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View Full Version : Commercial checkride question


mikeinflight
09-27-2018, 10:17 AM
Hi all,

I am getting ready to take my commercial ride soon and was wondering what others have used as far as a flight plan for the XC and deviation portion of the ride. For my PPL at a different school we did everything with a paper navlog and when I had to deviate it was all paper and pencil based on triangulating my position from two VORs and then doing time distance fuel etc.

What was everyone elseís experience? This new school I am at I believe allows ForeFlight and Iím flying a g1000 Cessna 172. I plan on doing a paper navlog again as well but would be super easy to deviate with ForeFlight or even the g1000.

Thanks for the insight.


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JohnBurke
09-27-2018, 10:37 AM
How about a plain old paper chart?

If I know I can travel six inches on the map in an hour, then the airport three inches from my course line is a half hour away.

The batteries never quit.

mikeinflight
09-27-2018, 11:00 AM
How about a plain old paper chart?



If I know I can travel six inches on the map in an hour, then the airport three inches from my course line is a half hour away.



The batteries never quit.



Absolutely, I trained that way but the EFBs is what everyone uses now.


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JohnBurke
09-27-2018, 12:20 PM
Absolutely, I trained that way but the EFBs is what everyone uses now.


Everyone? Really?

mikeinflight
09-27-2018, 12:51 PM
Everyone? Really?



Not literally. I see this was a waste to come on to this forum for any advice.


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metalfeather
09-27-2018, 02:49 PM
Not literally. I see this was a waste to come on to this forum for any advice.


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I would say use commercial-level aeronautical decision making and resource management. There's an asvanced cockpit display that will do your diversion calculations in less than a minute, but it has limitations.

If you are familiar with the G1000 enough to use NRST, evaluate the different airports and choose best option with a route that doesn't take you through hazards, use it. Don't be surprised if the G1000 gives you a course straight through a mountain, weather or airspace. Be ready to adjust the course to keep safety in mind.

Use paper charts if you only know how to navigate via direct-to-enter-enter. Limit exposing your less proficient skillsets, but make plans to get comfortable with cockpit displays. I would only go to the checkride when familiar with all the equipment in the aircraft, it's all fair game on the practical.

Be ready and able to do either method. Talk to other students or the examiner to get an idea which method is preferred.

JohnBurke
09-27-2018, 02:59 PM
I see this was a waste to come on to this forum for any advice.


For you, yes.

You asked for the experience of others. You got it. You didn't like it. You're whining about it.

Thus endeth act one.

badflaps
09-27-2018, 03:11 PM
How about a plain old paper chart?

If I know I can travel six inches on the map in an hour, then the airport three inches from my course line is a half hour away.

The batteries never quit.

If worse comes to worser a dollar bill is six inches.

TiredSoul
09-27-2018, 04:55 PM
Is there a navigation portion in your CPL? I didnít think so.
Itís just maneuvers unless Iím really getting old.

mikeinflight
09-27-2018, 05:15 PM
I would say use commercial-level aeronautical decision making and resource management. There's an asvanced cockpit display that will do your diversion calculations in less than a minute, but it has limitations.



If you are familiar with the G1000 enough to use NRST, evaluate the different airports and choose best option with a route that doesn't take you through hazards, use it. Don't be surprised if the G1000 gives you a course straight through a mountain, weather or airspace. Be ready to adjust the course to keep safety in mind.



Use paper charts if you only know how to navigate via direct-to-enter-enter. Limit exposing your less proficient skillsets, but make plans to get comfortable with cockpit displays. I would only go to the checkride when familiar with all the equipment in the aircraft, it's all fair game on the practical.



Be ready and able to do either method. Talk to other students or the examiner to get an idea which method is preferred.



This is helpful. Thank you. I plan on using paper charts and having the g1000 and firefight as backups.


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B757
09-27-2018, 07:10 PM
This is helpful. Thank you. I plan on using paper charts and having the g1000 and firefight as backups.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk..Nice to have all that fancy equipment onboard, isnīt it ..??..However, be prepared to navigate the old way, just in case all that fails..But you already knew this..!!

..BTW disregard JB..For some reason, he spends too much time on this board, confronting others with his advice and experiences..As anybody reading these posts know by now..A guy with all this knowledge, could really help the younger generation with his expertise and time spent in aviation..Unfortunately, he has chosen a different path..

..Good luck !!..

Fly safe,
B757

JohnBurke
09-27-2018, 11:53 PM
Unfortunately, he has chosen a different path..


Get the **** off my lawn.

BravoPapa
09-28-2018, 05:12 AM
Is there a navigation portion in your CPL? I didnít think so.
Itís just maneuvers unless Iím really getting old.

You must be getting old. Thereís a navigation portion just like on the private. Have to hit two to three check points and then with a diversion.

mikeinflight
09-28-2018, 05:12 AM
..Nice to have all that fancy equipment onboard, isnīt it ..??..However, be prepared to navigate the old way, just in case all that fails..But you already knew this..!!



..BTW disregard JB..For some reason, he spends too much time on this board, confronting others with his advice and experiences..As anybody reading these posts know by now..A guy with all this knowledge, could really help the younger generation with his expertise and time spent in aviation..Unfortunately, he has chosen a different path..



..Good luck !!..



Fly safe,

B757



Thank you for the encouragement B757. I have always been trained to plan on all failing so that has been engrained in my head.

Have a great weekend.


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BravoPapa
09-28-2018, 05:18 AM
Just took my commercial and was allowed to use my iPad with ForeFlight, but I had to disable the airplane on the map. And I could not use the GPS in the plane since of course it has an airplane on it and showing your position. So it was just using the iPad in leiu of a paper chart using pilotage as if I had a paper chart. But Iím sure it varies with different DPEs.

He did allow me to use the two finger method on ForeFlight to determine my distance and direction and time to the alternate though.

walker0789
10-05-2018, 07:00 PM
I agree that JB provides zero insight and is simply a troll on here.

TiredSoul
10-06-2018, 06:43 AM
I agree that JB provides zero insight and is simply a troll on here.

And thatís pretty strong from somebody with only 4 posts and no threads started.

misterpretzel
10-06-2018, 09:26 AM
And thatís pretty strong from somebody with only 4 posts and no threads started.

Quality > quantity

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JohnBurke
10-06-2018, 11:40 AM
Children of the magenta line.

misterpretzel
10-06-2018, 12:33 PM
Staunch supporters of the Trump administration.

Oh so we weren't just blurting out unnecessary generalizations?

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JohnBurke
10-07-2018, 02:43 PM
You're 20-something low-post millennial who can't contribute to the thread, aren't you?

And now you're dragging in irrelevant political garbage.

Not one word addressing the thread.

Classy.

misterpretzel
10-07-2018, 10:56 PM
You're 20-something low-post millennial who can't contribute to the thread, aren't you?

And now you're dragging in irrelevant political garbage.

Not one word addressing the thread.

Classy.I merely did what you did, no need to be a hypocrite

But since we're here, you might as well explain how "children of the magenta line" positively addresses the thread

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JohnBurke
10-07-2018, 11:37 PM
That you don't understand the concept speaks volumes. As you've failed to contribute to the thread even once, it's clear you're dead weight. No further conversation with you.


This message is hidden because misterpretzel is on your ignore list.


A vast improvement.

A deviation entered the practical test because while it's such a mindless and simple thing to do, in todays cockpits, students were struggling with anything that took them off the magenta line. Prior to reducing cockpit skill to worship of the magenta line, one was expected to know where one was all the time, such that diversion options were always part of situational awareness...every bit as much as already having a forced landing site picked out when flying A to B. It's basic airmanship.

The irony is that in advanced cockpits, which today is anything with a handheld GPS on up, diversion is as dirt-simple as hitting the nearest button. One should have already made the diversion planning before ever departing, however, and should already know the options that are only confirmed by double checking weather and then diverting. These are not issues with which one needs to struggle enroute. 14 CFR 91.103(a) demands that the PIC become familiar with this information before the flight.

There are simple rules of thumb or ways to make quick determinations enroute, however, and these have been presented, thus contributing early to the thread.

Some have entered here with absolutely zero to contribute, and continue to do just that.

PittsS1
10-08-2018, 06:34 AM
Hi all,

I am getting ready to take my commercial ride soon and was wondering what others have used as far as a flight plan for the XC and deviation portion of the ride.


The only answer that matters is what is the DPE going to expect?



I have had DPE's say I could use my iPad, as long as I brought paper charts. I have had DPE's tell me I could not use my iPad for anything other than plates. My CPL SEL ride when the DPE gave me my diversion, I knew where I was and turned directly to the closest airport and told him we were 20 mins out, I used nothing else. For my multi, the DPE was quizzing me on the G1000 during the ride and expected me to be able to use just it to include pulling up plates.



I think you are over thinking it.... Use your favorite method to determine how to get there.... And don't be surprised if the first method you pick "fails". So if you use your iPad, expect it to fail and go to the GPS. If you use the GPS, expect it to fail and have to go to something else.

misterpretzel
10-08-2018, 09:57 AM
That you don't understand the concept speaks volumes. As you've failed to contribute to the thread even once, it's clear you're dead weight. No further conversation with you.



A vast improvement.

A deviation entered the practical test because while it's such a mindless and simple thing to do, in todays cockpits, students were struggling with anything that took them off the magenta line. Prior to reducing cockpit skill to worship of the magenta line, one was expected to know where one was all the time, such that diversion options were always part of situational awareness...every bit as much as already having a forced landing site picked out when flying A to B. It's basic airmanship.

The irony is that in advanced cockpits, which today is anything with a handheld GPS on up, diversion is as dirt-simple as hitting the nearest button. One should have already made the diversion planning before ever departing, however, and should already know the options that are only confirmed by double checking weather and then diverting. These are not issues with which one needs to struggle enroute. 14 CFR 91.103(a) demands that the PIC become familiar with this information before the flight.

There are simple rules of thumb or ways to make quick determinations enroute, however, and these have been presented, thus contributing early to the thread.

Some have entered here with absolutely zero to contribute, and continue to do just that.

Yeah cause all of that can be inferred from your sneeringly made comment. Sorry we aren't all as proficidnt of pilots as you, oh great one.

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