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View Full Version : RJ Pilot Prep Program


SunnyFL
08-27-2018, 03:38 PM
Good Evening,

I just wanted to get some info from current RPA pilots in regards to the Pilot Prep Program.

I am currently about 9 months or so from mins (need the full 1,500).

Right now I've narrowed down my list to Republic, PSA and Endeavor. I am going off of bases, really want a DCA base as I have family in Virginia as well as factors like QOL, contract and pay. Also taking into account what people say of if you get stuck for whatever reason would you be happy at the regional of your choice.

For someone in today's aviation environment would you recommend doing a program like this?

I don't need any multi time, I wouldn't need the final 100 hours paid by RPA. I am more so worried about will RPA be hiring in the 9 months or so that I will have mins. I am also well aware things can change this far out.

Appreciate any input and guidance. I just wanted to get the opinions of someone who's walked my path and what they think of this program and what they would've done if it was offered to them prior to regionals.

Thanks!


JayD
08-27-2018, 05:47 PM
Good Evening,

I just wanted to get some info from current RPA pilots in regards to the Pilot Prep Program.

I am currently about 9 months or so from mins (need the full 1,500).

Right now I've narrowed down my list to Republic, PSA and Endeavor. I am going off of bases, really want a DCA base as I have family in Virginia as well as factors like QOL, contract and pay. Also taking into account what people say of if you get stuck for whatever reason would you be happy at the regional of your choice.

For someone in today's aviation environment would you recommend doing a program like this?

I don't need any multi time, I wouldn't need the final 100 hours paid by RPA. I am more so worried about will RPA be hiring in the 9 months or so that I will have mins. I am also well aware things can change this far out.

Appreciate any input and guidance. I just wanted to get the opinions of someone who's walked my path and what they think of this program and what they would've done if it was offered to them prior to regionals.

Thanks!

For what itís worth I was recently accepted into LIFT and one of my questions was whether or not LIFT would supply all the pilots Republic needed. Their answer was... ďNot with only this location. We expect to produce around 350-400 pilots per year from LIFT and we estimate we will need at least 800 pilots a year.Ē

I personally think a pilot prep program is good if thatís the regional youíre interested in. Thereís really no downside that I can see.

Swakid8
08-27-2018, 06:10 PM
Start applying about 5-6 months out and keep a eye on the industry as things change.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk


SoFloFlyer
08-27-2018, 08:03 PM
What is this program? Never heard of it.

JayD
08-28-2018, 03:19 AM
What is this program? Never heard of it.

Very similar to the cadet program but for non 141 folks...

http://rjet.com/airline-careers/cadet-opportunities-2/

Macchi30
08-28-2018, 04:36 AM
Good Evening,


Right now I've narrowed down my list to Republic, PSA and Endeavor. I am going off of bases, really want a DCA base as I have family in Virginia as well as factors like QOL, contract and pay. Also taking into account what people say of if you get stuck for whatever reason would you be happy at the regional of your choice.!

Iím trying to stay Iím northern Virginia too. My 3 are PSA, Republic, and Commutair. The main reason I was looking at PSA is because I like how they have CRJ900s, and the flow however, Iím hearing more and more how the flow is very flawed.. Commutair seems interesting tho. Dulles base and they have a pathway program with United that seems to actually have results

Swakid8
08-28-2018, 04:57 AM
Iím trying to stay Iím northern Virginia too. My 3 are PSA, Republic, and Commutair. The main reason I was looking at PSA is because I like how they have CRJ900s, and the flow however, Iím hearing more and more how the flow is very flawed.. Commutair seems interesting tho. Dulles base and they have a pathway program with United that seems to actually have results

Whats flaw about flow? It's a no interview flow that has results as well. Its just going to take a while to flow. Unlike like the CPP where there isn't a guarantee of being accepted...

Macchi30
08-28-2018, 05:13 AM
Whats flaw about flow? It's a no interview flow that has results as well. Its just going to take a while to flow. Unlike like the CPP where there isn't a guarantee of being accepted...

the PSA threads say very bitter things about the flow. The whole ďflow time is actually 15 years (10 pilots/m X 12months X 15years = 1800 (current # of PSA pilots))Ē. Believe me, the advertised 6 year flow is very attractive to me, especially since I do not have a bachelors degree. But what is reality vs propaganda?

Swakid8
08-28-2018, 05:16 AM
the PSA threads say very bitter things about the flow. The whole ďflow time is actually 15 years (10 pilots/m X 12months X 15years = 1800 (current # of PSA pilots))Ē. Believe me, the advertised 6 year flow is very attractive to me, especially since I do not have a bachelors degree. But what is reality vs propaganda?


Hence why I said awhile, but that doesn't make it flawed..........


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Macchi30
08-28-2018, 05:23 AM
Hence why I said awhile, but that doesn't make it flawed..........


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

It sounds flawed to me when they advertise 6-7 years but in reality it may be closer to 15. At that point, itís not really worth advertising, to me at least.

FlyGood
08-28-2018, 06:46 AM
If you donít have a degree, flow is your best hope unless you have military flying experience or a crazy impressive flying resume. Better to get there in 15 years than never get there at all.

greendotplus10
08-28-2018, 07:07 AM
Republic has been upping the number of new hires per class lately. Whether that means they are planning ahead for expansion remains to be seen, but youíll definitely be a qualified candidate and in demand in 9 months or so. You can be awarded DCA within a few months of being on the line, folks from my class did so. The same is true for all the other bases except MIA and IAH at the moment. Upgrade into DCA currently takes about 7 months longer than earliest available upgrade into EWR or LGA at 2.5 years. Hopefully the large classes being held are a sign that more upgrades will be needed in a couple years, helping to lower those upgrade times.

BosoxH60
08-28-2018, 09:07 AM
If you donít have a degree, flow is your best hope unless you have military flying experience or a crazy impressive flying resume. Better to get there in 15 years than never get there at all.

You should be more than able to knock out an online degree of some sort in less than 15 years while working at another regional, if thatís whatís holding you up.

Macchi30
08-28-2018, 01:16 PM
You should be more than able to knock out an online degree of some sort in less than 15 years while working at another regional, if thatís whatís holding you up.

Oh that note. Whatís the best course of action for a regional pilot to work on getting a Bachelors? right now I have enough credits for 1 semester. So that leaves me with 7 semesters. but once I finish my Commercial, multi, and CFI I could count my pilot certs as credits toward the end of my degree right? Maybe eliminating 2 semesters? So, that would only leave me with roughly 5 semesters left. As a regional pilot, how many classes do pilots typically take during a semester in order to work and have time for their class?

SunnyFL
08-28-2018, 02:41 PM
Start applying about 5-6 months out and keep a eye on the industry as things change.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Thank you for the input!

SunnyFL
08-28-2018, 02:43 PM
Republic has been upping the number of new hires per class lately. Whether that means they are planning ahead for expansion remains to be seen, but youíll definitely be a qualified candidate and in demand in 9 months or so. You can be awarded DCA within a few months of being on the line, folks from my class did so. The same is true for all the other bases except MIA and IAH at the moment. Upgrade into DCA currently takes about 7 months longer than earliest available upgrade into EWR or LGA at 2.5 years. Hopefully the large classes being held are a sign that more upgrades will be needed in a couple years, helping to lower those upgrade times.

Great! Thank you very much for the input as well as information in regards to DCA. I do appreciate it!

TheWeatherman
08-28-2018, 03:14 PM
Oh that note. Whatís the best course of action for a regional pilot to work on getting a Bachelors? right now I have enough credits for 1 semester. So that leaves me with 7 semesters. but once I finish my Commercial, multi, and CFI I could count my pilot certs as credits toward the end of my degree right? Maybe eliminating 2 semesters? So, that would only leave me with roughly 5 semesters left. As a regional pilot, how many classes do pilots typically take during a semester in order to work and have time for their class?
Not sure how flight ratings can translate into college credit unless you are doing some type of worthless aviation degree.



As a Regional pilot, you will need to do your college online. It is just not feesable to get the same time off every week.

BosoxH60
08-28-2018, 03:49 PM
Not sure how flight ratings can translate into college credit unless you are doing some type of worthless aviation degree.



As a Regional pilot, you will need to do your college online. It is just not feesable to get the same time off every week.

What degree would you recommend an airline pilot/hopeful get, then? Considering the only thing they really care about is that you have the block checked, why not do something you enjoy, and might actually learn something useful for your career? Yes, you could make the argument that you should have something you could fall back on should you lose your medical, but you can still get that with an aviation degree (airport management, if that's your thing, or parlay it into a Masters in aviation safety, or something).

BosoxH60
08-28-2018, 04:02 PM
Oh that note. Whatís the best course of action for a regional pilot to work on getting a Bachelors? right now I have enough credits for 1 semester. So that leaves me with 7 semesters. but once I finish my Commercial, multi, and CFI I could count my pilot certs as credits toward the end of my degree right? Maybe eliminating 2 semesters? So, that would only leave me with roughly 5 semesters left. As a regional pilot, how many classes do pilots typically take during a semester in order to work and have time for their class?

It really depends on what degree you go for. That's exactly what I did with my school, since the Army paid for all of my ratings, I just used the FAA cert to show that it was completed, and checked the block for the credit. You usually have to be careful that you don't go over arbitrary numbers for how much external credit you have, though... That's stuff you need to talk with your adviser about, though. There are plenty of respected (read: regionally accredited) schools with online programs that you should be able to apply aviation ratings towards credit. You just have to find what's right for you.

I believe Utah Valley University has an online professional pilot program, and is regionally accredited. (I was looking at going there years ago when I was a helicopter guy, and not interested in fixed wing...).

Excelsior has online degree programs as well, and I had good communication with them, just never got into it.

I ended up at Bridgewater, if you care, but they don't have much of an online presence for aviation just yet. (I was only able to get I think two major courses done that way.)

I started my Masters with Florida Tech; not sure what they have for Bachelor's online with aviation focus.

TheWeatherman
08-28-2018, 04:20 PM
What degree would you recommend an airline pilot/hopeful get, then? Considering the only thing they really care about is that you have the block checked, why not do something you enjoy, and might actually learn something useful for your career? Yes, you could make the argument that you should have something you could fall back on should you lose your medical, but you can still get that with an aviation degree (airport management, if that's your thing, or parlay it into a Masters in aviation safety, or something).
It comes down to this. What if you suddenly have heart problems, Epilepsy, or something else one the long list of conditions that will disqualify you from a First Class FAA Medical? That aviation degree is worth about as much as the paper it is written on. Diversify, get a degree in something else you are interested in so you have something to fall back on in-case the unexpected happens. The only instance where an aviation degree can be beneficial is when an R-ATP is attached with it. Otherwise you are right, all it is worth is a box check.

Macchi30
08-28-2018, 05:29 PM
It really depends on what degree you go for. That's exactly what I did with my school, since the Army paid for all of my ratings, I just used the FAA cert to show that it was completed, and checked the block for the credit. You usually have to be careful that you don't go over arbitrary numbers for how much external credit you have, though... That's stuff you need to talk with your adviser about, though. There are plenty of respected (read: regionally accredited) schools with online programs that you should be able to apply aviation ratings towards credit. You just have to find what's right for you.

I believe Utah Valley University has an online professional pilot program, and is regionally accredited. (I was looking at going there years ago when I was a helicopter guy, and not interested in fixed wing...).

Excelsior has online degree programs as well, and I had good communication with them, just never got into it.

I ended up at Bridgewater, if you care, but they don't have much of an online presence for aviation just yet. (I was only able to get I think two major courses done that way.)

I started my Masters with Florida Tech; not sure what they have for Bachelor's online with aviation focus.

Iíve been looking at UVU as you suggested. How many online classes do you think is realistic to do as a regional pilot per semester? Iím just curious about what a rough estimate would be, so I can guess how many years itíd take to get my bachelors.

Macchi30
08-28-2018, 05:31 PM
It comes down to this. What if you suddenly have heart problems, Epilepsy, or something else one the long list of conditions that will disqualify you from a First Class FAA Medical? That aviation degree is worth about as much as the paper it is written on. Diversify, get a degree in something else you are interested in so you have something to fall back on in-case the unexpected happens. The only instance where an aviation degree can be beneficial is when an R-ATP is attached with it. Otherwise you are right, all it is worth is a box check.

Wouldnít an aviation degree still be valid within the aviation field? Like aviation security, airport operations or whatever else?

JayD
08-28-2018, 06:18 PM
Wouldnít an aviation degree still be valid within the aviation field? Like aviation security, airport operations or whatever else?

Remember that itís not just about loss of medical. Itís also about the economy taking a turn and aviation in general getting hit hard. In those cases not only are you out a pilot job but they donít need additional management people in aviation either, so your aviation degree becomes useless. Get your degree in business or accounting or something that doesnít involve aviation to better hedge for the unknown.

SoFloFlyer
08-28-2018, 06:24 PM
It sounds flawed to me when they advertise 6-7 years but in reality it may be closer to 15. At that point, itís not really worth advertising, to me at least.

Thatís assuming EVERY PSA stays for the flow. There are things like PSA CA lifers that choose not to flow, loss of medical, and attrition. PSA pilots get on with many other carriers. So Iíd argue that it actually is closer to 7-10 years for flow. In any case, itís an awesome back up.

TheWeatherman
08-28-2018, 06:46 PM
Wouldnít an aviation degree still be valid within the aviation field? Like aviation security, airport operations or whatever else?
True, but those jobs are limited and a lot of them are given through the 'good ole boy' rather then someone who may be truly qualified.