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View Full Version : Bachelors for ATP


FlyinSolo
08-03-2018, 07:41 PM
First post here, so hello everyone!
I'm Quinn, I am 20, and I currently work at an FBO at KRFD
I started my job about 10 months ago now and it has really sparked my interest in aviation! I have my 3rd class medical scheduled for next week and I am trying to pursue flying as a career. I am seeing that in order to fly for a regional airline I am going to need my ATP, which requires a bachelors degree. I wanted to know if anyone had any input on whether or not it could be an online degree or not. I am currently considering an online degree in Music Production through Full Sail University online, it says that it can be completed in as little as 20 months and that is quite appealing. With my job I have the opportunity to make small talk with tons of pilots and I was having a conversation yesterday with a corporate pilot talking about my plan and he told me to get my ATP as soon as I could, and that "the degree could be in basket weaving, it really doesn't matter as long as you have it"


JamesNoBrakes
08-03-2018, 07:59 PM
First post here, so hello everyone!
I'm Quinn, I am 20, and I currently work at an FBO at KRFD
I started my job about 10 months ago now and it has really sparked my interest in aviation! I have my 3rd class medical scheduled for next week and I am trying to pursue flying as a career. I am seeing that in order to fly for a regional airline I am going to need my ATP, which requires a bachelors degree. I wanted to know if anyone had any input on whether or not it could be an online degree or not. I am currently considering an online degree in Music Production through Full Sail University online, it says that it can be completed in as little as 20 months and that is quite appealing. With my job I have the opportunity to make small talk with tons of pilots and I was having a conversation yesterday with a corporate pilot talking about my plan and he told me to get my ATP as soon as I could, and that "the degree could be in basket weaving, it really doesn't matter as long as you have it"
An ATP does not require a degree.

Airlines generally want a degree, yes, an online degree is fine. No, they don't care what it is in.

Anyone convincing you to get something really fast probably wants your money. Work your way through your certificates and ratings, even if it takes 5 years, it's far better than starting off in a bunch of debt.

zondaracer
08-03-2018, 08:16 PM
Also, you donít need a degree to fly for the regionals. Eventually, you will probably want to get a bachelor degree to be competitive for the majors.


Excargodog
08-03-2018, 10:04 PM
The degree is generally called a Bachelor of Arts in Native American Textiles.

FlyinSolo
08-04-2018, 12:14 AM
Also, you donít need a degree to fly for the regionals. Eventually, you will probably want to get a bachelor degree to be competitive for the majors.
I meant majors but I appreciate the input

FlyinSolo
08-04-2018, 12:15 AM
The degree is generally called a Bachelor of Arts in Native American Textiles.
I was just going based off of what their website said
"Whether you're a play-by-ear musician with a passion to compose, or an active songwriter ready to market your work, Full Sail's Music Production bachelor of science degree program provides the tools and knowledge you'll need to pursue your dream."

FlyinSolo
08-04-2018, 12:18 AM
An ATP does not require a degree.

Airlines generally want a degree, yes, an online degree is fine. No, they don't care what it is in.

Anyone convincing you to get something really fast probably wants your money. Work your way through your certificates and ratings, even if it takes 5 years, it's far better than starting off in a bunch of debt.
I am going to be flying with a local flying club to accumulate hours as opposed to a flight school for now, thanks!

Otterbox
08-04-2018, 06:20 AM
I was just going based off of what their website said
"Whether you're a play-by-ear musician with a passion to compose, or an active songwriter ready to market your work, Full Sail's Music Production bachelor of science degree program provides the tools and knowledge you'll need to pursue your dream."

I have a buddy who flies jets with a theather degree and another with a music degree... youíll be fine.

kspilot
08-04-2018, 11:08 AM
My advice is use StraighterLine and WGU. Knock out a bachelors for a couple thousand bucks in as little time as possible. Spend the savings on a cheap airplane. Exchange hours on the plane for dual if you can find a CFI thatís interested. The less debt the better, this industry turns on a dime.

journeylover
08-05-2018, 12:17 PM
I'm a mom of a future pilot and we just finished researching an economical plan for my son to get there. He is 20 in Sept. and is making the following choice: community college for first 2 years (very cheap, just finished his first year there and is living at home) and transferring for 2 years to finish online at a university (we're in FL and there are several universities like UCF or UF with good online Bachelor's; he is going for History). The total for all 4 years will be about $20K plus books. Since we are saving $ going this route (no room/board), we are going to pay for pilot training at our local airport flight school, about the most economical path we could find. It will take about a year of training (3-4 days a week), plus 1-2 years working CFI hours to meet requirements (our estimate). So he will get his Bachelor's in 3 years, about the same time as he will earn his hours needed for a Regional job. I have a friend whose son goes to Full Sail. Pros: an online degree in 29 mo. Cons: not regionally accredited so credits don't usually transfer to another school if you don't finish, plus very pricey ($50K+ right?). My advice, since you have a job, would be find the lowest online Bachelor's degree you can get (WGU might work like someone suggested, I am not familiar with it) and pay cash for it or get Financial Aid if you can. Save your borrowing power for loans for flight training, unless you have parents paying for it.

sonnycrockett
08-05-2018, 12:31 PM
I'm a mom of a future pilot and we just finished researching an economical plan for my son to get there. He is 20 in Sept. and is making the following choice: community college for first 2 years (very cheap, just finished his first year there and is living at home) and transferring for 2 years to finish online at a university (we're in FL and there are several universities like UCF or UF with good online Bachelor's; he is going for History). The total for all 4 years will be about $20K plus books. Since we are saving $ going this route (no room/board), we are going to pay for pilot training at our local airport flight school, about the most economical path we could find. It will take about a year of training (3-4 days a week), plus 1-2 years working CFI hours to meet requirements (our estimate). So he will get his Bachelor's in 3 years, about the same time as he will earn his hours needed for a Regional job. I have a friend whose son goes to Full Sail. Pros: an online degree in 29 mo. Cons: not regionally accredited so credits don't usually transfer to another school if you don't finish, plus very pricey ($50K+ right?). My advice, since you have a job, would be find the lowest online Bachelor's degree you can get (WGU might work like someone suggested, I am not familiar with it) and pay cash for it or get Financial Aid if you can. Save your borrowing power for loans for flight training, unless you have parents paying for it.


HI "Mom"....you are doing well for your son, sounds like a sound plan. The object is to get as much Education and Flight time in the earliest possible timeline. Seniority is everything and the goal is a Major Airline position. Keep debt to a minimum--living at home is great as well as local flight schools, skip Humpty Diddle and the other schools that offer a "Fast Track" to high debt!

JohnBurke
08-05-2018, 05:17 PM
Full Sail has some respect if you're looking for a job as a screen writer (but it's the screen writing that's of interest, not where you went to school). As a pilot, a non-regionally accredited facility won't be recognized as a legitimate four year degree.

At the initial stages of one's career, a degree is superfluous. It's irrelevant, and without meaning.

If you choose certain corporate paths or a major airline route, which will take a number of years, a four year degree will be required at the upper levels by some operators (major airline, some corporate). Otherwise, one can begin and end one's career over a lifetime without a degree, and make a very good living doing it. I would suggest getting the degree regardless of the direction.

I would not suggest an aviation degree unless you're already well established in the career, doing it online, and it will get you through the degree quicker. Otherwise, focus on a degree that you can use outside aviation. An aviation degree means nothing to anyone inside aviation or out; only the fact that it's a degree.

Don't feel rushed by those mewling at alter of seniority. Most of them have never been through a furlough, downsizing, merger, bankruptcy, or any of the other things that typically befall an aviation career, and despite the pie-in-the-sky optimism that the employment boom will last forever, it will not. Reality will set in soon enough, and many of those who sold their souls for a little seniority will find themselves unqualified to go anywhere else when the music stops and no chairs remain. There aren't as many chairs as some seem to think, and there will be a lot left standing.

Plan accordingly.

Subieguy14
08-06-2018, 06:39 AM
Highly suggest getting your FIRST class medical before you start to make sure you are even eligible for the airlines.


Online doesn't matter. Most do online and it works very well.


My route was go to ATP, get my ratings ASAP, build my hours, and then get my online degree while building hours since you don't need one until you get to the majors.


Also, you can use your FAA licenses (commercial, single, multi, instrument, ATP) towards Aviation degrees at verious colleges such as UVU, ERAU, ASU, etc etc which sort of saves a little bit of money and time.


just my thoughts.

rickair7777
08-06-2018, 08:41 AM
I'm a mom of a future pilot and we just finished researching an economical plan for my son to get there. He is 20 in Sept. and is making the following choice: community college for first 2 years (very cheap, just finished his first year there and is living at home) and transferring for 2 years to finish online at a university (we're in FL and there are several universities like UCF or UF with good online Bachelor's; he is going for History). The total for all 4 years will be about $20K plus books. Since we are saving $ going this route (no room/board), we are going to pay for pilot training at our local airport flight school, about the most economical path we could find. It will take about a year of training (3-4 days a week), plus 1-2 years working CFI hours to meet requirements (our estimate). So he will get his Bachelor's in 3 years, about the same time as he will earn his hours needed for a Regional job. I have a friend whose son goes to Full Sail. Pros: an online degree in 29 mo. Cons: not regionally accredited so credits don't usually transfer to another school if you don't finish, plus very pricey ($50K+ right?). My advice, since you have a job, would be find the lowest online Bachelor's degree you can get (WGU might work like someone suggested, I am not familiar with it) and pay cash for it or get Financial Aid if you can. Save your borrowing power for loans for flight training, unless you have parents paying for it.

This sounds reasonable.



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