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View Full Version : American, SWA total time


Bengal
09-07-2018, 08:52 PM
When I fill out apps for AA, SWA, and a few others, it seems that they want me to break down time in type for every type that Iíve ever flown. Without doing so, I cannot get my TT, Multi, Jet, PIC, etc to equal what hours I truly have.

With nearly 7000 hours and a paper logbook, it isnít so easy to fill out the apps that ask for time in each type.

How are others filling out their times when youíve been on a paper logbook forever? Or, do I just need to bite the bullet and convert to electronic?

Thanks for the insight.


Larry in TN
09-08-2018, 02:05 AM
Combine piston GA time into Piston A:SEL and Piston A:MEL categories.

Otterbox
09-08-2018, 03:20 AM
When I fill out apps for AA, SWA, and a few others, it seems that they want me to break down time in type for every type that Iíve ever flown. Without doing so, I cannot get my TT, Multi, Jet, PIC, etc to equal what hours I truly have.

With nearly 7000 hours and a paper logbook, it isnít so easy to fill out the apps that ask for time in each type.

How are others filling out their times when youíve been on a paper logbook forever? Or, do I just need to bite the bullet and convert to electronic?

Thanks for the insight.

Probably just need to bite the bullet... good news is it should find any errors.


rickair7777
09-08-2018, 05:46 AM
Bite the bullet. As you enter each page, check the page totals with the e-book as you go... either to catch errors as they happen than at the end.

Smooth at FL450
09-08-2018, 05:53 AM
Convert to electronic. you won't regret it. logbook errors can sink a candidate if they are egregious enough to look like misrepresentation of qualifications

Bengal
09-08-2018, 06:10 AM
Thank you for the thoughts. Iíll start researching electronic logbooks and get working on it...

echelon
09-08-2018, 07:37 AM
You can pay some companies to convert your paper one for you, which I would consider with 7000hrs. When I did it at ~1500 it took about 2 weeks of kind of half-a$$ed entering, a lot of which you could easily do at work.

Slowmover
09-08-2018, 07:39 AM
I was in the same situation. I converted my paper logbooks into an excel spreadsheet by making one excel row for every page in my logbook. Then multiple columns for aircraft and type of time (PIC, IMC, etc). Discovered some logbook errors along the way. It was a PITA and took hours.

But at the end of the process, I was confident that I had represented my total time (and all the required subcategories) as accurately as possible. I got hired at AA and had zero logbook questions during the interview process. In other words, it was worth it to me.

And I still keep my paper logbook. Old school, yes, but it is a history of my flying life and I like it that way!

RJSAviator76
09-09-2018, 04:22 AM
I was dreading converting my logbook into electronic format. Despite the tediousness of doing it, I can promise you it will be a trip down the memory lane and actually kinda fun. What's better, it'll jog your memory about the stories needed for the interview... you'll have a bunch of "Oh yeah... I remember that!" moments.

But the best part if you're a job-seeker, once you have it done, it'll be a mere click and you'll have all your fields populated to the fraction and in the format you want. For example, LogTen Pro has the reports generator by the vendor, so if you're applying to AA, SWA or FDX, just select PilotCredentials.com as your format and out it goes. Same with Delta and United and AirlineApps. It really makes your logbook totals a breeze.

flensr
09-09-2018, 06:01 PM
When I fill out apps for AA, SWA, and a few others, it seems that they want me to break down time in type for every type that I’ve ever flown. Without doing so, I cannot get my TT, Multi, Jet, PIC, etc to equal what hours I truly have.

With nearly 7000 hours and a paper logbook, it isn’t so easy to fill out the apps that ask for time in each type.

How are others filling out their times when you’ve been on a paper logbook forever? Or, do I just need to bite the bullet and convert to electronic?

Thanks for the insight.

I had only ballpark 2700 hours of mixed fighter and trainer time, and I couldn't get it to consistently add up until I converted to electronic. Too many conversion factors, which "primary" time was PIC or IP or EP or "SEC", etc etc. I did the electronic logbook entry myself but there are companies that will do it for a fee that is quite reasonable considering the career earnings of a post-military 20 year airline career. I used logbook pro and I like it, but the automated report generator aimed at the airline applications is not very up to date. Another product might be able to automatically convert times into the format required by the various applications (they're all different), but I don't have up to date info on that other than logbook pro doesn't have a default report format that matches any of the applications, let alone all of them.

fadec
09-10-2018, 06:40 AM
Use SQL. It's designed for asking these kinds of questions. You don't have to go bonkers with normalization. Keep it simple and use constraints. In theory you should normalize, but in theory a log should be simply appendable as well. If you already have an electronic log but you're finding the query ability lacking, create a single SQL table and import the CSV from your logbook. That's 90% of everything you could ever want.

FlyJay
09-10-2018, 05:42 PM
If you don't mind investing a few $$$ to save you time, the folks over at https://convertmylogbook.com do an excellent job. I used them to convert my logs to electronic and they found a few addition errors I had made over the years. It may be a little pricy for a few thousand hours, but IMO it's worth every penny.

Qotsaautopilot
09-10-2018, 07:21 PM
Use SQL. It's designed for asking these kinds of questions. You don't have to go bonkers with normalization. Keep it simple and use constraints. In theory you should normalize, but in theory a log should be simply appendable as well. If you already have an electronic log but you're finding the query ability lacking, create a single SQL table and import the CSV from your logbook. That's 90% of everything you could ever want.

Is this something pilots should understand? I have no idea what this post means

swaayze
09-11-2018, 07:56 AM
Is this something pilots should understand? I have no idea what this post means

You, sir, are not alone. I suspect itís some sort of computer language gobbledygook.

Now how do I charge up this iPad thingy again?

at6d
09-11-2018, 09:11 AM
Structured Querry Language. Itís a database code. Users can build a function to input and manipulate data, gather data, etc but on a large scale I.e. industrial size (you could put every pilot logbook in the USA onto a SQL server and use it to manipulate specific information).

Itís been around a long time.

....aaaand Iím out.

canuckian
09-11-2018, 07:37 PM
I finally converted mine to Logten Pro. With almost 10,000 hours it took a while but I no longer get a knot in my stomach when I have to come up with a number for a specific type.
Best part for me is that I went and bought a MacBook Pro for the task. Best Buy screwed up the open box price and sold me a $2400 MacBook for $1000. As soon as I finished I sold it for a profit. Now I just use an iPad.

Smooth at FL450
09-11-2018, 07:53 PM
Is this something pilots should understand? I have no idea what this post means


Seriously! In English, please? Know your audience...

TeamSasquatch
09-15-2018, 11:46 AM
So, SQL isnít somomes initials?

:eek:

Simpsons
09-16-2018, 03:55 PM
So, SQL isnít somomes initials?

:eek:
Excel is also pretty easy and any functions you need can easily be googled. Mostly just sum and sumif functions

RJSAviator76
09-18-2018, 03:03 AM
Structured Querry Language. Itís a database code. Users can build a function to input and manipulate data, gather data, etc but on a large scale I.e. industrial size (you could put every pilot logbook in the USA onto a SQL server and use it to manipulate specific information).

Itís been around a long time.

....aaaand Iím out.

Could you moonlight at SWA IT for some pull? ;)

at6d
09-18-2018, 10:33 AM
LOL

Iíd have to dust off my 386 and brush up on my DOS commands!

WHACKMASTER
09-24-2018, 03:01 AM
LOL

Iíd have to dust off my 386 and brush up on my DOS commands!

Yeah. So? Me thinks youíd still be ahead of SWA IT.

crewdawg
09-28-2018, 03:19 AM
Yeah. So? Me thinks youíd still be ahead of SWA IT.

LOL, must be an industry thing. Everyone thinks their airlines IT is the worst. I've dealt with 3 airlines and AAL takes the cake with it's Green screen stuff.

WHACKMASTER
09-28-2018, 03:52 AM
LOL, must be an industry thing. Everyone thinks their airlines IT is the worst. I've dealt with 3 airlines and AAL takes the cake with it's Green screen stuff.

Iíve dealt with four and SWA takes the cake for technology aversion. Theyíre trying to change but itís tragic to witness sometimes. At least we were finally using autobrakes and autothrottles by the time I showed up on property, but to see what they stripped out of the better equipped ďadoptedĒ 737s was pathetic.....and infuriating.



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