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View Full Version : SWA Pilots healthcare


Cldsfr79
08-12-2018, 12:11 PM
I’m going to be starting next month and I just want to get ahead on health insurance info.

If someone can provide me the healthcare insurance provider and what the premium and basic monthly costs and deductibles such as for meds, doctor visits, treatment, etc. It will be two adults on the plan. If this is sensitive info, can you private message me.

Thank you.


e6bpilot
08-12-2018, 12:36 PM
This is a year old. Add about 10 percent to the costs. Open enrollment starts in November and the plans will probably go up again.
What this doesn’t discuss in detail is the $0 premium “Regular Plan”. It is a grandfathered plan so it doesn’t cover preventive, but unless you have 12 kids, your preventive costs will be way lower than the premiums. It covers 80/20 until you go $2500 out of pocket and then it covers everything 100 percent. Many pilots use the Regular Plan, me included. Dental, vision, and some life Is included.

https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/swapa/assets/pdf/Benefits/SWAPA_Benefits_Guide.pdf?mtime=1447098897

Cldsfr79
08-12-2018, 03:26 PM
This is a year old. Add about 10 percent to the costs. Open enrollment starts in November and the plans will probably go up again.
What this doesn’t discuss in detail is the $0 premium “Regular Plan”. It is a grandfathered plan so it doesn’t cover preventive, but unless you have 12 kids, your preventive costs will be way lower than the premiums. It covers 80/20 until you go $2500 out of pocket and then it covers everything 100 percent. Many pilots use the Regular Plan, me included. Dental, vision, and some life Is included.

https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/swapa/assets/pdf/Benefits/SWAPA_Benefits_Guide.pdf?mtime=1447098897

Awesome!thank you very much for the info!


swaforme
08-12-2018, 07:59 PM
X10 on the regular plan. Best deal going.

Skyward
08-12-2018, 08:06 PM
Yep, the Regular Plan is awesome. I was skeptical at first because my wife has a lot of medical issues. I researched it a lot and decided to go with it, and it still seems too good to be true. It’s United Healthcare and covers everything we’ve needed with $0 premium.

at6d
08-12-2018, 09:15 PM
Another regular plan supporter here.

ZapBrannigan
08-12-2018, 11:57 PM
Regular plan here too. Although I’m considering the HSA this year if proceeds can be put towards long term care in the future. Might as well start saving for Del Boca Vista.


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Proximity
08-13-2018, 06:00 AM
HSA can make sense if those on the plan have the need for preventative care but are otherwise healthy. Southwest gives you $750 towards the HSA and you can earn another $250 for you and your spouse pretty easily (couple mouse clicks every week and a 15 minute screening). HSA funds go in pre tax and aren't taxed on the way out, plus grow tax free. That's better then any other retirement going, so I pay any medical expense using after tax dollars, never touching my HSA money.

However, if we ever start needing lots of medical care, I'm enrolling in the RP.

Smooth at FL450
08-13-2018, 06:14 AM
RP here too, and we're pregnant with our first. don't let all the "does not cover..." literature the company puts on on the RP fool you. There's a reason they don't pump this plan up. The only reason we would consider changing plans is if our child is on the autism spectrum, which is not covered by the plan.

saab2000
08-16-2018, 01:22 AM
I use the HSA. Premiums are just $13/month for me as a single guy. I got a thorough physical and some age-appropriate testing done (I'm 51) and paid nearly nothing.

The money I save into the plan is my money to be used for qualified expenses, of which I have had none yet. It is tax-advantaged savings and capped at $3400 for me annually plus the company's contribution. It is obviously higher for a couple.

This is not the same as the Flexible Spending Account or whatever it is called, where the money must be used or it is lost. The HSA money is yours and can be invested or kept in the account.

I'm saving it for medical expenses in retirement.

I'm not dissing the Regular Plan but at least research HSA plans to be educated on their benefits and negatives, which I think are very few.

e6bpilot
08-16-2018, 07:01 AM
I use the HSA. Premiums are just $13/month for me as a single guy. I got a thorough physical and some age-appropriate testing done (I'm 51) and paid nearly nothing.



The money I save into the plan is my money to be used for qualified expenses, of which I have had none yet. It is tax-advantaged savings and capped at $3400 for me annually plus the company's contribution. It is obviously higher for a couple.



This is not the same as the Flexible Spending Account or whatever it is called, where the money must be used or it is lost. The HSA money is yours and can be invested or kept in the account.



I'm saving it for medical expenses in retirement.



I'm not dissing the Regular Plan but at least research HSA plans to be educated on their benefits and negatives, which I think are very few.



Agree. In your situation, HSA is probably the better option. If you have kids or use health care a lot, I would say the RP is probably the best option unless you rely on one of the few things it does not cover that the choice plans do.
I have tricare and decided to use the RP as a well researched experiment this year. It has been really good overall since the two insurances complement themselves nicely. The only annoying thing for us has been using Optum RX for maintenance med refills. It is a real pain and is not as seamless as it should be.
We blew through our out of pocket max (covered by tricare) in the first 5 months and SWA has picked up everything 100 percent since that happened. All we have paid this year is our family deductible of 300.

flyguy81
08-16-2018, 07:59 AM
Been on the RP since I was hired.

No premiums. Low deductible. Low max out of pocket.

You can afford a ton of preventative care by saving on all that. Get shots at the local health clinic for cheap/free. Pay for kids yearly at the cash price. Anything else shop around like you would when buying something expensive.

HSA has a $1500/$3000 deductible with a max out of pocket of $6000/$12000. $13/$33mo premiums for single/family.

Choice plans have lower deductibles/max OOP but you pay significantly more in premiums.

Regular Plan costs you nothing. You lose preventative but that’s easily fixed by doing homework. $200/$300 deductible and max out of pocket of $2500.

If you won’t use it at all, the HSA might make most sense since you’re out the least but bank company money. With kids and me getting hurt every year doing mountain sports the RP is excellent.

CaptYoda
09-06-2018, 11:41 AM
What about prescription coverage on the RP? In particular does anyone have experience with coverage for ADHD meds (for a teenager), as they can be quite pricey.

at6d
09-06-2018, 01:42 PM
It’s fine but some meds must be ordered via mail service.

e6bpilot
09-06-2018, 03:12 PM
3 fills at the pharmacy of your choice for any single medication and then it is a maintenance medication and must be filled in 90 day increments by OptumRx. Generics are free. Everything else is 80/20.
Optum is a pain to get started, but once it is going, it’s easy.
I am the family “administrator” for our health plans, and I probably spend an hour every month or so calling and faxing stuff. It is worth it for the savings and choices, though.



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