Airline Pilot Forums

Airline Pilot Forums was designed to be a community where working airline pilots can share ideas and information about the aviation field. In the forum you will find information about major and regional airline carriers, career training, interview and job seeker help, finance, and living the airline pilot lifestyle.




View Full Version : HSV1 Herpetic Simplex Keratitis


fallininreverse
06-09-2018, 10:09 PM
I've been diagnosed with Herpetic Simplex Keratitis in my right eye, Would it make me unfit to take my medical 1 test? My eye reaches 6/9 with correction (eye with herpes), and with both eyes, I can see normally. Although, I'm still worried if I would be unfit to pass the test.


SonicFlyer
06-10-2018, 09:04 AM
Google for FAA disqualifying conditions and you'll see a list.

rickair7777
06-11-2018, 02:23 PM
Google for FAA disqualifying conditions and you'll see a list.

Probably not that simple.

For vision, they are usually more interested in BCVA rather than the underlying condition (unless it can progress rapidly or unpredictably).

In this case, if one eye is 20/20, and you can also see 20/20 with both eyes it should not be a problem to get a 1C with a waiver (they are pretty common for weak vision in one eye, in fact there are airline pilots flying with only one eye).

But ask your AME, he knows best.

I'm talking about the US and the FAA, I'm not familiar with other country's rules.


Excargodog
06-11-2018, 09:06 PM
Probably not that simple.

For vision, they are usually more interested in BCVA rather than the underlying condition (unless it can progress rapidly or unpredictably).

In this case, if one eye is 20/20, and you can also see 20/20 with both eyes it should not be a problem to get a 1C with a waiver (they are pretty common for weak vision in one eye, in fact there are airline pilots flying with only one eye).

But ask your AME, he knows best.

I'm talking about the US and the FAA, I'm not familiar with other country's rules.

6/9 is the metric equivalent of a Snellen 20/30. That doesn't meet class 1 standards but it is easily within the range where waivers are given.

Herpes simplex keratitis of that degree is usually controllable by topical medication (eye drops) so if promptly diagnosed and treated it doesn't interfere with flying duties. Not all airlines will accept people with less than 20/20 vision bilaterally though, despite waivers, although the bias against those people is more theoretical than objective.

rickair7777
06-12-2018, 06:26 AM
Not all airlines will accept people with less than 20/20 vision bilaterally though, despite waivers, although the bias against those people is more theoretical than objective.

That is becoming more rare. Most just photocopy your 1C, or give you a 1C exam to verify that you meet the FAA standards. I suppose a few might be able to get away with filtering for conditions which the FAA has granted a waiver for, although that's risky for the employer these days.

Excargodog
06-12-2018, 01:42 PM
That is becoming more rare. Most just photocopy your 1C, or give you a 1C exam to verify that you meet the FAA standards. I suppose a few might be able to get away with filtering for conditions which the FAA has granted a waiver for, although that's risky for the employer these days.

Totally agree. Back in the 60s, UAL had its own medical department - according to my grandfather - who would do an annual flight physical on pilots. The reason was that the pilots underground all knew the AMEs that were 'pilot friendly' which was defined as being willing to pass you if you had a pulse, regular or not, and wanted an honest broker. I believe that went away in UAL budget cuts though. But particularly in the absence of airline medical departments, HR depts trying to make medical decisions or standards more restrictive than that of the federal air surgeon would probably be legally disastrous for them.

Twin Wasp
06-12-2018, 04:49 PM
When the ADA was passed in 1990 airlines were left to explain why they could deny a job to an applicant who met the government standard for the job. Delta used to require 20/20 uncorrected. The FAA says only that your vision must be correctable to 20/20. A 20/70 person could sue for job discrimination as long as their vision was correctable to 20/20.

Excargodog
06-12-2018, 08:45 PM
When the ADA was passed in 1990 airlines were left to explain why they could deny a job to an applicant who met the government standard for the job. Delta used to require 20/20 uncorrected. The FAA says only that your vision must be correctable to 20/20. A 20/70 person could sue for job discrimination as long as their vision was correctable to 20/20.

The issue here though is someone NOT correctable to 20/20, but potentially with a statement of demonstrated ability for flying with one eye 20/20 and the other 20/30.

On their jobs page American Airlines still lists as a qualification:


Distance vision corrected to 20/20 and near vision corrected to 20/40 or better in each eye

In ADDITION to:

Valid First Class medical certificate

https://aa.pilotcredentials.com/index.php?a=qualifications

Whether that additional medical requirement would be defensible under the ADA is a very good question, the difficulty being someone would have to PROVE they didn't get the job because of their SODA.

I doubt the selection committee would be stupid enough to admit that was the case and the applicant would instead simply be given the TBNT letter everyone else gets who for whatever reason simply wasn't selected.

Inevitably though,American will get such applicants through the wholly owned flow programs though,and at that point I think they will back down and just accept any of those with a valid first class medical.

SonicFlyer
06-12-2018, 09:37 PM
I wonder how many pilots flowing through to AA from the WO regionals don't meet their qualifications? :confused:

Twin Wasp
06-13-2018, 05:40 AM
I was going with the thread drift about airlines having their own medical exams.

Excargodog
06-13-2018, 06:25 AM
I was going with the thread drift about airlines having their own medical exams.

Well, in this case AmericanAirlines has established their own medical REQUIREMENT, above and beyond that required (and arguably permitted) by law. Whether they actually do testing on their applicants or not, and whether they would actually defend the medical standard stated on their requirements page or not, I have no idea. They would appear to be in really tenuous legal grounds under the ADA were they to choose to do so. But just having the requirement posted must certainly deter many people who cannot meet that standard. The problem, of course, is for a candidate to be able to demonstrate that they were NOT selected BECAUSE they did not meet that standard, though I suppose a lawsuit (perhaps even a class action lawsuit) could be initiated by ATPs otherwise qualified claiming they were being discriminated against and opening the who,e selection process up to discovery. The simple threat of doing that alone might make American reconsider their policy of second-guessing the federal air surgeon on medical matters.

rickair7777
06-13-2018, 10:00 AM
Well, in this case AmericanAirlines has established their own medical REQUIREMENT, above and beyond that required (and arguably permitted) by law. Whether they actually do testing on their applicants or not, and whether they would actually defend the medical standard stated on their requirements page or not, I have no idea. They would appear to be in really tenuous legal grounds under the ADA were they to choose to do so. But just having the requirement posted must certainly deter many people who cannot meet that standard. The problem, of course, is for a candidate to be able to demonstrate that they were NOT selected BECAUSE they did not meet that standard, though I suppose a lawsuit (perhaps even a class action lawsuit) could be initiated by ATPs otherwise qualified claiming they were being discriminated against and opening the who,e selection process up to discovery. The simple threat of doing that alone might make American reconsider their policy of second-guessing the federal air surgeon on medical matters.

I'm pretty sure the airlines won a court case affirming that the ADA does NOT apply to normal corrective lenses, on the basis that having to wear glasses does not interfere with "normal daily living", so is not a disability. Bizarre.

Twin Wasp
06-13-2018, 02:33 PM
I can't quote your quotes but 20/20 distant and 20/40 near are the 67.103 requirements for a first class medical.

Excargodog
06-13-2018, 05:26 PM
I can't quote your quotes but 20/20 distant and 20/40 near are the 67.103 requirements for a first class medical.


Anything can be SODA'd. Well, almost anything. We have one-eyed pilots flying and I guarantee you they have neither 20/20 distant nor 20/40 near vision in their missing eye.




Application Process for Medical Certification

Exam Techniques and Criteria for Qualification
Items 31-34. Eye - Monocular Vision

An applicant will be considered monocular when there is only one eye or when the best corrected distant visual acuity in the poorer eye is no better than 20/200. An individual with one eye, or effective visual acuity equivalent to monocular, may be considered for medical certification, any class, through the special issuance section of part 67 (14 CFR 67.401 (http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=a6d0b06e341bb4b9419233314c6a4aca&rgn=div8&view=text&node=14:2.0.1.1.5.5.1.1&idno=14)).
In amblyopia ex anopsia, the visual acuity loss is simply recorded in
Item 50 (https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/avs/offices/aam/ame/guide/app_process/exam_tech/item50/) of FAA Form 8500-8, and visual standards are applied as usual. If the standards are not met, a Report of Eye Evaluation, FAA Form 8500-7 (https://www.faa.gov/forms/index.cfm/go/document.information/documentID/185784), should be submitted for consideration.
Although it has been repeatedly demonstrated that binocular vision is not a prerequisite for flying, some aspects of depth perception, either by stereopsis or by monocular cues, are necessary. It takes time for the monocular airman to develop the techniques to interpret the monocular cues that substitute for stereopsis; such as, the interposition of objects, convergence, geometrical perspective, distribution of light and shade, size of known objects, aerial perspective, and motion parallax.
The REQUIREMENTS are for routine approval at the AME level. You would be amazed what can be approved by the federal air surgeon. SODAs for one eye not meeting 20/20 visual acuity standards due to amblyopia ex anopsia - the most common cause of one eye being uncorrectible - are not rare.

rickair7777
06-13-2018, 07:58 PM
I can't quote your quotes but 20/20 distant and 20/40 near are the 67.103 requirements for a first class medical.

Waiverable. Many (but not all) things are waiverable.



Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1