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Cirrus2turbine
08-18-2018, 06:28 PM
So, looks like I'll need to get my CFI to build the next 300-500 hours to land a job.

I'm the type that needs a more accelerated approach. I have found some accelerated CFI programs. Anyone every use one, good/bad, recommendations, etc would be helpful.


tm602
08-19-2018, 06:37 AM
As a very experienced CFI, and as a professional jet pilot flying the system every day, and as someone who has lost friends to aircraft accidents, take my advice: the CFI is not a course to hurry on. Please take it seriously and learn as much as you can, even if its "slow". The pilots you produce will hold many lives in their hands and speed is not worth it.

Cirrus2turbine
08-19-2018, 09:34 AM
As a very experienced CFI, and as a professional jet pilot flying the system every day, and as someone who has lost friends to aircraft accidents, take my advice: the CFI is not a course to hurry on. Please take it seriously and learn as much as you can, even if its "slow". The pilots you produce will hold many lives in their hands and speed is not worth it.


Thanks, I'm not looking to "rush" it, but to find a school/location that provides a more focused training program. Time and availability dictate that for me and require it.


badflaps
08-19-2018, 12:52 PM
Thanks, I'm not looking to "rush" it, but to find a school/location that provides a more focused training program. Time and availability dictate that for me and require it.

If time and availibility are your primary concerns, I predict a poor outcome.:eek:

Cirrus2turbine
08-20-2018, 07:11 AM
If time and availibility are your primary concerns, I predict a poor outcome.:eek:

Yea, I don't think so. I planned and did my IFR training through pre-prep flying and went to a focused program in Florida. Nailed the Check Ride. Doing pre-flying, prep work on COM with CFI, then heading west to spend a dedicated week to fly and prep for check ride.

I love all the judgements here. My question was about a quality program. I know how to prep and will make sure that I can properly prep for the CFI BEFORE, then do a focused training program. Much like some airlines and others require for type ratings etc.

BobSacamano
08-20-2018, 09:14 AM
So, looks like I'll need to get my CFI to build the next 300-500 hours to land a job.

I'm the type that needs a more accelerated approach. I have found some accelerated CFI programs. Anyone every use one, good/bad, recommendations, etc would be helpful.

Try ďTake Flight San Diego.Ē Google it and PM for more info. Requires a ton of pre-course prep work but if youíre willing to work hard itís fantastic.

misterpretzel
08-20-2018, 10:04 AM
Yea, I don't think so. I planned and did my IFR training through pre-prep flying and went to a focused program in Florida. Nailed the Check Ride. Doing pre-flying, prep work on COM with CFI, then heading west to spend a dedicated week to fly and prep for check ride.

I love all the judgements here. My question was about a quality program. I know how to prep and will make sure that I can properly prep for the CFI BEFORE, then do a focused training program. Much like some airlines and others require for type ratings etc.Some people just can't accept that there are others in the world who learn better through focused, high intensity training. Best of luck to you. I've always heard positives for pray aviation, although they are quite busy.

Sent from my LG-H931 using Tapatalk

BravoPapa
08-20-2018, 02:11 PM
Thanks, I'm not looking to "rush" it, but to find a school/location that provides a more focused training program. Time and availability dictate that for me and require it.

Month concentrated course. Newnan Ga, just south of Atlanta. Scroll for details and training schedule.

https://www.flyfalcon.com/falcon-cfi-academy/

Cirrus2turbine
08-20-2018, 04:07 PM
Some people just can't accept that there are others in the world who learn better through focused, high intensity training. Best of luck to you. I've always heard positives for pray aviation, although they are quite busy.

Sent from my LG-H931 using Tapatalk

Thanks. It's funny, the airlines and military use focused training! One of my best friends went form zero time to flying Harriers in the Marine Corps in less than 200 hours! That's focused training!

tm602
08-22-2018, 11:04 AM
Yea, I don't think so. I planned and did my IFR training through pre-prep flying and went to a focused program in Florida. Nailed the Check Ride.

I love all the judgements here. My question was about a quality program. I know how to prep and will make sure that I can properly prep for the CFI BEFORE, then do a focused training program. Much like some airlines and others require for type ratings etc.

There are no judgements here. If you are not getting the answers you want, you might be wise to pay attention to them.
Doing an accelerated instrument course is miles away from becoming a CFI. You have no idea in the world how fast you will kill yourself and/or others by being inadequately prepared for the CFI. The only way to do this well is to have a training regimen that has adequate time and a CFI showing you as many of the "little tricks" that will make you bend a prop or worse, crash before you even get to pee in your pants over it.
The FOI test and flying the maneuvers are baby poo compared to the real stuff....teaching the maneuvers, instilling a sense of safety, and knowing the difference between letting the students "learn the hard way" vs. having bent birds are where you will be missing out by accelerated programs. So far as acing checkrides goes...never measure your skills or get too high an opinion of yourself because of a checkride. I have had close to 100 initials, recurrents, type rating rides etc and the checkride is about as close to real life flying as kissing your sister is to making out with a girl.

tm602
08-22-2018, 11:06 AM
Thanks. It's funny, the airlines and military use focused training! One of my best friends went form zero time to flying Harriers in the Marine Corps in less than 200 hours! That's focused training!

As a former Marine, I challenge you to ask your friend how many YEARS it was to get that 200 hours. Hint, more than one less than 3. The military is miles more advanced and thorough than civil training.

BravoPapa
08-22-2018, 11:27 AM
Thanks. It's funny, the airlines and military use focused training! One of my best friends went form zero time to flying Harriers in the Marine Corps in less than 200 hours! That's focused training!

Exactly. It's the only way to train IMO. And the most efficient.

Cirrus2turbine
08-22-2018, 06:28 PM
There are no judgements here. If you are not getting the answers you want, you might be wise to pay attention to them.
Doing an accelerated instrument course is miles away from becoming a CFI. You have no idea in the world how fast you will kill yourself and/or others by being inadequately prepared for the CFI. The only way to do this well is to have a training regimen that has adequate time and a CFI showing you as many of the "little tricks" that will make you bend a prop or worse, crash before you even get to pee in your pants over it.
The FOI test and flying the maneuvers are baby poo compared to the real stuff....teaching the maneuvers, instilling a sense of safety, and knowing the difference between letting the students "learn the hard way" vs. having bent birds are where you will be missing out by accelerated programs. So far as acing checkrides goes...never measure your skills or get too high an opinion of yourself because of a checkride. I have had close to 100 initials, recurrents, type rating rides etc and the checkride is about as close to real life flying as kissing your sister is to making out with a girl.


So what you're saying is that working on a concentrated course will not prepare me to be a CFI vs. a guy who took 6 months working on it on the weekends at their home?

badflaps
08-22-2018, 07:39 PM
So what you're saying is that working on a concentrated course will not prepare me to be a CFI vs. a guy who took 6 months working on it on the weekends at their home?
Not at all, however, up until this time only you were responsible, now you will be answering for for someone else.:eek:

tm602
08-23-2018, 09:59 AM
Not at all, however, up until this time only you were responsible, now you will be answering for for someone else.:eek:

Exactly. And they will sue you, your family, anyone to get something out of it.
Spend some time talking to some instructors, or better yet some examiners and ask for some good advice.
You are taking on so much more than a rating here. This is for real, and its no time to be cutting short. You can do it in decent time, but speed should not be the focus. If you were going for heart surgery, would you want a doctor who learned well even if it took him a little longer, or would you want Doogie Howser who took "the fast track"?
I find it so ironic that those who really haven't learned to fly themselves are teaching others to learn to fly. I once had a big problem with that statement and it hurt my little feelings when I was a new CFI because I thought I knew so much. But now, decades later, with thousands of hours f dual given and 6 type ratings as a professional pilot, I understand.
Don't be pulled in to the rush. I know the sense of urgency is there, but the stakes are very high.

PT6 Flyer
08-23-2018, 10:30 AM
Thanks, I'm not looking to "rush" it, but to find a school/location that provides a more focused training program. Time and availability dictate that for me and require it.

Take it from me, a CFI, CFII, MEI, ATP and 135 pilot: I am quite sure that any CFI at almost any flight school will custom-tailor a curriculum for you. Just tell them what you want to do. You don't have to go to an 'expensive flight certificate mill' to receive this kind of training. I used to teach at a 141 school, and we can get you a copy of that type of concentrated curriculum if you want it.

The main thing is doing training five or six days a week vs. only training on the weekend. How many days a week do you want to train?

In regards to pre-flight and post-flight briefings, just have your CFI cover a lot of information in a short period of time each day.

And if you want 'concentrated ground school', just have your CFI give you a lot of reading homework every night, or have him assign a lot of videos to watch. Have him quiz you thoroughly on every night's reading and videos the next day. Have him quiz you on the FAR/AIM, your POH, and military IFR manuals everyday. In addition, there is a LOT of info for a CFI to memorize (e.g., "define Law of Primacy"), so have him also quiz you on this daily.

And I second the sentiment above about getting in touch with an examiner early in your training. If your training includes stage checks, have your examiner give the stage checks.

Cirrus2turbine
08-23-2018, 06:52 PM
Exactly. And they will sue you, your family, anyone to get something out of it.
Spend some time talking to some instructors, or better yet some examiners and ask for some good advice.
You are taking on so much more than a rating here. This is for real, and its no time to be cutting short. You can do it in decent time, but speed should not be the focus. If you were going for heart surgery, would you want a doctor who learned well even if it took him a little longer, or would you want Doogie Howser who took "the fast track"?
I find it so ironic that those who really haven't learned to fly themselves are teaching others to learn to fly. I once had a big problem with that statement and it hurt my little feelings when I was a new CFI because I thought I knew so much. But now, decades later, with thousands of hours f dual given and 6 type ratings as a professional pilot, I understand.
Don't be pulled in to the rush. I know the sense of urgency is there, but the stakes are very high.

Again, I don't get what people are getting at. Not a new pilot and certainly have more hours than many of the CFI's building time to go to a regional. I like focused training and can't believe that a focused curriculum is less effective and makes someone a less effective CFI than a young person with 1/4 my time doing it over months to get that CFI than fire off to train. My age, maturity and experience of owning my own planes has to count for something.

I learn best from a focused, daily working flying program.

dbdevkc
08-23-2018, 07:28 PM
Again, I don't get what people are getting at. Not a new pilot and certainly have more hours than many of the CFI's building time to go to a regional. I like focused training and can't believe that a focused curriculum is less effective and makes someone a less effective CFI than a young person with 1/4 my time doing it over months to get that CFI than fire off to train. My age, maturity and experience of owning my own planes has to count for something.

I learn best from a focused, daily working flying program.

I don't see why you can't do an accelerated approach. Especially if you have a lot of flying experience. It seems to me the difference in programs is not the "amount" of knowledge transferred to you the student/CFI candidate, nor the actual training time, but just the compressed nature of the training itself. Meaning that the non-learning, non-studying time is removed and all that you are left with is the training and studying (and eating and sleeping). Those programs usually require you to have taken and passed the written exams before you start so those are out of the way.

Seriously, I know someone who has almost 1,200 takeoffs and landings, and over 600 flying hours. And mostly taildraggers. By the time they go for their CFI it will be more than that. I would venture a guess that most young starting CFIs don't have anywhere even close to near those numbers.

Just because you are going for your CFI doesn't mean you need to drag it out necessarily.

One thing you do need to be aware of as a CFI, is that all students are trying to kill you. ;)

misterpretzel
08-24-2018, 10:14 AM
Exactly. And they will sue you, your family, anyone to get something out of it.
Spend some time talking to some instructors, or better yet some examiners and ask for some good advice.
You are taking on so much more than a rating here. This is for real, and its no time to be cutting short. You can do it in decent time, but speed should not be the focus. If you were going for heart surgery, would you want a doctor who learned well even if it took him a little longer, or would you want Doogie Howser who took "the fast track"?
I find it so ironic that those who really haven't learned to fly themselves are teaching others to learn to fly. I once had a big problem with that statement and it hurt my little feelings when I was a new CFI because I thought I knew so much. But now, decades later, with thousands of hours f dual given and 6 type ratings as a professional pilot, I understand.
Don't be pulled in to the rush. I know the sense of urgency is there, but the stakes are very high.Do you have any statistically significant evidence that pilots who do accelerated training are worse pilots/cause more crashes/more negligent/deviated more? Or are you just basing your opinion off of a few anecdotes and personal experience?

Sent from my LG-H931 using Tapatalk

BravoPapa
08-24-2018, 02:50 PM
Do you have any statistically significant evidence that pilots who do accelerated training are worse pilots/cause more crashes/more negligent/deviated more? Or are you just basing your opinion off of a few anecdotes and personal experience?

Sent from my LG-H931 using Tapatalk

I would think the statistics favored accelerated training. You fly more often, retain the knowledge better, etc, etc, etc. I really don't understand the thinking against accelerated training. I think it's irrational.

jjc525
09-05-2018, 07:32 PM
CFI Bootcamp. They have a great program Mike the owner is the master! Please note that you need to put forth The effort and follow their program and continue to learn;aviation is a life long learning career. Online Flight Instructor Course California | CFI Training USA (http://www.cfibootcamp.com). I am a 20 plus year CFII and I was super impressed with the program. It is a lot of work but worth it. I took the ground school as a review when The ACS came about. Definitely recommend in person as the teaching skills learned are spot on.

tailwheel48
09-10-2018, 06:48 AM
Anybody used the CFI Academy in Lodi, CA? Would like your opinion.

Thanks.

nate5ks
09-15-2018, 04:16 AM
American Flyers has a 30 day CFI (includes CFII) academy in Ft Lauderdale. I wanted to do it (Iím military, used to drinking from a fire hose) but getting that time off work will be difficult. Might be going to Orient in Homestead.

Cirrus2turbine
10-06-2018, 09:03 AM
Just an update. Completed my ASEL Instrument Commercial this past week. I followed this model:

1. Study for the written via King Schools and other written material for about 3 months. (Also, had to wait until 8/28/18 so that I could do COM check ride in 172. I have the 10+ training hours in TAA) and 10 plus in Mooney.

2. Booked a full week of accelerated flight training in AZ. 2 weeks before I head out here I go for 3 flights with a CFI to get used to flying a 172 again and working on basics, spot landings, maneuvers.

3. Take written the day before my flight to AZ and pass easily.

4. Get to AZ and on Sunday start working on flight training. Me and instructor had a pre-arranged plan and we implement it upon arrival. Every day adjusting for flying and ground work.

5. Took my check ride on Friday and passed. I was prepared for oral and flew the ride very well.

I feel that pre-prep and studying and a clear plan during the week made it possible.

It's my opinion that I could do the same for the CFI!

BravoPapa
10-06-2018, 10:32 AM
Just an update. Completed my ASEL Instrument Commercial this past week. I followed this model:

1. Study for the written via King Schools and other written material for about 3 months. (Also, had to wait until 8/28/18 so that I could do COM check ride in 172. I have the 10+ training hours in TAA) and 10 plus in Mooney.

2. Booked a full week of accelerated flight training in AZ. 2 weeks before I head out here I go for 3 flights with a CFI to get used to flying a 172 again and working on basics, spot landings, maneuvers.

3. Take written the day before my flight to AZ and pass easily.

4. Get to AZ and on Sunday start working on flight training. Me and instructor had a pre-arranged plan and we implement it upon arrival. Every day adjusting for flying and ground work.

5. Took my check ride on Friday and passed. I was prepared for oral and flew the ride very well.

I feel that pre-prep and studying and a clear plan during the week made it possible.

It's my opinion that I could do the same for the CFI!

How many hours you fly with him during the week of training?

Cirrus2turbine
10-06-2018, 03:03 PM
How many hours you fly with him during the week of training?

11 total, with 5 more back home.



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