Airline Pilot Forums

Airline Pilot Forums was designed to be a community where working airline pilots can share ideas and information about the aviation field. In the forum you will find information about major and regional airline carriers, career training, interview and job seeker help, finance, and living the airline pilot lifestyle.




210Av8r
05-30-2018, 05:44 PM
There are other threads in other forums from guys who are pondering a career change from <insert career here> into aviation. I'm in the same group, but wanted to ask the wisdom/advice from this group of current Compass pilots and relative new hires. A little background: I'm 47, have had a great (but not completely satisfying) career in engineering and have the vast majority of my TT in a 210 that I've owned since 2003. Family and finances are stable at this point, and I feel that now a good time as any if I am going to make the jump.

I decided to go ahead and submit my app to Compass 3 weeks ago but I havenít heard back from them. Iíd like to think that itís because Iím just not ripe enough yet. The only other reason I can think of, as disclosed in my app, is that I failed my private check ride in 1998 (had to repeat emergency decent and slip to landing). I would be more worried if that was the reason they havenít called me.

Based on research in this forum, I put Compass at the top of my list of candidates because (in order of importance to me):

1. Shorter reserve time.
2. All west coast bases = Ďeasierí commute from OAK or SMF.
3. Average total residence there for FO/CA is 3-4 years.
4. Upgrade soon after eligible.
5. All E175s.
6. ĎHigherí FO pay than most others (although not a huge difference)
7. Some of the guys on the forum make me laugh out loud with their posts.

For the same criteria, Horizon is on the list and so is SkyWest. I am concerned about QOL if I join SkyWest due to DTW/MSP junior basing and the new reserve rules that seem to be getting a lot of complaints on this forum. Reserve time would undoubtedly be longer.

I realize that I need to take things one step at a time. Iím up to 1385 TT, so hereís my planned sequence to become more ripe:

1. 1st class medical. Good health so no issues anticipated. Scheduled for June 18.
2. CAX written. Planned completion by June 15.
3. CAX ASEL training (in my 210).
4. CAX ASEL check ride (in my 210).
5. AMEL training (1.4 hours so far).
6. AMEL/CAX check ride.
7. Build min 25 hours AMEL.
8. Continue to fill in hours to get closer to ~1480 TT, including about 13 hours of night.

I am a freelance engineer so my schedule is VERY flexible, allowing for a great deal of focus of time and effort to become more ripe.

The point of some anxiety is the need to forecast the timing of the ramp down my engineering projects and feather into the FO job training. A CJO in the near future would sure make that planning easier, but I know I have to be patient.

Does my plan seem sound? At what point do you feel I'd be ripe and could have better hope of hearing from Compass? Please feel free to share your candid thoughts here or via PM.

Thanks a bunch!


Taco280AI
05-30-2018, 05:51 PM
Call them up, sometimes there's issues with companies seeing the apps

KelvinHelmholtz
05-30-2018, 05:54 PM
There are other threads in other forums from guys who are pondering a career change from <insert career here> into aviation. I'm in the same group, but wanted to ask the wisdom/advice from this group of current Compass pilots and relative new hires. A little background: I'm 47, have had a great (but not completely satisfying) career in engineering and have the vast majority of my TT in a 210 that I've owned since 2003. Family and finances are stable at this point, and I feel that now a good time as any if I am going to make the jump.

I decided to go ahead and submit my app to Compass 3 weeks ago but I havenít heard back from them. Iíd like to think that itís because Iím just not ripe enough yet. The only other reason I can think of, as disclosed in my app, is that I failed my private check ride in 1998 (had to repeat emergency decent and slip to landing). I would be more worried if that was the reason they havenít called me.

Based on research in this forum, I put Compass at the top of my list of candidates because (in order of importance to me):

1. Shorter reserve time.
2. All west coast bases = Ďeasierí commute from OAK or SMF.
3. Average total residence there for FO/CA is 3-4 years.
4. Upgrade soon after eligible.
5. All E175s.
6. ĎHigherí FO pay than most others (although not a huge difference)
7. Some of the guys on the forum make me laugh out loud with their posts.

For the same criteria, Horizon is on the list and so is SkyWest. I am concerned about QOL if I join SkyWest due to DTW/MSP junior basing and the new reserve rules that seem to be getting a lot of complaints on this forum. Reserve time would undoubtedly be longer.

I realize that I need to take things one step at a time. Iím up to 1385 TT, so hereís my planned sequence to become more ripe:

1. 1st class medical. Good health so no issues anticipated. Scheduled for June 18.
2. CAX written. Planned completion by June 15.
3. CAX ASEL training (in my 210).
4. CAX ASEL check ride (in my 210).
5. AMEL training (1.4 hours so far).
6. AMEL/CAX check ride.
7. Build min 25 hours AMEL.
8. Continue to fill in hours to get closer to ~1480 TT, including about 13 hours of night.

I am a freelance engineer so my schedule is VERY flexible, allowing for a great deal of focus of time and effort to become more ripe.

The point of some anxiety is the need to forecast the timing of the ramp down my engineering projects and feather into the FO job training. A CJO in the near future would sure make that planning easier, but I know I have to be patient.

Does my plan seem sound? At what point do you feel I'd be ripe and could have better hope of hearing from Compass? Please feel free to share your candid thoughts here or via PM.

Thanks a bunch!

You arenít even a commercial pilot and you wonder why you arenít hearing back? You still have 2 checkrides to go before you would even be eligible

On a side note pilots with your background (all GA without any actual job experience) tend to struggle in airline training. Thereís at least one regional that has completely stopped hiring people with that sort of background


my6FOh
05-30-2018, 06:14 PM
There are other threads in other forums from guys who are pondering a career change from <insert career here> into aviation. I'm in the same group, but wanted to ask the wisdom/advice from this group of current Compass pilots and relative new hires. A little background: I'm 47, have had a great (but not completely satisfying) career in engineering and have the vast majority of my TT in a 210 that I've owned since 2003. Family and finances are stable at this point, and I feel that now a good time as any if I am going to make the jump.

I decided to go ahead and submit my app to Compass 3 weeks ago but I havenít heard back from them. Iíd like to think that itís because Iím just not ripe enough yet. The only other reason I can think of, as disclosed in my app, is that I failed my private check ride in 1998 (had to repeat emergency decent and slip to landing). I would be more worried if that was the reason they havenít called me.

Based on research in this forum, I put Compass at the top of my list of candidates because (in order of importance to me):

1. Shorter reserve time.
2. All west coast bases = Ďeasierí commute from OAK or SMF.
3. Average total residence there for FO/CA is 3-4 years.
4. Upgrade soon after eligible.
5. All E175s.
6. ĎHigherí FO pay than most others (although not a huge difference)
7. Some of the guys on the forum make me laugh out loud with their posts.

For the same criteria, Horizon is on the list and so is SkyWest. I am concerned about QOL if I join SkyWest due to DTW/MSP junior basing and the new reserve rules that seem to be getting a lot of complaints on this forum. Reserve time would undoubtedly be longer.

I realize that I need to take things one step at a time. Iím up to 1385 TT, so hereís my planned sequence to become more ripe:

1. 1st class medical. Good health so no issues anticipated. Scheduled for June 18.
2. CAX written. Planned completion by June 15.
3. CAX ASEL training (in my 210).
4. CAX ASEL check ride (in my 210).
5. AMEL training (1.4 hours so far).
6. AMEL/CAX check ride.
7. Build min 25 hours AMEL.
8. Continue to fill in hours to get closer to ~1480 TT, including about 13 hours of night.

I am a freelance engineer so my schedule is VERY flexible, allowing for a great deal of focus of time and effort to become more ripe.

The point of some anxiety is the need to forecast the timing of the ramp down my engineering projects and feather into the FO job training. A CJO in the near future would sure make that planning easier, but I know I have to be patient.

Does my plan seem sound? At what point do you feel I'd be ripe and could have better hope of hearing from Compass? Please feel free to share your candid thoughts here or via PM.

Thanks a bunch!
Your application will not be visible in the system because you do not posses a 1st class medical and are a private pilot. Once you possess the required certificates and your application reflects it your application will become visible.

BobbyLeeSwagger
05-30-2018, 07:04 PM
You arenít even a commercial pilot and you wonder why you arenít hearing back? You still have 2 checkrides to go before you would even be eligible

On a side note pilots with your background (all GA without any actual job experience) tend to struggle in airline training. Thereís at least one regional that has completely stopped hiring people with that sort of background

Lol, so he'll do some chandelles in his airplane hes flown for 15 yrs. I think he'll manage. The better CPL training would be to just sit and talk in the 210 for 3 hrs with another pilot, occasionally eating snacks and going to the bathroom, laughing about PAs on gaurd and exchanging tips about getting on at the majors.


Anyway


Best wishes to you sir, hope you can make the jump. Not sure how much instrument flying you've done, but that would be something to focus on. I recommend the DA42 for your multi. Its crazy expensive but has a flight director and vnav, and of course its glass, so it's good exposure. If your from the bay area I know a guy that flies them a lot, know him for 10 yrs. Just PM me. I have a lot of respect for engineer-pilots. You'll do just fine if you put the work in, but you know that. Good plan, hope to see you here.

-Swag

210Av8r
05-30-2018, 07:29 PM
Lol, so he'll do some chandelles in his airplane hes flown for 15 yrs. I think he'll manage. The better CPL training would be to just sit and talk in the 210 for 3 hrs with another pilot, occasionally eating snacks and going to the bathroom, laughing about PAs on gaurd and exchanging tips about getting on at the majors.


Anyway


Best wishes to you sir, hope you can make the jump. Not sure how much instrument flying you've done, but that would be something to focus on. I recommend the DA42 for your multi. Its crazy expensive but has a flight director and vnav, and of course its glass, so it's good exposure. If your from the bay area I know a guy that flies them a lot, know him for 10 yrs. Just PM me. I have a lot of respect for engineer-pilots. You'll do just fine if you put the work in, but you know that. Good plan, hope to see you here.

-Swag
...ah ha...one of the guys from #7 on my top list! I am near the Bay Area (Stockton) so I'll send you a PM.

Regarding IFR...because I don't have an autopilot in my 210, I cancel when a flight would involve more than a fair amount of hard IFR flying. I just don't tangle with turbulence in IMC because that's no fun to hand fly for so long. Despite that, I still file IFR 98%+ of the time just because I enjoy being in the system. I've maintained instrument currency and proficiency continuously since owning the 210 so I feel reasonably comfortable in that arena.

I appreciate the advice from all perspectives and will continue plugging along!

los5041
05-31-2018, 07:31 AM
Get your instrument, commercial and 1st class medical knocked out and I have little doubt you will receive a call shortly thereafter. Plenty of people going through training right now with very little actual instrument flying due to flying on the west coast most of their previous flying careers. If you have been staying current then that is what is most important. I agree with what was mentioned above about getting some Flight Director/Glass experience, even if it's a few hours. The instrument flying you are used to (assuming needle flying) is pretty much useless at this level until you're in the terminal environment. Instrument flying in these aircraft is telling a computer (Flight Management System) what you want to fly and making sure that you are in the correct Flight Director mode to allow the plane to fly it. If you can get that Flight Director experience you will be slightly ahead of many people currently going through training. I don't think your failure from Private Pilot is any sort of disqualifier, at least not in today's demand. I don't recommend failing your INST/COMM when you do take them, as that won't look very good and could prevent you from getting the call. There are a few other options out there too if you want to get some more experience. I've got a buddy flying with Boutique Air and they use the same Flight Management System as we do. Either way, go and get those tickets put on your license and update your application. Until you have those, I wouldn't expect a call. Good luck.

bradthepilot
05-31-2018, 09:26 AM
I wouldn't bother with the commercial single engine. Do your commercial multi; you can always get a single engine add-on later if you want.

Terrain
05-31-2018, 04:56 PM
Just graduated from the schoolhouse and Iíve watched trainees struggle with the FMS and automation (autopilot and the VNAV function and how it all ties in with the FMS).

If you can find a way to get training on an FMS, and learn to fly via autopilot, youíll boost the likelihood of success in the 121 world.

Good luck!

PositveRate
06-03-2018, 06:53 PM
Just graduated from the schoolhouse and Iíve watched trainees struggle with the FMS and automation (autopilot and the VNAV function and how it all ties in with the FMS).

If you can find a way to get training on an FMS, and learn to fly via autopilot, youíll boost the likelihood of success in the 121 world.

Good luck!

I heard Flight Simulator 2004-what ever the present version is, helps. If you want to go that route.

210Av8r
06-03-2018, 07:37 PM
I heard Flight Simulator 2004-what ever the present version is, helps. If you want to go that route.

I had the same thought and plan to check it out. Don't want to take any short cut that jeopardizes the value but if it works and I can save a few bucks.... :)

VIRotate
06-04-2018, 02:08 AM
You'll learn VNAV on the line. It should be more incorporated into training, but it is what it is. You'll be comfortable with it by the end of IOE and you'll pick up a few tips and tricks from other pilots along the way. Don't be afraid to ask questions even after OE. We are a very friendly pilot group after all!

210Av8r
06-04-2018, 04:38 AM
You'll learn VNAV on the line. It should be more incorporated into training, but it is what it is. You'll be comfortable with it by the end of IOE and you'll pick up a few tips and tricks from other pilots along the way. Don't be afraid to ask questions even after OE. We are a very friendly pilot group after all!

Looking forward to the day when I can play on the team rather than just read about it from the sidelines. Patience....

mustang304
06-04-2018, 05:49 AM
First of all- Congrats on changing careers. I did it a few years back (Engineering to Pilot), and it is straightforward. The water is fine here, the pay is low, but will eventually catch up. (FWIW- I'm in my late 40s as well, and did the switch-- with no issues).


You do need your CMEL, and as people have said here, just go straight to commercial- no need to do private level. Add on the CSEL down the road. Once you have that and roughly 25 hours multi you'll be very marketable. Also, make sure you have the other ATP min requirements (night flight, etc). This is the right time to do this, there is substantial movement coming in the next few years.


As for the folks saying that engineers can't adapt to the airline world-- they are 100% wrong. I'm not sure what your background in engineering is, but the FMS programming and VNAV are really not that difficult, and your engineering degree indicates that you can approach the learning in a systematic way. If you have experience in programming or using software, I think you will have no problem managing the systems. The only difficult part in general is the large amount of information to process in short order- the "drinking from the fire hose". This can be mitigated pretty easily by being proactive in your studying and staying ahead of the workload.


Please feel free to PM me- I can tell you more if you like and what to expect.



Mustang304

210Av8r
06-04-2018, 03:20 PM
First of all- Congrats on changing careers. I did it a few years back (Engineering to Pilot), and it is straightforward. The water is fine here, the pay is low, but will eventually catch up. (FWIW- I'm in my late 40s as well, and did the switch-- with no issues).


You do need your CMEL, and as people have said here, just go straight to commercial- no need to do private level. Add on the CSEL down the road. Once you have that and roughly 25 hours multi you'll be very marketable. Also, make sure you have the other ATP min requirements (night flight, etc). This is the right time to do this, there is substantial movement coming in the next few years.


As for the folks saying that engineers can't adapt to the airline world-- they are 100% wrong. I'm not sure what your background in engineering is, but the FMS programming and VNAV are really not that difficult, and your engineering degree indicates that you can approach the learning in a systematic way. If you have experience in programming or using software, I think you will have no problem managing the systems. The only difficult part in general is the large amount of information to process in short order- the "drinking from the fire hose". This can be mitigated pretty easily by being proactive in your studying and staying ahead of the workload.


Please feel free to PM me- I can tell you more if you like and what to expect.



Mustang304
Thanks for the good advice. I do feel that, as engineers, our brains are less likely to atrophy than some other professions as our careers move along. I'm a freelance factory automation engineer, so designing (and subsequently staring at) complicated control screens and understanding systems is part of the gig. In any case, I'm looking forward to the challenge of a lot of new learning. Just please tell me that my days of doing laplace transforms ended and died during my engineering education. Some things I definitely don't miss.

Flyinlynn
06-05-2018, 10:37 PM
On a side note pilots with your background (all GA without any actual job experience) tend to struggle in airline training. Thereís at least one regional that has completely stopped hiring people with that sort of background

Would you know which regional?

I am in that category of GA pilots learned part 61 for all ratings with no glass experience. CFI and CFII. I left my career of many years to fly.

1600 hours 50 Multi etc...

mpet
06-06-2018, 04:33 AM
Would you know which regional?

I am in that category of GA pilots learned part 61 for all ratings with no glass experience. CFI and CFII. I left my career of many years to fly.

1600 hours 50 Multi etc...
Endeavorrr

BobbyLeeSwagger
08-15-2018, 08:50 AM
You arenít even a commercial pilot and you wonder why you arenít hearing back? You still have 2 checkrides to go before you would even be eligible

On a side note pilots with your background (all GA without any actual job experience) tend to struggle in airline training. Thereís at least one regional that has completely stopped hiring people with that sort of background

I like how 210av8r got a job offer 10 weeks from this post hating on him lol

Thats gangsta

Excargodog
08-15-2018, 09:08 AM
I like how 210av8r got a job offer 10 weeks from this post hating on him lol

Thats gangsta

210av8r got the call?

That's great. Assuming a Stockton boy can survive a Minneapolis winter.....

BobbyLeeSwagger
08-15-2018, 09:33 AM
210av8r got the call?

That's great. Assuming a Stockton boy can survive a Minneapolis winter.....

He got a TSA call, but still.

As for mini.. I remember rolling up to our gate at night in the winter and all the rampers had ski masks, and call me whatever, but I was like.. "what is going on here?!?! Did we just rob a bank??" Then I did my walk around... I came back in the jet bridge coughing and wheezing talking trash saying how I couldn't wait to get back to cali, lol. I was like genuinely ****ed haha. The gate agent was like what's this dudes problem and kinda chuckled.

My norcal lungs couldn't handle it

210Av8r
08-15-2018, 10:51 AM
I like how 210av8r got a job offer 10 weeks from this post hating on him lol

Thats gangsta

Thanks for the kudos! Yep, I have been hustling to meet the qualifications - and have been enjoying every minute of it.

Flying around the SMF area a lot, always get a tingly feeling in my stomach when I hear a CPZ on freq.

KelvinHelmholtz
08-15-2018, 04:02 PM
I like how 210av8r got a job offer 10 weeks from this post hating on him lol

Thats gangsta

I wasnít hating, just giving practical advice. Iíll stand by the point of my original post in saying that people with his experience often donít do well in airline training compared to those with actual professional flight experience.

BobbyLeeSwagger
08-15-2018, 04:23 PM
You arenít even a commercial pilot and you wonder why you arenít hearing back? You still have 2 checkrides to go before you would even be eligible

On a side note pilots with your background (all GA without any actual job experience) tend to struggle in airline training. Thereís at least one regional that has completely stopped hiring people with that sort of background

What part of this was advice, exactly? Asking for a friend..

Excargodog
08-15-2018, 04:28 PM
Don't. :D :D

BobbyLeeSwagger
08-15-2018, 04:40 PM
https://i.imgflip.com/2fycko.jpg

Taco280AI
08-16-2018, 08:48 AM
............

thejetpilot
08-20-2018, 10:14 AM
Out of curiosity, why do they call mgmt "hulas"? lol

Motoxer66
08-20-2018, 10:22 AM
Out of curiosity, why do they call mgmt "hulas"? lol


Hulas Kanodia is the chairman of the board over at TSH

thejetpilot
08-20-2018, 10:27 AM
Hulas Kanodia is the chairman of the board over at TSH

Oh ok! I thought it had something to do with hoops or skirts! lol

FlytheSky
08-20-2018, 11:49 AM
Oh ok! I thought it had something to do with hoops or skirts! lol

That's the term used when the Hawaiian flow was in the works to keep morale up. Now that it's DOA, we can all brain dump it. :D

brocklee9000
08-23-2018, 07:18 PM
Hulas Kanodia is the chairman of the board over at TSH

I got a recruitment thing in the mail for TSA and the tail number of the E145 in the picture ended in HK. It all makes sense now haha.

thejetpilot
08-23-2018, 08:15 PM
Hulas Kanodia is the chairman of the board over at TSH

Speaking of Trans States, is that why a lot of tail numbers end in HK, those being his initials?

Paid2fly
08-23-2018, 08:38 PM
Speaking of Trans States, is that why a lot of tail numbers end in HK, those being his initials?







Ya think?


:confused:


:eek:


:rolleyes:

thejetpilot
08-23-2018, 11:22 PM
Ya think?


:confused:


:eek:


:rolleyes:

Hey Iím new to this!

Excargodog
08-24-2018, 06:25 AM
Hey Iím new to this!

I thought it was Heckler & Koch myself at first.

VIRotate
08-24-2018, 03:00 PM
I thought it was Heckler & Koch myself at first.

Youíre a man of great taste.



Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1