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View Full Version : Free FAA testing, weird situation


yeeeyeee
09-19-2018, 05:24 PM
Iím about to take an ATP written exam. I was in the Navy for 28 days...yes you heard that correctly. I received an administrative discharge due to medical reasons during Officer Candidate School. I did receive an official DD214 for the month I was in. Can I still take the FAA written test at a military facility? I donít consider myself a veteran or ever really ďin the militaryĒ, but the test would be free rather than having to spend $165 at a civilian facility.


rickair7777
09-19-2018, 06:30 PM
You were not in long enough to qualify for any veterans benefits, other than possible VA medical if you were injured and then discharged.

yeeeyeee
09-19-2018, 07:24 PM
You were not in long enough to qualify for any veterans benefits, other than possible VA medical if you were injured and then discharged.

What is the minimum time? 90 or 180 days?


Gundriver64
09-20-2018, 02:47 AM
What is the minimum time? 90 or 180 days?

On a military facility? Don't you need a CAC card to use military facilities?

TiredSoul
09-20-2018, 06:30 AM
How will this affect your FAA medical?

yeeeyeee
09-20-2018, 07:09 AM
How will this affect your FAA medical?

It was an eye sight problem. Got PRK surgery to fix it, 20/15 currently.

yeeeyeee
09-20-2018, 07:10 AM
On a military facility? Don't you need a CAC card to use military facilities?

Iím not sure. Maybe a DD214 will suffice, but I was only in for 28 days. I donít know

rickair7777
09-20-2018, 07:18 AM
What is the minimum time? 90 or 180 days?

It's complicated. Some benefits are for very low service time, even one day, but that's mainly for guard/reserve personnel who can be recalled to active duty and conducting combat ops in a matter of days. But those are people who are already trained and in the system.

But for many "on base" services, like a test center, it may come down to to access. If you don't have an ID card to get on base, you can't use the facility. Many services, like the gym, typically card you at the door as well, to keep contractors and other hangers-on from accessing things they're not entitled to.

An Entry-Level Separation (ESL) is going to provide essentially nothing but VA medical for conditions caused or aggravated by service. If there is significant disability, then you'll be eligible for more VA benefits, but that's only for service connected problems. If you showed up with a disqualifying condition, you probably get no benefits for that. They do try to catch stuff like that at DODMERB, before people actually report for training but it's possible for something to pop up between DODMERB and day one of training. Also common for pilots candidates to get additional eye exams in training, which will disqualify you if failed.

SaltyDog
09-20-2018, 10:28 AM
Iím about to take an ATP written exam. I was in the Navy for 28 days...yes you heard that correctly. I received an administrative discharge due to medical reasons during Officer Candidate School. I did receive an official DD214 for the month I was in. Can I still take the FAA written test at a military facility? I donít consider myself a veteran or ever really ďin the militaryĒ, but the test would be free rather than having to spend $165 at a civilian facility.

Length of Service Criteria for Veteran Status
For people who enlisted prior to September 8, 1980, no minimum length of service is necessary to be considered a veteran for most VA benefits. However, certain minimum length of service requirements apply to people who enlisted on or after September 8, 1980. The general requirement is the ďfull periodĒ for which the servicemember was called or ordered to active duty or, if less, 24 months of continuous active duty.

Several exceptions exist to this rule. For example, service-connected disability compensation benefits are exempt from the length of service requirement. Thus, a veteran with a disease or injury incurred during active service generally may receive service-connected compensation for that disability.
Other exceptions to the minimum service requirements include claims for VA life insurance benefits, hardship discharges, and persons retired or separated from service because of a service-related disability.

If the former servicemember did not serve for the full period of active duty and served less than 24 months, and none of the statutory exceptions apply, then the veteran did not complete a minimum period of active duty and is ďnot eligible for any benefit under Title 38, United States Code or under any law administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs based on that period of active service.Ē

Not sure how the FAA judges veteran status. This is simply the VA definition.

sailingfun
09-23-2018, 04:16 AM
It was an eye sight problem. Got PRK surgery to fix it, 20/15 currently.

They booted you because you were not 20/20?

rickair7777
09-23-2018, 05:52 AM
They booted you because you were not 20/20?

The navy would drop you like a hot potato. Needed 20/20 up until wings, then you could get glasses. And they did spot checks along the way. Really wanted to preserve that 20/20 culture I guess.

CX500T
09-23-2018, 06:18 AM
I had 20/30 and was fine (OCS in 2001).

I was already in the Navy pre OCS though.

155mm
09-23-2018, 09:48 AM
I received an administrative discharge due to medical reasons during Officer Candidate School. I did receive an official DD214 for the month I was in.

BTW, Depending on the State you live in, you may be able to get "Veteran" placed on your Drivers License by presenting your DD214 with an Honorable Discharge. A medical discharge is usually service under honorable conditions.
Some "civilian" benefits include; discounts at restaurants, Home depot, college tuition savings, etc....Just a thought.

155mm
09-23-2018, 09:51 AM
Length of Service Criteria for Veteran Status
For people who enlisted prior to September 8, 1980, no minimum length of service is necessary to be considered a veteran for most VA benefits. However, certain minimum length of service requirements apply to people who enlisted on or after September 8, 1980. The general requirement is the “full period” for which the servicemember was called or ordered to active duty or, if less, 24 months of continuous active duty.

Several exceptions exist to this rule. For example, service-connected disability compensation benefits are exempt from the length of service requirement. Thus, a veteran with a disease or injury incurred during active service generally may receive service-connected compensation for that disability.
Other exceptions to the minimum service requirements include claims for VA life insurance benefits, hardship discharges, and persons retired or separated from service because of a service-related disability.

If the former servicemember did not serve for the full period of active duty and served less than 24 months, and none of the statutory exceptions apply, then the veteran did not complete a minimum period of active duty and is “not eligible for any benefit under Title 38, United States Code or under any law administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs based on that period of active service.”

Not sure how the FAA judges veteran status. This is simply the VA definition.

Also,I think if you have 180 days of active duty service you can get a VA certificate for a housing loan.

e6bpilot
09-23-2018, 10:03 AM
Doesnít matter. You need an ID card to take advantage of on base services. As I recall, the FAA tests were only free for active and reserve anyway. Spend the $75 and do it off base.

Excargodog
09-23-2018, 11:47 AM
PRK? Not LASIK?

Was there a reason for that? Typically vision takes longer to stabilize after treatment with PRK and is more prone to complications.

Please tell me you didn't have PRK done and try to sneak it by before you went in active duty in hopes of getting a flying slot. The military has been watching for that since the 1980s.

rickair7777
09-23-2018, 03:18 PM
PRK? Not LASIK?

Was there a reason for that? Typically vision takes longer to stabilize after treatment with PRK and is more prone to complications.

Please tell me you didn't have PRK done and try to sneak it by before you went in active duty in hopes of getting a flying slot. The military has been watching for that since the 1980s.

For a long time the Navy only accepted PRK, LASIK was no go due to concerns about the flap coming loose in an ejection.

RK never allowed, for good reasons.

Otterbox
09-23-2018, 04:49 PM
They booted you because you were not 20/20?

Sounds like the DOR vs redesignation route after failing a flight physical..l

tanker
09-24-2018, 03:19 AM
Sounds like the DOR vs redesignation route after failing a flight physical..l
I agree because you donít need 20/20 to be a NFO or any other type of officer in the Navy

e6bpilot
09-24-2018, 08:23 AM
Not necessarily. The Navy redesignates at their discretion. When I was a student, all DORs and attrites redesignated, the vast majority as SWOs.
When I was an instructor, I saw guys who graduated from the academy/ROTC in the spring decide to DOR and they were on the streets with less than a year of active duty.
It changes all the time and if you pick up a specific designator for OCS and are found to be physically nonqualified, it is a lot easier to just do an entry level separation and be done with someone.

To the OP, just pay for it at a testing center. I was active duty and rather than deal with the red tape to get the test done on base, I just went to my local FBO. Much mo bettah.

rickair7777
09-24-2018, 08:39 AM
Yes sometimes they redesignate you, sometimes they give youa choice, sometimes you're sent home. Depends on their needs at the time.

hydrostream
09-24-2018, 10:04 AM
You need an ID card to access those benefits. Your DD214 only gets you that card if you qualify. Depending on your separation code you only have those benefits for a certain amount of time after the date you separate. Call your local DEERS if you have questions about it.

155mm
09-24-2018, 10:30 AM
You need an ID card to access those benefits. Your DD214 only gets you that card if you qualify. Depending on your separation code you only have those benefits for a certain amount of time after the date you separate. Call your local DEERS if you have questions about it.

Great advice! Also, take'em all for free if you are eligible. ATP, Dispatcher, AGI, FOI, IGI, CFI, etc.

lookmom
09-24-2018, 11:53 AM
Iím not sure if youíre aware (or what Iím missing in your situation), but in order to be able to take the ATP/ATM written test nowadays, you have to meet CFR61.156, which requires that you have a graduation certificate from an ATP-CTP class. Most ATP-CTP facilities have a written test center on-site which is included in the course costs along with the Shepard Air study guide. So, I donít know why anyone would be concerned about written costs if it is in the ďpackageĒ deal.

Only reason why those who are (military) eligible would want to take the written test at a military testing facility is because that person wanted additional time to study the Shepard guide after their ATP-CTP class and had access to a military base. Usually youíre scheduled for the written the day after the course graduation at the ATP-CTP center.

Iím an AD military dependant, contacted my local military testing facility, and was informed that I qualified based on dependant status to take the written there. I wouldíve had to present the ATP-CTP graduation certificate as well.
Although thatís not your specific status, hope it helps those out there

Iím about to take an ATP written exam. I was in the Navy for 28 days...yes you heard that correctly. I received an administrative discharge due to medical reasons during Officer Candidate School. I did receive an official DD214 for the month I was in. Can I still take the FAA written test at a military facility? I donít consider myself a veteran or ever really ďin the militaryĒ, but the test would be free rather than having to spend $165 at a civilian facility.



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