Airline Pilot Forums

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miguelito2
08-14-2018, 07:04 PM
I'm considering becoming a pilot and I have a few questions about what it is like to be a pilot. I am from the United States, but I speak spanish fluently and would like to be a pilot in Colombia. Do Colombian airlines hire foreigners? What is the pay like in Colombia? How do the schedules compare to the major carriers in the United States?


NEDude
08-14-2018, 09:47 PM
I'm considering becoming a pilot and I have a few questions about what it is like to be a pilot. I am from the United States, but I speak spanish fluently and would like to be a pilot in Colombia. Do Colombian airlines hire foreigners? What is the pay like in Colombia? How do the schedules compare to the major carriers in the United States?

Don't know about flying the line, but Avianca is looking for A320 instructors for a minimum 6 month contract, but extendable indefinitely, based in Bogata. A Brit friend of mine just got offered the job, as both a line training captain and sim instructor.

Selfmade92
08-15-2018, 05:06 AM
F/O= 24k/yr - 60k/yr USD
CA = 84ky/r - 150k/yr USD

Salary is obviously a lot less than in the US, but Colombia is also a lot cheaper than let's say NYC or Boston.

In their posting online for A320 F/O they show that you have to be citizen or nationalized, no clue if a work permit counts as nationalized or even how to get one?

"Be a Colombian citizen or nationalized (a)." - Avianca A320 F/O posting.



Hope that helps.


Typhoonpilot
08-16-2018, 03:30 PM
You guys realize that Avianca terminated pilots who went on strike last year so any positions open are basically union busting positions. Have some self-respect and stay away from Avianca.

Search "Avianca" here to read the threads on what happened and why you want to stay away from the place.

tailwheel48
08-16-2018, 09:25 PM
They do have some hot 'stews' though ;)

Spin
08-17-2018, 12:39 PM
Yep! They're hiring scabs.

El Pilot
08-18-2018, 06:26 PM
My dad is Colombian and I thought about doing it. You have to pay to convert from FAA Commercial Pilot, to the Colombian equivalent PCA, I think it's called. It includes doing a short written exam and checkride which can be done over there from the many flight schools for a fee of about $2000 USD I heard. Then you need to become a citizen/national. If one of your parents/wife/girlfriend is Colombian, it be easy process. The upside is you can fly an Airbus or Boeing at a lower total time compared to the US. The downside, probably lots of politics involved.. You could be stuck as a FO for a long time and upgrade whenever they feel like it. I would say you are better off flying for the regionals in the US.

Benver
08-22-2018, 07:44 AM
you are out of your mind if you wanna come down here to fly. everyone is trying to fly out ouf here... including myself. You have better chances in the US with the current outlook.

The Dominican
08-23-2018, 05:52 PM
We have a handful of guys from Latinamerican countries here and I know a few more scattered on other contracts in Asia, all the contacts I get through PM's from guys in the latinamerican market are asking about jobs out here, I don't get anyone asking about jobs in any of the carriers of that region, not the one!
I have been offered several jobs over the years "to come back home" sort of speak and none have even caused me to think it through! Director of training, DO, you name it...,The simple truth is that the salaries and job conditions are not very good in the latinamerican market, as much as I would love to go back to my culture, language etc, the salaries are horrible, the working conditions are unstable and riddled with politics, the governments of those countries will let the employees hang out to dry just like they did the Avianca folks that are now scattered all over the place. Nah! As much as I understand the allure, and believe me I do! I wouldn't leave the US market to go to a carrier like LATAM, Avianca etc.

ouzool
10-30-2018, 11:12 AM
But continuing the conversation I'm a US citizen living in Colombia as a resident. I want to get my commercial pilots license and am curious if it would be worth getting my license down here and working here untill I get 1500 hours then moving back to the United States or would the hassle of transferring licences not be worth it? I am not looking to get rich down here but as a way to get hours.

Benver
11-01-2018, 04:49 PM
But continuing the conversation I'm a US citizen living in Colombia as a resident. I want to get my commercial pilots license and am curious if it would be worth getting my license down here and working here untill I get 1500 hours then moving back to the United States or would the hassle of transferring licences not be worth it? I am not looking to get rich down here but as a way to get hours.

if you have your FAA CPL, you need to convert it to the colombian PCA (Commercial). it will cost you about 9millions = 3000USD give or take. will take about 10 days, plus whatever it takes for the Civil Aeronautics to issue a license. If properly executed.... could be 2 months. The good school to convert your license is Adevia in Bogota. If you have legal residency.... you should have no problem getting a job, but I am telling you: this is no joke down here... crew scheduling is absurd, but its a good way to build up the 1500 hours and get a A320 type rating..... I did it and now I am applying for jobs in the USA..... its a good plan....

captjns
11-02-2018, 03:27 AM
if you have your FAA CPL, you need to convert it to the colombian PCA (Commercial). it will cost you about 9millions = 3000USD give or take. will take about 10 days, plus whatever it takes for the Civil Aeronautics to issue a license. If properly executed.... could be 2 months. The good school to convert your license is Adevia in Bogota. If you have legal residency.... you should have no problem getting a job, but I am telling you: this is no joke down here... crew scheduling is absurd, but its a good way to build up the 1500 hours and get a A320 type rating..... I did it and now I am applying for jobs in the USA..... its a good plan....


After flying in Colombia, Bender, it may also be worth an additional investment to add the A320 type rating to your US ATP. You may find that expat flying is a fresh adventure to one’s life’s experience. Now a days, Boeing and Airbus certificates are almost like passports. I won’t say you’ll make a zillion bucks. But it’s, a great way to travel, and live and experience different cultures world wide.

Contrary to claims made by some, expat flying does not disqualify you from gaining employment with a US carrier.

For example, many Chinese carriers have been, and are and will be looking for type rated A320 F/Os. From a recent report, Chinese will make up about 50% or airline passengers by 2040.

Good luck with your career.:)

Benver
11-19-2018, 06:33 AM
thats absolutely true, but I am actually looking more into the USA. The problem with China is that they dont upgrade you to Captain. Its a good destination if you have PIC time on the airplane, but I think Asia is a good place to fly widebody, because 100+ hours per month is only doable (my opinion) flying widebody....

Shibuya
11-28-2018, 12:35 PM
There are airlines that will upgrade you to captain. And why do you want or need to fly 100 hours a month in a widebody? Donít brutalize your body if you donít have to.



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