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View Full Version : 😔 Cuban 737 Down at Havana


UAL T38 Phlyer
05-18-2018, 12:42 PM
Maybe a km past depature end...:(

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/havana-plane-crash-cuba-latest-updates-boeing-jose-marti-international-airport-a8358501.html


hindsight2020
05-26-2018, 01:17 PM
Here's an interesting clue.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBUKWtTJcaY

How the hell do you get a 737 to do that? Looks like a Vmc roll.

JohnBurke
05-26-2018, 01:53 PM
Here's an interesting clue.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBUKWtTJcaY

How the hell do you get a 737 to do that? Looks like a Vmc roll.

That interesting clue doesn't look much like a 737, nor like XA-UHZ, as it has winglets. XA-UHZ did not. The engines look a tad big to be -200 pipes, too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7JZdoS5uyNk


TheFly
05-28-2018, 03:55 AM
https://www.reddit.com/r/CatastrophicFailure/comments/8m3bcq/new_cctv_footage_of_cubana_flight_cu972_going/?utm_source=amp&utm_medium=comment_list

AirBear
05-28-2018, 08:43 AM
https://www.reddit.com/r/CatastrophicFailure/comments/8m3bcq/new_cctv_footage_of_cubana_flight_cu972_going/?utm_source=amp&utm_medium=comment_list

Appears to be in full stall, coming almost straight down, very little forward/rearward momentum.

rickair7777
05-28-2018, 02:52 PM
Here's an interesting clue.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBUKWtTJcaY

How the hell do you get a 737 to do that? Looks like a Vmc roll.


Good God. I've never seen airliner do that.

John Carr
05-28-2018, 04:17 PM
Good God. I've never seen airliner do that.

https://youtu.be/lksDISvCmNI

rickair7777
05-28-2018, 07:47 PM
https://youtu.be/lksDISvCmNI


That was a cargo plane, and the root cause was cargo.

UAL T38 Phlyer
05-29-2018, 02:43 AM
Good God. I've never seen airliner do that.

As J Burke posted, it seems to have winglets...and the accident aircraft was a -200.

I wonder why a security camera suddenly zoomed in on a spot where nothing was happening....and then nothing. No flare of light from a fire; no smoke.

I kinda think this is CGI.

wrxpilot
05-29-2018, 04:51 AM
As J Burke posted, it seems to have winglets...and the accident aircraft was a -200.

I wonder why a security camera suddenly zoomed in on a spot where nothing was happening....and then nothing. No flare of light from a fire; no smoke.

I kinda think this is CGI.

You know that video is taken from a cell phone recording a monitor replaying the footage right?

UAL T38 Phlyer
05-29-2018, 05:18 AM
No, I did not. That explains the zoom.

But I still donít know why it appears to have winglets.

WhiskeyDelta
05-29-2018, 07:59 AM
The winglets issue could be the curvature of the monitor the video is playing on. I think it distorted the wing tips just enough to make it look like it had winglets. I can make out enough of the engines to see they are the longer cowling from the -200.

Also, look at the time stamp. It jumps from 11:00 as the aircraft is falling to 16:06. That explains why there is no fireball in the video.

John Carr
05-29-2018, 08:45 AM
That was a cargo plane, and the root cause was cargo.

And yet parts of it looked similar....

And the root cause wasnít the cargo, it was a shift in the cargo.

rickair7777
05-29-2018, 09:07 AM
And yet parts of it looked similar....

And the root cause wasn’t the cargo, it was a shift in the cargo.


Yeah, that's what I was alluding to. But that wouldn't happen to a pax airplane unless all the people got up and ran to the back all at once. It would be really hard to load a 73 so it could take off but then not fly.

SonicFlyer
05-29-2018, 09:18 AM
Yeah, that's what I was alluding to. But that wouldn't happen to a pax airplane unless all the people got up and ran to the back all at once. It would be really hard to load a 73 so it could take off but then not fly.
Actually in the 74 incident it wasn't even the shifting of the cargo balance that brought it down, it was the fact that when the cargo shifted backwards it did so with enough force that it destroyed several hydraulic lines behind the aft pressure wall that controlled the elevator and thus the crew lost pitch control.

John Carr
05-29-2018, 09:24 AM
Actually in the 74 incident it wasn't even the shifting of the cargo balance that brought it down, it was the fact that when the cargo shifted backwards it did so with enough force that it destroyed several hydraulic lines behind the aft pressure wall that controlled the elevator and thus the crew lost pitch control.

And although slightly different things involved, could have been seen with a DC “back in the day” had there been cameras everywhere. I’m not talking about AA in ORD or UA SUX, completely different issue.

rickair7777
05-30-2018, 10:37 AM
Actually in the 74 incident it wasn't even the shifting of the cargo balance that brought it down, it was the fact that when the cargo shifted backwards it did so with enough force that it destroyed several hydraulic lines behind the aft pressure wall that controlled the elevator and thus the crew lost pitch control.


It actually destroyed the jackscrew. The initial investigation assumed the weight shift caused the crash, but they determined in the sim that it would have been recoverable, even with the degraded hydraulics. The cargo (a military vehicle) rolled back, through the aft bulkhead and took out the horizontal stabilizer jackscrew, I think that allowed the h. stab to float freely, which is typically not controllable. Same was that AS MD crash.

SonicFlyer
05-30-2018, 03:14 PM
It actually destroyed the jackscrew. The initial investigation assumed the weight shift caused the crash, but they determined in the sim that it would have been recoverable, even with the degraded hydraulics. The cargo (a military vehicle) rolled back, through the aft bulkhead and took out the horizontal stabilizer jackscrew, I think that allowed the h. stab to float freely, which is typically not controllable. Same was that AS MD crash.

Good point.

sourdough44
07-17-2018, 03:48 AM
On Jul 16th 2018 the airline released a 3 page press release stating, that cockpit voice and flight data recorders have been read out successfully. The investigation so far determined that the crew climbed the aircraft at too steep a pitch
angle (angle of attack) out of Havana leading to a stall and subsequent crash. The airline reasons that therefore the grounding of the airline as well as additional examinations imposed on the airline have no legal foundation, however, Mexico's DGCA have not responded to according requests by the airline. (Editorial note: according to ICAO rules only the investigation leader, Cuba's Accident Investigation Board, is permitted to talk about the progress of the investigation, participants in the investigation including the affected airline are not permitted to talk.

Some new info after the flight & data recorders were evaluated. Could be as simple as a stall caused by to high of a pitch on departure.

TheFly
11-19-2018, 07:20 AM
Any official statements on this crash? Black box, cvr, info?



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