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View Full Version : EMS Flying Career/Jobs


newpilotusa
07-05-2018, 06:08 PM
Hello Everyone,

First, before I get into the meat of what I'm wondering, I want to say that I've pretty much set my mind on going the EMS track versus going to the airlines. Most of you probably do not care about that decision but I wanted to get that out there. I'm very much aware of the airlines and the lucrative pay rates, retirement plans (major carrier DC plans), and potential high quality of life that they can provide and the massive amount of retirements that are forthcoming to these companies.

However, after conducting research, I think I'll really like the EMS world. Some of the schedules that I've seen (7 on, 7 off) are very nice and you can practically be home every night. You can also fly anything (depending on company) from a Pilatus to a King Air to a Learjet. Not to mention the high level of satisfaction from helping people who could be critically injured and taking them to a place where they can receive medical treatment. I fully comprehend the fact that pay is low (in comparison to the airlines) and I am okay with that. I've seen salaries from $65k to $120k.

With all of this being said, what I'm wondering is if anybody knows of any EMS companies that have fixed wing aircraft and any pilot info on them such as pay and schedules, I'd be very grateful for any info you may have.

Also, if anyone has info or reviews for the following companies on pilot life, that'd be extra appreciated:
-Mayo Clinic (they created a flight dept and have one King Air and four helicopters)
-Air Methods
-Aero Air
-AirMed
-Sanford Health

Thank you in advance to anyone who responds!


El Pilot
07-05-2018, 06:33 PM
I have no EMS flying experience but I also find it interesting. I'm currently going to start flying 135 freight and gain some turbine experience. Most of those outfits prefer freight or prior 135 turbine time. Best of luck and I'll be watching this thread for other replies too.

deadstick35
07-05-2018, 06:50 PM
Not to mention the high level of satisfaction from helping people who could be critically injured and taking them to a place where they can receive medical treatment.

Get that out of your head. Itís passenger on-demand 135. There are no exceptions to the FARs or anything else. Nobody is going to give you a cape and mask. Although some uniforms are...interesting...I usually got asked if I worked for a NASCAR team.

The market is saturated with RW assets and those companies usually run FW, too. If the RW side gets hit with new regulations, like losing the inclusion in Deregulation, the entire industry will fell it. Also, youíll hear a lot about the practices, such as they canít NOT fly a patient, or the billing (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-06-11/private-equity-backed-air-ambulances-leave-behind-massive-bills). Itíll get maddening when patients are discharged before the crew gets back to the base.

You have to find a way to address the boredom. Youíll probably fly less than 200 hrs per year, but youíll sit at the base for 12 hrs/day for the hitch. Thatís still about 2000 hrs per year youíre sitting.

Itís a good retirement gig, if youíre ready to retire.


newpilotusa
07-05-2018, 07:45 PM
Get that out of your head. Itís passenger on-demand 135. There are no exceptions to the FARs or anything else. Nobody is going to give you a cape and mask. Although some uniforms are...interesting...I usually got asked if I worked for a NASCAR team.

The market is saturated with RW assets and those companies usually run FW, too. If the RW side gets hit with new regulations, like losing the inclusion in Deregulation, the entire industry will fell it. Also, youíll hear a lot about the practices, such as they canít NOT fly a patient, or the billing (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-06-11/private-equity-backed-air-ambulances-leave-behind-massive-bills). Itíll get maddening when patients are discharged before the crew gets back to the base.

You have to find a way to address the boredom. Youíll probably fly less than 200 hrs per year, but youíll sit at the base for 12 hrs/day for the hitch. Thatís still about 2000 hrs per year youíre sitting.

Itís a good retirement gig, if youíre ready to retire.
First, thank you for taking the time to respond. Even though your message was predominantly negative, I'm thankful that you wrote a detailed summary of the industry.

Secondly, I completely understand that this job isn't perfect. No job is. Hell even when I jumpseated on FedEx once, the pilots *****ed galore about working at FedEx and then they talked about how life sucked because pretty soon, Cargo aircraft are soon going to be single pilot configured and many people are gonna lose there jobs. I've also heard similar negative statements from pilots at United, Alaska, and UPS. I understand that these examples are not necessarily an apples to apples comparison however there is some correlation.

I've been told that the days can be long and filled with boredom because of the standard 12 hour shifts being on call, however that part doesn't necessarily bother me.

Ultimately, there are personal reasons why I would prefer to fly EMS. Although the personal reasons aren't the main factors as to why I want to go the EMS route, they are a contributing factor. I don't prefer to speak these reasons online and I know that they shouldn't get in the way of my professional career however, I think this would be a great career in the end.

Just out of question, where did you work, what did you fly, and what was your life/schedule like? If you would not like to post it publicly, would you please possibly PM me?

Thank you again!

Boris Badenov
07-06-2018, 05:16 AM
Like the other guy said, excellent retirement gig. The truth is that while you ought not think of it in terms of wearing a cape, etc, it *is* a lot more rewarding than carrying a bunch of rich people and their golf bags around. It's ok to consider this as long as you don't get a hero complex about doing the job. You're an ambulance driver, not Captain America.

The thing that would concern me about doing it long term (if you're a young guy, which it sounds like you are) is job stability. As the previous poster intimated, the RW side is wildly oversaturated. At some point the bubble is going to burst on that, and what the effects will be on the FW side will be are pretty much impossible to discern. Almost certainly not good.

deadstick35
07-06-2018, 08:25 AM
The intent wasnít to be overly negative, but to cast off the rose-colored glasses and bring some reality to the discussion. Itís one of the best gigs in aviation IF 1) you live at your base, 2) you have good mx support and management, and 3) you are truly immune to/isolated from factors that could (even unintentionally) influence your go/no go decision. The PIC should NEVER end a shift with more patients than s/he starts with. IOW, donít make ďpatientsĒ out of yourself or your medcrew. When I was flyig a community-based program, weíd get the pick up location and patient weight. If the patient is below 50kg, well, thatís a kid. It might be in the back of your mind, but thereís no avoiding that. You have to know for WB and fuel planning.

As Boris wrote it can be rewarding, but youíre probably batting well below .500 when compared to the unnecesssry transfers. Also, you have to be the diplomat and keep the peace, but also stand firm as the PIC. 14 hrs is 14 hrs and no you canít fudge the times because your planning tells you the ETA will put you over. Mins are mins. Skirting around the rules ó THATíS how EMS aviation got a bad rep like the 1980ís freight dogs.

At a good place, youíll get in more trouble for accepting a flight that you shouldnít have than you would for turning down a flight. Youíre paid to use your wealth of professional experience and knowledge to assess the information and make decisions. It can tear you up when that 10 kg pt couldnít be transported because the weather was not cooperating. You canít move clouds or fog. You as the PIC have to make that call, stand by it, and live with it.

MadmanX2
07-06-2018, 11:17 AM
Although some uniforms are...interesting...I usually got asked if I worked for a NASCAR team.


You have to find a way to address the boredom. Youíll probably fly less than 200 hrs per year, but youíll sit at the base for 12 hrs/day for the hitch. Thatís still about 2000 hrs per year youíre sitting.



I was usually asked if I was there to fix the toilet. Yes, the one piece onsie makes the pilot look like a plumber assistant to the point that I put "Earl's Plumbing" on the back of my, for lack of better words, "flight suit".

The companies I worked for had a house near the airport to stay in while on duty and had a 15 minute to 1 hour limit to be at the airport after you get called. So I always had time to run errands, go shopping, work on my old truck, watch a movie or take a nap.

One company I worked for, I lived 4 minutes away from the airport. I spent minimal time at the airport. In fact, sometimes I would go to the airport because I was bored at home.

Air ambulance is not really glorious work, but for me it is satisfying. I enjoy flying at night and going to small rural airports. I enjoy getting the call and trying to guess where I will be going. I used to fly for a small airline and I flew around 1100 hours per year. I got to the point where I hated flying. In the last air ambulance company I worked for, I flew an average of 30 hours a month. Just enough to keep flying fun for me.

Last place I worked for was 14 on, 14 off. And when I had been there a few years, I had 4 weeks vacation time per year. That meant I could have my scheduled 14 off, take 14 days vacation, then come back to my 14 scheduled off. Usually I would take 7 vacation days and get 21 days off twice a year, then cash in the other 14 days of vacation. I got enough time off that I got a side business going. I had time to work on that on my off time and a lot while I was on duty.

It isn't a job for time building, but air ambulance flying has been good to me. Lots of places are short qualified pilots. Usually the company requires 2500 hours with 500 hours twin or turbine time. Also ATP required. Some companies utilize a right seater. Hiring times can be as low as 500 hours, and when company minimums are met then some companies assist in getting the ATP.

Also the variety in equipment is great. twin or single engine turbo props, or jets. Take your pick. Some companies do short flights, under 2 hours and some companies go world wide. A friend of mine flew for a company that went world wide. No telling where he would go to when the phone rang. Those flights are usually not on demand, but are bidded on by companies for a certain date.

As I said, air ambulance flying has been rewarding and satisfying to me. I did all FW flying.

tlove482
07-07-2018, 04:48 PM
Hello Everyone,

First, before I get into the meat of what I'm wondering, I want to say that I've pretty much set my mind on going the EMS track versus going to the airlines. Most of you probably do not care about that decision but I wanted to get that out there. I'm very much aware of the airlines and the lucrative pay rates, retirement plans (major carrier DC plans), and potential high quality of life that they can provide and the massive amount of retirements that are forthcoming to these companies.

However, after conducting research, I think I'll really like the EMS world. Some of the schedules that I've seen (7 on, 7 off) are very nice and you can practically be home every night. You can also fly anything (depending on company) from a Pilatus to a King Air to a Learjet. Not to mention the high level of satisfaction from helping people who could be critically injured and taking them to a place where they can receive medical treatment. I fully comprehend the fact that pay is low (in comparison to the airlines) and I am okay with that. I've seen salaries from $65k to $120k.

With all of this being said, what I'm wondering is if anybody knows of any EMS companies that have fixed wing aircraft and any pilot info on them such as pay and schedules, I'd be very grateful for any info you may have.

Also, if anyone has info or reviews for the following companies on pilot life, that'd be extra appreciated:
-Mayo Clinic (they created a flight dept and have one King Air and four helicopters)
-Air Methods
-Aero Air
-AirMed
-Sanford Health

Thank you in advance to anyone who responds!EagleMed is always hiring. Starting play was about 60k but you'll end up making about 70k after training and travel pay. Plus, they give hiring and retention bonuses. They won't guarantee you'll be home every night though. You'll end up timing out before getting back to base sometimes.

Sent from my BTV-W09 using Tapatalk

Lostinthesky
07-08-2018, 04:46 AM
I work FW for air methods and its a pretty great gig overall. The main thing (for me anyway) is the QOL, if you live where youre based you life is pretty good. And like the airlines, if you have to commute very far, it can get pretty old pretty fast.
We have a million bases(PC12 and King Air), and i can really only speak to mine, so:
Starting base pay is pretty avg, 65ish, but you can make significantly more working extra shifts ($550 day), plus holiday pay, etc. I made mid 90s my first year.
We do 7on 7off. 12 hr shifts. Based at the airport
Maintenance and equipment are excellent.
Its a huge company (1300 ish pilots, 300 aircraft) so theres a lot of red tape, but for the most part management stays out of your way.
No pressure to take flights. No repercussions for declining. We have a union.
401k. Medical benefits are average. Several diff plans, all paid by employee.
Fly maybe 200 hrs/year.
Im very happy here overall

imthecaptainnow
07-08-2018, 02:51 PM
What is your current experience for flying right now? Some of those ems operators are looking for at least 2000TT to start out.

Das Auto
07-09-2018, 07:55 AM
If you happen to live in the small time where you're based you could make the argument that it's a better QOL choice than some other options, especially with the 7 on 7 off. You will have more time at home than most pilots.

Companies that fly with 2 pilots are probably a better choice in my opinion. You could get tired pretty quick with back to back night flights and an extra set of eyes is deffinately safer.

The whole helping people thing wore off after a few months for me. After a while you tend to get a little desensitized but the kids still get to you. Especially if you have your own.

Good for you for thinking outside the box though. Not everyone is destined for Delta.

AbramF
07-15-2018, 06:34 AM
I have been flying Air Ambulance for about six months. Previously, I flew my own plane to support my business and was a contract pilot doing all Part 91 flights for a few different clients. I wanted a bit more flying without as many overnights, so I thought that Air Ambulance might be a good option.

I also really liked the idea of the mission that Air Ambulance flying provided. From that standpoint, I was not disappointed. About fifty percent of my trips have been organ transplants, which sometimes involve just the organs but also may involve moving med teams to a location and waiting for them to return with an organ. I have also had some pretty amazing and unforgettable experiences with passengers.

I find the flying very gratifying and I really like the ability to help people at a critical time.

The negative part for me is that almost all of the flying happens on the back side of the clock, between 10 pm and 8 am. Coupled with the fact that I have a day job, that gets really exhausting.

In addition, I used to really enjoy exploring the destinations that I went to on my corporate trips. Now, I almost never leave the airport and spend most of my ground time trying to catch a couple of hours of sleep. The last negative is that the pay is low and it is difficult for me to justify setting aside two weeks a month for that level of pay. I find myself turning down lucrative contract jobs to be on call for much less money.

I decided that I still want to do some of the Air Ambulance trips, but it wasn't the right solution for me. As a result, I stayed on as contract pilot for the company, but also pick up some additional contract work.

So far that seems to be a pretty good mix of flying and life balance for me.

Abram Finkelstein
N48KY

flyingagain
07-22-2018, 08:05 PM
The negative part for me is that almost all of the flying happens on the back side of the clock, between 10 pm and 8 am. Coupled with the fact that I have a day job, that gets really exhausting.

Abram Finkelstein
N48KY

Sounds like an accident waiting to happen. I've been in the air ambo world and wouldn't want to see anyone working a day job after they've been up most of the night. You need to pick which career to pursue. Your "job" when you're in rest during the day is try to get some sleep, not work a day job. You owe it to your medic, flight nurse, and pax to get some rest.

xcop
07-22-2018, 11:13 PM
Sounds like an accident waiting to happen. I've been in the air ambo world and wouldn't want to see anyone working a day job after they've been up most of the night. You need to pick which career to pursue. Your "job" when you're in rest during the day is try to get some sleep, not work a day job. You owe it to your medic, flight nurse, and pax to get some rest.

I did that for about 10 years, before I was able to retire from the job I hated but, needed. I then was able to get the job I wanted. You do what you have to do. But, I’m sure he appreciates your judgmental advice.:)

deadstick35
07-23-2018, 02:32 AM
I did that for about 10 years, before I was able to retire from the job I hated but, needed. I then was able to get the job I wanted. You do what you have to do. But, Iím sure he appreciates your judgmental advice.:)

None of the major EMS operators would hire somebody now who does this. If the base lead knows and doesnít say anything, that person would be fired, too. The risk is too great. Iíve done plenty of all nighters. I canít imagine doing that, going to a ďday jobĒ and then reporting back to work. EMS is getting away from the wild Wild West of 1980s night freight ďdo whatever to get the job done.Ē Too many people have died.

USMCFLYR
07-23-2018, 03:42 AM
I did that for about 10 years, before I was able to retire from the job I hated but, needed. I then was able to get the job I wanted. You do what you have to do. But, Iím sure he appreciates your judgmental advice.:)

If he is violating the rest rules then I is good judgmental.

If he knows he is fatigued, and Iím not yet walking about just one tiring night here, but chronically fatigued due to the competing day job then he isnít doing himself, or the people for whom he is responsible and favors.

deadstick35
07-23-2018, 03:46 AM
If he is violating the rest rules then I is good judgmental.

If he knows he is fatigued, and Iím not yet walking about just one tiring night here, but chronically fatigued due to the competing day job then he isnít doing himself, or the people for whom he is responsible and favors.

Weíre our own worst judge when it comes to that, though.

Fleet Warp
07-23-2018, 04:47 AM
I flew Air Ambulance, based near atlanta for 6 months.

It was a rewarding, interesting, and fun job. The crazy hours (circadian swaps and long days) sucked. Still I liked it. BUT the terrible maintenance on the ancient and poorly maintained Lear 35 (more emergencies and daily random failures then you could possibly imagine, a completely unreliable autopilot, and a toxic maintenance culture) were enough to make me run away at the first available chance.

deadstick35
07-23-2018, 05:02 AM
I flew Air Ambulance, based near atlanta for 6 months. I took it knowing that it would be difficult, only because I got hired DEC and planned to get 1000 PIC and move on.

It was a rewarding, interesting, and fun job but the crazy ass hours (circadian swaps and long days) sucked. Still I loved it, but the terrible maintenance on the ancient and poorly maintained Lear 35 (more emergencies and daily failures then you could possibly imagine, and a toxic maintenance culture) were enough to make me take a pay cut to go back to a safer and secure regional, long before building 1000 hours.

Did that company have a King Air 200 and (at one time) a Lear 25?

Fleet Warp
07-23-2018, 05:11 AM
Did that company have a King Air 200 and (at one time) a Lear 25?

I think so actually. M A A

deadstick35
07-23-2018, 05:57 AM
I think so actually. M A A


A neighbor got transported in the 25 awhile ago. The plane RONd for an early departure. Everybody was at the airport ready, but the battery was dead. The crew should have caught this before the the patient left the hospital. Instead, they had to go back and wait as the 200 flew a battery and mechanic from GA.

Thatís the kind of place that wouldnít have a problem hiring a pilot with another full-time job. I friend looked at that place a few years ago. He said the pay was the same as what he made flying 35s in the 80s.

JohnBurke
07-23-2018, 11:01 AM
I flew medevac, ambulance, administrative transport, and organ recovery with four different operations in everything from light piston twins to turboprops to turbojets, dirt runways to busy international airports. Good, bad, and some really ugly.

It's illegal to discriminate as an ambulance carrier, but I've seen a lot of it. I've seen quite a few operators who will ask for the patient insurance information, then go unavailable if they don't like it, or who will defer to another operator and pawn a risk off on someone else. I carried a lot of pawned-off patients at one operation, because we refused to operate dishonestly, and we got stiffed on payment about half the time. But we got called, because the hospitals and clinics knew we'd respond regardless of who needed the lift.

I hauled hearts, kidneys, livers, bone, blood and all kinds of pieces and parts, doctors and recovery teams, and patients. I had gunshot victims, burn victims, highly contagious communicable diseases, cancer patients, and once a victim with a fresh chainsaw to the face. I've done a lot of weather flying to remote, uncontrolled airports, most often at night, most often in mountainous terrain, often single pilot.

Realize that it's a 135 operation. Whatever good feeling you think you'll have, and the hero-implications of saving the day, the bottom line is that you're there to make safety of flight decisions applicable to any 135 flight operation, and you'll never make them based on the patient's interest. Only on what's safe. You'll let the medical crew worry about the patient, and frankly, I never followed up to see who lived or died, or how the patient fared, because my function was to fly them, and make safe decisions. You won't rush because the patient is urgent. You won't push weather or night, and you'll turn down critical organ recovery flights when the weather meant it was unsafe or illegal, just like I have. You won't put yourself, your aircraft, your crew, or the patient at risk because you want to save the day, or feel urged to do something you shouldn't because it's a medical emergency. It's not an emergency. It's your job.

You'll spend a lot of time sitting, waiting. A lot of time. You'll confront the fact that the pay isn't that great, that the job doesn't lend itself to longevity, and that ambulance operations tend to last a while and turn into something else. There are a lot of shady ones out there. Lifers and long timers doing that work are often there because they couldn't get on elsewhere. Or it's a stepping stone.

Some of the flights will stick with you. One night I picked up a young man who'd had a snowboarding mishap. His neck was broken. During the initial treatment for the broken neck, a tumor was discovered; the reason the neck was weakened, and the patient learned he was terminal. I flew him from the ski resort to a hospital on the other side of the range. It stuck with me; he was a young man being taken somewhere to die. My next patient was a young boy, terminal cancer. That one stuck with me. Haunted me. I never follow up, but I didn't have to. The next patient was a transport, several states away. Another cancer case, terminal, flying him home to die. We carried some family. In the end we didn't get paid, but those three bothered me.

None of them bothered me so much as the 8 year old boy I picked up one night. I was in a movie when the call came. He was deceased, they needed an extra pilot to move him. Native, he had to be interred before sunrise. It was a full moon, and when I looked over my shoulder I saw a body bag on the sled, only it was an adult bag half-full because of his tiny body. He'd drowned, playing in a pool. That one haunted me for years, and I can still see that bag clearly, though it was decades ago.

I was given an administrative patient to move, no nurse. He sat in the front right seat, and somewhere, in the middle of nowhere with just he and I at dusk, collapsed and had a heart attack in my cockpit. Another quiet lady sat in the right seat, administrative flight, no nurse, and only after I landed did I learn she was a suicide. On another flight, the patient collapsed while driving a big rig, and the rural hospital couldn't identify the cause. I transported him, and after the flight was approached and told he had a very contagious condition. I was given shots and antibiotics and medications that turned my skin orange, burned. On another run, a multi-casualty incident, the patient was crashing when the bus backed up to the airplane. I could see blood on the windows, and some squiring on the windows. The door flew open, the head medic was screaming for supplies, which I was handing out of the airplane because the volunteer ambulance was running out. Then they ran out of hands, and I was gloves on and in the ambulance working on the patient, too. That particular one didn't make it.

Toss aside whatever romantic ideas you have about ambulance work and look at it from a practical perspective. I don't regret the medical flying I've done. I'd do it again. It's not a career, and ambulance companies and corporations don't treat it like one or pay like one. In some cases, it's a racket. In other cases, the medical personnel rule the show, and you do NOT want flight decisions being made by non-pilot nurses and medics. Don't tell them how to do their job, but don't let them dictate yours, and don't work for companies in which the management on down are medical personnel. Regardless of their qualifications in back, you are always the final say on the operation of that flight, and don't work for a place that tries to pressure you otherwise.

Don't run. Walk.

Be willing to say "no." It's the most powerful tool you have.

Pick up a good hobby in your spare time. I suggest building an airplane. You'll have time. If not, read. A lot.

It can't be understated enough. You're not there to save the patient, but to drive the airplane, and you're alone. You will often be working on the wrong side of the clock. Don't rush. Speed kills. People put too much emphasis on the "e" in ems. You have medics. You provide the service. The patient provides the emergency, but don't make it yours.

Das Auto
07-23-2018, 05:28 PM
QUOTE/ In other cases, the medical personnel rule the show, and you do NOT want flight decisions being made by non-pilot nurses and medics. Don't tell them how to do their job, but don't let them dictate yours.[/QUOTE]

Couldn't agree more with this statement. Turbulence is always the pilots fault LOL!

flyingagain
07-25-2018, 05:41 PM
I did that for about 10 years, before I was able to retire from the job I hated but, needed. I then was able to get the job I wanted. You do what you have to do. But, Iím sure he appreciates your judgmental advice.:)

It's not advice. It's the effing truth. He ain't Superman. Nobody should be flying all nighters then going to a day job.
I know two guys who were killed doing fixed wing Medevac and a few others in rotors. It's a job to be taken seriously. I'm not implying that the guys I knew were fatigued. But someone working a day job will be.

MadmanX2
07-28-2018, 10:43 AM
The negative part for me is that almost all of the flying happens on the back side of the clock, between 10 pm and 8 am. Coupled with the fact that I have a day job, that gets really exhausting.



At my company a pilot can work another job, as long as that job is on the bottom of the priority list and does not interfere with rest. If the other job is affecting the flying job, then that person gets called in and has to make a choice on which job is more important. That decision will have to be made before walking out of the office.

There are a couple pilots that own their own business and flies for us. But they can be absentee owners so no problem with flying.

I have known pilots that have flown air ambulance for 30 years. It is a career.

I know one pilot that started when air ambulance was done in a C-206 or C-210 carrying the patient and the Dr. He tells me stories of going into Mexico and having to bribe officials to take the patient out of the country.

JohnBurke
07-30-2018, 12:26 AM
He tells me stories of going into Mexico and having to bribe officials to take the patient out of the country.

I don't think I've ever flown into mexico, except on a 121 flight, when I didn't have to buy "insurance" with no receipt or paperwork and pay off people. Everything from a gentle suggestion to a gentleman with an MP-5 jammed in my ribs.

I write mexico with lower case. It's not high on my to-visit list and doesn't merit a capital letter.

Some damn good food there, though.

AbramF
08-07-2018, 04:11 PM
At my company a pilot can work another job, as long as that job is on the bottom of the priority list and does not interfere with rest. If the other job is affecting the flying job, then that person gets called in and has to make a choice on which job is more important. That decision will have to be made before walking out of the office.

There are a couple pilots that own their own business and flies for us. But they can be absentee owners so no problem with flying.


I havenít been on the site in a while and was surprised to see the response. I honestly had no idea that I had made such a controversial statement and appreciate the feedback.

For the record, I own my own company and have the luxury of adjusting my schedule do get proper rest on days that I am available. However, I am cognizant that most of the comments on here were made in good faith.