Airline Pilot Forums

Airline Pilot Forums was designed to be a community where working airline pilots can share ideas and information about the aviation field. In the forum you will find information about major and regional airline carriers, career training, interview and job seeker help, finance, and living the airline pilot lifestyle.




50SeatsofGrey
05-01-2018, 07:33 AM
If there is anyone on here who went through law school "at night" while they flew for the airlines, or practices in some capacity while flying full time I would love to ask you a few questions if you don't mind. Please feel free to PM me.


Sputnik
05-01-2018, 08:27 AM
Sent you a PM

SactisbonesBJ
05-01-2018, 08:45 AM
Unless you go to a top ten law school (which you wont), you will NEVER make as much money in law than would at a major airline.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXRiOsvptww


rickair7777
05-01-2018, 11:41 AM
Unless you go to a top ten law school (which you wont), you will NEVER make as much money in law than would at a major airline.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXRiOsvptww

You could far exceed major airline pay if you end up a partner at a big firm (or start your own really successful firm). Those stats looked like W2, probably didn't account for partners/owners...and nobody in the class of 2103 is at that point yet.

But that's the top 1% (or less), and you won't be getting there by studying law part-time.

SonicFlyer
05-01-2018, 02:27 PM
The ABA only accredits schools that are full-time 3 year traditional AFAIK.

Which means that if you go to a local metropolitan type of law school that isn't ABA accredited you might be able to do it at night/part-time. But you'll likely only be able to practice in that one state since it isn't ABA accredited.

Nashville School of Law (http://www.nashvilleschooloflaw.net) is a great example of this... they are at night, most of their profs are not ivory tower types, they are real judges and practicing attorneys and as such can give a damn good practical education (as opposed to legal theory). But if you leave TN your law degree may not be recognized by other states.

And as mentioned above, if you are not in the top 10 you will never get in to a major prestigious firm as a partner. But who would want that life anyway? 80 hours a week slaving away? No thanks.


I seriously considered law school before deciding on flight school. Most lawyers make under $75k, and a few make well above that. But who wants to be indoors all day chained to a desk dealing with scumbags?


So the question is, why are you considering it? Is it a backup plan in case of furlough or medical? Is it just for fun or curiosity or cocktail party conversation? Is it a resume building plan? Is it a career change? Or do you really want to go full blast with it?

I put a lot of time and thought in to it before deciding not to do it, so I feel I might be able to offer some guidance to others who are considering a similar path.

jayme
05-01-2018, 03:07 PM
I did it online, but that only qualifies me to take the bar exam in California.

AC560
05-01-2018, 03:55 PM
The rules are designed to keep people in one state. Lawyers are like pilots they like to pull the ladder up behind them.

Do Federal Law ala immigration and you are good everywhere.

Tony Clifton
05-01-2018, 04:28 PM
I haven't formally studied law but I've watched "My Cousin Vinny" countless times while on layovers so...

TransWorld
05-01-2018, 06:03 PM
I haven't formally studied law but I've watched "My Cousin Vinny" countless times while on layovers so...

I stayed at a Holiday Inn last night. So, Homer Simpson and I will run the nuclear reactor.

jcountry
05-01-2018, 06:15 PM
Get to know some lawyers.

That will help you see whether it would be a good fit for you.

I knew several back in the day around the local airport. I could see that very few have the ‘gift.’ I knew I didn’t, and I chose to not fool with law school.

The vast majority of lawyers suck. Truly gifted ones get rich, but they are rare. As a guy with that gift once told me “I’m not the guy you want to go to for a 5 k divorce. I start at 50k.... For a reason.” He was amazing. He could walk into any room and have everyone laughing within 5 seconds. He truly was who you would want to hire for something critical.

If you’re that guy, you could do very well. But you should be honest with yourself first. Really think about whether it’s for you.

jtrain609
05-01-2018, 06:20 PM
If there is anyone on here who went through law school "at night" while they flew for the airlines, or practices in some capacity while flying full time I would love to ask you a few questions if you don't mind. Please feel free to PM me.


Did it, wouldn't recommend it.

Spicy McHaggis
05-01-2018, 08:18 PM
I haven't formally studied law but I've watched "My Cousin Vinny" countless times while on layovers so...



Apparently that movie has a reputation among lawyers as being a somewhat realistic representation of trial work.

Sounds like you’re ready to go!

NYC Pilot
05-01-2018, 11:32 PM
Stick to one career and do well in it. Chances are that you will fail having multiple plans. As previously mentioned, if you don't attend a top law school then it's a waste of time. Ofcourse, there are exceptions.

sailingfun
05-02-2018, 03:49 AM
I know several pilots who picked up law degrees on the side. I don’t know any who were able to incorporate that into a successful part time practice. People want to pick up the phone and talk to their attorney. They don’t want voicemail.

Bozo the pilot
05-02-2018, 05:07 AM
I haven't formally studied law but I've watched "My Cousin Vinny" countless times while on layovers so...

Ya beat me to it but I was going with "The Firm" :D
Well played sir.
I chose to study Psychology to understand the evil of Airline management.

FL370esq
05-02-2018, 06:09 AM
I did it....but it is a lot of work. There are many reputable (but not top 10/top tier) law schools that are ABA accredited programs which offer both full time and extended programs. Full time is a 3 year program and part is usually a 4 year with provisions to go longer if the situation dictates. The ABA, as part of its accredidation, requires mandatory attendance of at least 80% of each class which can be problematic unless you have some seniority.

If you want to make the big $$$, you need to go to a top tier school (Harvard, Yale, Penn, Michigan, Virginia, Duke, Stamford for example) and do well or a top of the second tier and be in the top 5%, be on law review and moot court and land a decent summer internship.

I make some decent beer money and boat gas money doing transactional work (real estate transfers, wills trusts, municipal practice) with a small firm and rarely enter a court room. It is a nice fall-back should a medical or furlough issue arise.

GogglesPisano
05-02-2018, 07:15 AM
"The surest cure for a love of the law is spend time with lawyers."

FL370esq
05-02-2018, 07:21 AM
"The surest cure for a love of the law is spend time with lawyers."

No truer words can be spoken. 😊

tomgoodman
05-02-2018, 07:38 AM
“Laws are like sausages, it is better not to see them being made.” :p

—Otto von Bismarck

calico
05-02-2018, 10:51 AM
I’ve been a layer for almost 20 years and making the jump to 121 soon. I wouldn’t recommend a law degree for many reasons; the ROI isn’t there anymore. Many large firms actually outsource to India. Feel free to PM me if you have specific questions.

rickair7777
05-02-2018, 11:17 AM
If you're looking for a side-job/backup plan, become a slum lord. No glamor but it works. Added advantage that if you start young, it will be paid off by the time you retire, providing it's own "pension" plus capital assets for your kids (or hookers or whatever).

FreshWater
05-02-2018, 02:36 PM
American Samoa Law School

snackysmores
05-02-2018, 03:20 PM
American Samoa Law School

Beat me to it

John Carr
05-02-2018, 07:26 PM
Better call Saul!!!!

That’s probably about the highest level you’ll attain.

Ambulance chasing and DWI washing.

filejw
05-03-2018, 09:51 AM
[QUOTE=rickair7777;2584835]If you're looking for a side-job/backup plan, become a slum lord. No glamor but it works. Added advantage that if you start young, it will be paid off by the time you retire, providing it's own "pension" plus capital assets for your kids (or hookers or whatever).[/QUOTE

In my experience ( 38 years ) the guys that did this became fairly well off . Can be hard work and your wife or partner need to be in on the operation. It helps to be able to be a bit harsh at times too. But it’s just business.

rickair7777
05-03-2018, 10:11 AM
In my experience ( 38 years ) the guys that did this became fairly well off . Can be hard work and your wife or partner need to be in on the operation. It helps to be able to be a bit harsh at times too. But it’s just business.

You're right, hard work. I eventually got sick of it and outsourced the management, which reduces my profit to beer money, but I'll own it free and clear around the time I retire.

I was being a bit facetious with "slum lord". My renter niche now is more young professionals. But you'll actually make more if you aim lower, solid lower class won't pay as much of course but they expect much less in the way of amenities, furnishings, etc. Give them a decent deal and keep the plumbing working and if they're the hard-working quiet type they'll often stay for a decade+ (annual turnover is typically going to cost you a month's rent... )

worstpilotever
05-05-2018, 07:12 PM
Call 1-800-MDC-OHEN. He will hook you up. Even has some high profile clients looking for an attorney.



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