likely needs to be reported on your FAA medical.

If a diagnosis of a grounding condition was made, you are responsible to ground yourself. Lack of medication does not equal lack of diagnosis,

Keep in mind any medical professional is going to take notes. You can open up a big can of worms as a pilot, typical mental health professional will make the diagnosis pretty quickly, toss you a bottle of prozac and tell you to come back in six months. At that point you're unemployed and facing a long road to get your medical back.

An "aviation savvy" medical provider can help talk you through some things and provide some lifestyle advice without being too quick on the draw with a grounding diagnosis. These problems exist on a spectrum, traditional providers will throw meds at even the lower end of the spectrum but that's not always necessary.


Now with all that said, if you're having serious trouble, get help immediately. Worry about flying later.

zerozero
04-24-2018, 10:02 AM
Not true. It likely needs to be reported on your FAA medical.

If a diagnosis of a grounding condition was made, you are responsible to ground yourself. Lack of medication does not equal lack of diagnosis,

Keep in mind any medical professional is going to take notes. You can open up a big can of worms as a pilot, typical mental health professional will make the diagnosis pretty quickly, toss you a bottle of prozac and tell you to come back in six months. At that point you're unemployed and facing a long road to get your medical back.

An "aviation savvy" medical provider can help talk you through some things and provide some lifestyle advice without being too quick on the draw with a grounding diagnosis. These problems exist on a spectrum, traditional providers will throw meds at even the lower end of the spectrum but that's not always necessary.


Now with all that said, if you're having serious trouble, get help immediately. Worry about flying later.

Lots of really bad advice here, but I'm not gonna argue about it.

Look, everyone has problems. Some people have stresses in their life and need extra help. Money, deaths, marriage, kids....Sometimes the stress alone makes one unfit for duty.

That doesn't mean you need medication. It may mean you need a BREAK.

Seeking help doesn't mean you're put on anti-depressants that need to be reported.

Advice like your's discourages people from getting the help they need out of fear for their career.

Respond if you like, I won't be debating this.

Excargodog
04-24-2018, 12:18 PM
Not true. It likely needs to be reported on your FAA medical.

If a diagnosis of a grounding condition was made, you are responsible to ground yourself. Lack of medication does not equal lack of diagnosis,

Keep in mind any medical professional is going to take notes. You can open up a big can of worms as a pilot, typical mental health professional will make the diagnosis pretty quickly, toss you a bottle of prozac and tell you to come back in six months. At that point you're unemployed and facing a long road to get your medical back.

An "aviation savvy" medical provider can help talk you through some things and provide some lifestyle advice without being too quick on the draw with a grounding diagnosis. These problems exist on a spectrum, traditional providers will throw meds at even the lower end of the spectrum but that's not always necessary.


Now with all that said, if you're having serious trouble, get help immediately. Worry about flying later.


Correct across the board.
As for a non-aviation knowledgeable medical provider just putting you on Prizac and saying we'll re-evaluate in six months, you better believe it happens. Prozac and other antidepressants, as well as anxiolytics like Xanax get thrown around by some providers pretty freely. Look at all the opiate overdoses we have, many of whom were initially habituated through lax prescribing habits.


And seeing ANY medical provider, including a therapist, legally MUST be reported on your history under item 19, regardless of whether medication was prescribed. At that point it's up to the AME. With anxiety manifested directly due to flying, most of them would bump the decision to the Air Surgeon's office who would then send you here:

https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/avs/offices/aam/ame/guide/dec_cons/disease_prot/psycheval/

Now at about the 99% level, your ultimate diagnosis will eventually be decided as adjustment disorder, mild, resolving.

https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/mental-health-adjustment-disorder#1

And you will then be cleared back to flying, but as rickair notes, that's likely to be six months later, and likely after paying $5K for psychometric testing and consults that your insurance company will then deny because they were not strictly speaking MEDICALLY necessary.

And yeah, if this is really causing you problems that you are NOT getting over, go ahead and get it treated, because it is VERY treatable. But generally it does resolve without formal treatment, as it seems to be doing with you.

rickair7777
04-24-2018, 01:17 PM
Lots of really bad advice here, but I'm not gonna argue about it.

Look, everyone has problems. Some people have stresses in their life and need extra help. Money, deaths, marriage, kids....Sometimes the stress alone makes one unfit for duty.

That doesn't mean you need medication. It may mean you need a BREAK.

Seeking help doesn't mean you're put on anti-depressants that need to be reported.

Advice like your's discourages people from getting the help they need out of fear for their career.

Respond if you like, I won't be debating this.

"Bad" advice that might keep you out of jail.

The point I'm making is that you need to understand what is reportable, and what will get you into trouble. Non-aviation providers have no idea, and in the interest of being thorough (better safe than sorry), they can set you up for unnecessary FAA hassles or grounding.

The fact that it "happens to everybody" and maybe you just need a "break" does not change the fact that the FAA will ground you if reported, or refer you to DOJ for prosecution if you don't report something they think you should have. This particular issue is a hot-button, and was magnified by the germanwings thing.

I agree that many or most folks can manage it holistically, but you have to be careful if you get documented medical treatment. Again there is no confidentiality for pilots. I would advise do your own research and see if you can deal with it yourself. Lots of good info on the internet, and the FAA doesn't make you report what you google. But if it's bad, or not getting better, then get the help you need asap.

Glenntilton
04-24-2018, 01:26 PM
Has anyone here ever experienced anxiety or stress for no particular reason? Or a feeling of like ďwhat am I doing?Ē

Itís very discouraging and frustrating for me. Iím a commercial student with just over 150 hours and Iíve never had this issue until recently. I donít know why but I recently have been getting very anxious before flights. I did a XC Solo last week and the whole flight all I could think about was landing. My palms were sweating the whole flight too. For no reason. Or today, I was suppose to go flying but I flagged myself on the ďSĒ of the IMSAFE checklist, so I canceled.

This is all just very frustrating. I want this to go away so I can enjoy the rest of my commercial training.

This might have already been covered, but anxiety is a fact of life, especially while being evaluated.

As you gain experience, it goes away.

When I was an instructor, I knew of my students anxiety, and addressed it. Trying to help them relax.

TiredSoul
04-25-2018, 01:56 PM
As long as no medication is prescribed there is no real concern about visiting a therapist. People should feel free to seek the help they need.

Youíre missing my point.

Who knows nothing about aviation

kevbo
04-25-2018, 04:44 PM
Try some Benadryl or a shot of brandy after the run up.



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