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jacburn
10-08-2018, 03:50 PM
There were 3 positions that went unfilled for CA upgrades for Nov.

Those 3 open spots are now filled with new hires that will go through the new hire training and sims as CA’s.

We are back to immediate upgrades when hired for November.


The December upgrade announcement states we are looking for six more upgrades in December. :cool:


TURF17
10-16-2018, 06:40 AM
So, I've been in the regionals most of my airline career. I've been through two furloughs, so I'm one of those lost decade pilots when we all went through that ugly recession. I'm currently at a airline that has potential growth but not willing to put up the money to attract and retain. My goal is to get hired by United but it is a murky pathway. So, just trying my best to make a clear choice on getting aboard UAL.

Curious how bonus money works, if hired as DEC?


How about reserve life as a DEC. If a commuter and with current growth how many days in crashpad can one might expect? Also, how long on reserve as a DEC until one would see a line?


How many guys from your CPP are being hired each year or at least in the pool of new hires? Approximate time frame from being put in pool to starting class is what?


Does C5 have AQP? If so, is it a nine or twelve month rotation?



Thanks for your feedback and any other insight as I chew on these questions and more.

JediCheese
10-16-2018, 08:17 AM
Curious how bonus money works, if hired as DEC?


How about reserve life as a DEC. If a commuter and with current growth how many days in crashpad can one might expect? Also, how long on reserve as a DEC until one would see a line?


How many guys from your CPP are being hired each year or at least in the pool of new hires? Approximate time frame from being put in pool to starting class is what?


Does C5 have AQP? If so, is it a nine or twelve month rotation?



Thanks for your feedback and any other insight as I chew on these questions and more.
Bonus money is bonus money. It's paid out to all captains quarterly.

Don't know about reserve captains. They've been short lately on captains so reserves have been flying. Dulles is overstaffed and EWR is understaffed.

Usually those off CQF are getting lines in EWR. CQF is ~2-4 months as the company scours the pilot group for people they can upgrade to captain. Might get slightly longer because the company is going to need to hire street captains which take 3-4 months to complete full training vs the 1-2 months required for just upgrade.

When the music stops, the bottom ~10 pilots are going to get stuck as CQFs and that's a bad place to be. No idea on what reserve life is like as a commuter but I've heard it's not fun.

There's a bunch of people in the 'pool' but they don't have the requirements. If you have a degree, when you get 1,000 PIC here you're off to United within ~30-60 days. I know of two guys that just recently got their 1,000 PIC here (under 2 weeks ago) and will be off to United by Christmas. They're running about 3 C5 pilots per United class, but that's assuming they can scrape up 3 pilots here that have passed the CPP and have the requirements. Fair warning, Past Performance Is Not Indicative Of Future Results.

No AQP. Full on checkrides/LOFT/PC.


TURF17
10-16-2018, 08:45 AM
Ok but hired as DEC you forfeit the 22,100 bonus money?

Any word how those that are getting offered are saying how the CPP process is - fair?

JediCheese
10-16-2018, 08:56 AM
Ok but hired as DEC you forfeit the 22,100 bonus money?

Any word how those that are getting offered are saying how the CPP process is - fair?
We don't have DECs. Everyone is hired as a FO.

The company offers X captain spots each month. Should you meet the FAA requirements to be CA (there are no other company requirements), they will offer it to you if no one above you has bid for it. It's straight seniority.

Right now, since they're run out of CA qualified pilots as FOs, they are giving new hires CA spots per seniority order.

The new hire bonus money is outside of anything the Union has agreed. You'll get the $22,100 bonus (or whatever they are offering).

marshal
10-16-2018, 08:56 AM
Ok but hired as DEC you forfeit the 22,100 bonus money?

Any word how those that are getting offered are saying how the CPP process is - fair?

You would still get the 22,100 when you start indoc.

The CPP started out rocky a far as pass rates go, but it has gotten a lot better over the last year. You can have one failure in either the Hogan or interview and try that item a year later to continue the process.

TURF17
10-16-2018, 09:00 AM
Overall how well is the ground operations in bases/outstations? Aircraft MX?

How big is the company on fuel conservation?

How is the training program? How well are your manuals written?

JediCheese
10-16-2018, 09:12 AM
Overall how well is the ground operations in bases/outstations? Aircraft MX?

How big is the company on fuel conservation?

How is the training program? How well are your manuals written?

Ground operations are the same across all UAX carriers. We all use the same ground operation as Expressjet/AirWisky/Mesa/Republic in bases and out stations. Some good, some are bad. Only thing special we use is the C130 gates in EWR which run less well than the A gates, but better than most outstations. Company says the C130 gates have better performance than the A gates so your guess is as good as mine how it all works out.

MX has no idea what they are doing when it's something not straightforward as pull and replace or pouring in more oil/hydraulic fluid. But the 145 is a simple plane and that's all that's really needed. Sometimes when it's a fault that they need to track down and it's not a simple fix, they have issues running it down.

The company is getting bigger on fuel conservation. It's not so much the company as United who is footing the fuel bill.

The training program is special. The good part is they're fixing it but there's a lot to fix. Two steps forward, one step back. Biggest complaint with training are the quality of the offline instructors (I have avoided them and it's worked out well for me).

The manuals are a mess because the non-flying people are still writing the books. Lots to fix and two steps forward and one step back which is the same as the training department.

TURF17
10-16-2018, 09:13 AM
Does anyone know the numbers that UAL is pulling from to fill their classes?
With the other regionals, I would expect more being pulled into the pool due to the size of their pilot staff. Would it be fair to say that 70% of UAL new hires are coming from CPP/Flow agreements?

TURF17
10-16-2018, 09:21 AM
You would still get the 22,100 when you start indoc.

The CPP started out rocky a far as pass rates go, but it has gotten a lot better over the last year. You can have one failure in either the Hogan or interview and try that item a year later to continue the process.

Ground operations are the same across all UAX carriers. We all use the same ground operation as Expressjet/AirWisky/Mesa/Republic in bases and out stations.

MX has no idea what they are doing when it's something not straightfoward as pull and replace.

The company is getting bigger on fuel conservation. It's not so much the company as United who is footing the fuel bill.

The training program is special. The good part is they're fixing it but there's a lot to fix. Two steps forward, one step back. Biggest complaint with training are the quality of the offline instructors (I have avoided them and it's worked out well for me).

The manuals are a mess because the non-flying people are still writing the books. Lots to fix and two steps forward and one step back which is the same as the training department.


Writing manuals is not my cup of tea but I have given suggestions at previous carriers just to say I gave my two cents. I hear your frustrations and have always tried to follow my carriers SOPs. It is shocking how long some of these airlines have been in business when you start reading their manuals.

TURF17
10-16-2018, 09:41 AM
So, a lot of time in the CRJ 200/700/900. How does the ERJ145 perform on routes you guys fly? How about high altitude - any faults? How would you say the aircraft is to set-up from cold dark to taxing out to the runway? Are your checklist lengthy or compressed for the NE corridor?
I've done a lot of flying myself out in the NE and having the right tools does make the job in that part of the area easier.

c402fr8er
10-16-2018, 10:29 AM
So, a lot of time in the CRJ 200/700/900. How does the ERJ145 perform on routes you guys fly? How about high altitude - any faults? How would you say the aircraft is to set-up from cold dark to taxing out to the runway? Are your checklist lengthy or compressed for the NE corridor?
I've done a lot of flying myself out in the NE and having the right tools does make the job in that part of the area easier.


The 145 has been operating these segments for close to 20 years now. Keep it on speed and follow the profile, and it's a *****cat.

It will march right up to FL370 at ISA +10 at most weights, and then (slowly) accelerate to .79 all day long. Upper 20's you might have issues if its warm out, sometimes will top out at 280KIAS, but it's a very straight forward airplane. Only real gotcha is making some of the crossing restrictions when descending into an icing layer if you're not planning on the thrust bump.

Oh, and get used to doing your own descent planning, as we don't have VNAV or auto throttles.


Checklists and flows could be improved, and are also a work in progress, but if you're competent, or even slightly below average like me, you'll have no issues.

Biggest beef, in the NE especially, is not having D-ATIS setup on ACARS, especially when doing IOE. It can be a bit much to have to get ATIS and talk to ops while also keeping an eye on number 1, because the new guy is getting only every 3rd radio call from N90.

But, things are improving steadily on all fronts. And movement is fast. Come in, do your time, and move on. Try to make a positive impact if you can/want to. Or show up, fly your trip and go home.

TURF17
10-16-2018, 10:49 AM
The 145 has been operating these segments for close to 20 years now. Keep it on speed and follow the profile, and it's a *****cat.

It will march right up to FL370 at ISA +10 at most weights, and then (slowly) accelerate to .79 all day long. Upper 20's you might have issues if its warm out, sometimes will top out at 280KIAS, but it's a very straight forward airplane. Only real gotcha is making some of the crossing restrictions when descending into an icing layer if you're not planning on the thrust bump.

Oh, and get used to doing your own descent planning, as we don't have VNAV or auto throttles.


Checklists and flows could be improved, and are also a work in progress, but if you're competent, or even slightly below average like me, you'll have no issues.

Biggest beef, in the NE especially, is not having D-ATIS setup on ACARS, especially when doing IOE. It can be a bit much to have to get ATIS and talk to ops while also keeping an eye on number 1, because the new guy is getting only every 3rd radio call from N90.

But, things are improving steadily on all fronts. And movement is fast. Come in, do your time, and move on. Try to make a positive impact if you can/want to. Or show up, fly your trip and go home.
Surprising you don't have D-ATIS. How about PDC? Do you currently fly the line at CA? How about PM me.

Freebreakfast11
10-16-2018, 11:25 AM
Surprising you don't have D-ATIS. How about PDC? Do you currently fly the line at CA? How about PM me.

Only W&B and comms with dispatch.

tothebigblue
10-16-2018, 03:48 PM
Bonus money is bonus money.

No AQP. Full on checkrides/LOFT/PC.

1. Bonus money can be taken away overnight.
2. PCs are an unnecessary pressure on your airline career.

JediCheese
10-16-2018, 05:52 PM
1. Bonus money can be taken away overnight.
2. PCs are an unnecessary pressure on your airline career.
Depends. The sign on bonus money can be taken away. The quarterly CA bonus payouts are fixed per an LOA.

I agree PCs are a risk to an airline career. We just got FOQA and are unlikely to get AQP anytime soon.

TURF17
10-16-2018, 06:35 PM
Depends. The sign on bonus money can be taken away. The quarterly CA bonus payouts are fixed per an LOA.

I agree PCs are a risk to an airline career. We just got FOQA and are unlikely to get AQP anytime soon.


I appreciate the insight. Hard making decisions with the 121 climate we're in these days. Like most of us in the lost decade we have been trying to do the right things to get hired but the equation for getting hired has changed. I took another position to get another type rating (something bigger than a regional jet) for the purpose of experience and show I'm worthy. No bites, just crickets. So, reason for my interest in C5 with the better equation of getting a UAL interview.

A bit concern of sitting two years reserve as PIC out on east coast, while commuting from Midwest area. On top of that, I'm approaching my mid-forties (can't believe I'm saying that) and having a family, it is also another huge sacrifice I have to decide on. How exactly does the commuter clause work at C5? It's a bit wide open from the little I've read.

Anyone have insight on PIC reserve schedules, days off, guarantee days in a row, LCR/SCR/RRV?

Thank you :-):)

JediCheese
10-16-2018, 06:52 PM
How exactly does the commuter clause work at C5? It's a bit wide open from the little I've read.

Anyone have insight on PIC reserve schedules, days off, guarantee days in a row, LCR/SCR/RRV?

Thank you :-):)
You need 2 flights with open seats 24 hours in advance. Call after the 1st missed flight. The company can either PS you out (if they want) or you get to your base/trip yourself.

When using the commuter clause, if you miss segments you don't get paid for those segments and can go below min guarantee. No limits on amount of use.

I've found that with reserve you can choose the days off you want. You're getting 11 days off and if you don't put in preferences it will build you 6 day stretches with 2-3 days off in between.

No LCR. SCR is very rare, 90% of our reserve is airport standby. SCR is 12 hour shifts, 2 hour callout to airplane. Airport standby is 8 hour shift with 30 minutes to airplane from notification. With our bases, you can be just outside security for airport standby but the airport parking is likely slightly too far.

The Union is fighting airport standby language right now. Supposedly we're to call from the crew room when we report (or go through KCM before report) but our contract has none of that.

We also get 4 commuter rooms a month at the start or end of a trip. If you can get a line, it's possible to get by with those 4 rooms and only buy 1-2 rooms a month which is cheaper than a crash pad. Also can sometimes find another pilot to share a room with or make friends with someone in base who doesn't use any rooms.

JediCheese
10-16-2018, 07:06 PM
IMO, C5 is a great place to be to get your 1000 TPIC and move on. If you're 23 and just got 1,500 hrs without wife/kid and are willing to move, this is an amazing place to be. You could easily get on with United at 27 and then be set for life.

But if you've already gotten the 1,000 TPIC checkbox checked or want QoL (you are mid 40's and have wife/kids so likely QoL is high on your list), this is not a place to be. I know very few happy commuters with wife/kids except for a few that live in the NE and it's a short hop on us to EWR. CPP is something, but I wouldn't take a classdate here to try to only get a shot at an UAL hogan/interview. I've seen a ton of pilots try to hack it and it's a rough road with many quitting along the way.

If you're midwest, AW has good options out of ORD/MKE and they have CPP. Envoy has a large ORD operation and they were forcing upgrades to LGA/JFK so you could get back to ORD eventually and their flow is guaranteed.

TURF17
10-16-2018, 07:27 PM
IMO, C5 is a great place to be to get your 1000 TPIC and move on. If you're 23 and just got 1,500 hrs without wife/kid and are willing to move, this is an amazing place to be. You could easily get on with United at 27 and then be set for life.

But if you've already gotten the 1,000 TPIC checkbox checked or want QoL (you are mid 40's and have wife/kids so likely QoL is high on your list), this is not a place to be. I know very few happy commuters with wife/kids except for a few that live in the NE and it's a short hop on us to EWR. CPP is something, but I wouldn't take a classdate here to try to only get a shot at an UAL hogan/interview. I've seen a ton of pilots try to hack it and it's a rough road with many quitting along the way.

If you're midwest, AW has good options out of ORD/MKE and they have CPP. Envoy has a large ORD operation and they were forcing upgrades to LGA/JFK so you could get back to ORD eventually and their flow is guaranteed.
Great insight. You are right on the QoL, I've done the regional reserve SIC and PIC many times and it is a bull loose in the streets. I have no desire to work at AA and already gave one of their regionals a few years, which I'm grateful for getting me back in the left seat in under a year. So, I guess it is a update and connections process I will have to continue. Keep flying something bigger than a regional and enjoy the ride.
Thanks again for your insight.

Freebreakfast11
10-16-2018, 07:41 PM
I appreciate the insight. Hard making decisions with the 121 climate we're in these days. Like most of us in the lost decade we have been trying to do the right things to get hired but the equation for getting hired has changed. I took another position to get another type rating (something bigger than a regional jet) for the purpose of experience and show I'm worthy. No bites, just crickets. So, reason for my interest in C5 with the better equation of getting a UAL interview.

A bit concern of sitting two years reserve as PIC out on east coast, while commuting from Midwest area. On top of that, I'm approaching my mid-forties (can't believe I'm saying that) and having a family, it is also another huge sacrifice I have to decide on. How exactly does the commuter clause work at C5? It's a bit wide open from the little I've read.

Anyone have insight on PIC reserve schedules, days off, guarantee days in a row, LCR/SCR/RRV?

Thank you :-):)
There really isn't much QOL on reserve. We have very few reserve rules, so expect reserve blocks to be uncommutable and be happy if they end up being commutable on one end. Its almost all 8-hour ready reserve at the airport, very little short call. If you're commuting from the midwest, there are plenty of better choices than C5. Since you value QOL my guess is you'd be searching for a different job after a few months on reserve.

njd1
10-16-2018, 08:11 PM
There really isn't much QOL on reserve. We have very few reserve rules, so expect reserve blocks to be uncommutable and be happy if they end up being commutable on one end. Its almost all 8-hour ready reserve at the airport, very little short call. If you're commuting from the midwest, there are plenty of better choices than C5. Since you value QOL my guess is you'd be searching for a different job after a few months on reserve.

I spoke to a recruiter this morning and asked about reserve. I told her that I heard they basically have no short call and most reserve is ready reserve. She countered by saying that they do short call and gave the pilot the option of a 12 hour RAP with short call or an 8 hour ready reserve shift. She said "many" pilots choose the ready reserve shift particularly if they have an arduous commute, and added that scheduling will "usually" give reserve pilots several hours notice if the plan is to have you take a trip.

She also said that current reserve time in EWR (my desired base) is less than 1 month. If that's remotely true it's a pretty short time. Of course if they are playing games and treating line holders like reserve guys and extending them, etc. that would suck.

Other info: she said there are now 370 pilots on property, up from the ~300 on the APC profile.

JediCheese
10-16-2018, 08:44 PM
I spoke to a recruiter this morning and asked about reserve. I told her that I heard they basically have no short call and most reserve is ready reserve. She countered by saying that they do short call and gave the pilot the option of a 12 hour RAP with short call or an 8 hour ready reserve shift. She said "many" pilots choose the ready reserve shift particularly if they have an arduous commute, and added that scheduling will "usually" give reserve pilots several hours notice if the plan is to have you take a trip.

She also said that current reserve time in EWR (my desired base) is less than 1 month. If that's remotely true it's a pretty short time. Of course if they are playing games and treating line holders like reserve guys and extending them, etc. that would suck.

Other info: she said there are now 370 pilots on property, up from the ~300 on the APC profile.

You can 'choose' whatever you want as a request but they assign you what they need regardless of what your choice is.

They do assign pilots short call when they're on a trip because the pilot has already been assigned their flying for the day. So it might be technically true they have most reserve pilots on short call. I've done a ton of reserve (live in base and pick up like reserve shifts at 200/300% like crazy) and have gotten short call exactly twice. I've not been used three times on reserve here.

EWR FOs are for the most part staffed (I wouldn't expect many extensions). Our whole FO situation has resolved but we might be slightly low on IAD FOs. EWR CAs are short staffed and reserve is as fast as you can get off CQF. Once there are ~10 captains below you and you are no longer CQF eligable, you're off reserve. IAD CA is extremely overstaffed, to the point where it's a 2+ years to get there.

EWR is a great place to be. Don't sit on reserve long, quick to get a line, fly a ton, upgrade in base, build that TPIC time, and get out. IAD is a little rougher as a FO and is a bad place to be as a junior CA.

I'll believe the 370 pilots on property when it's on the seniority list at the end of the month. Of course, I do have a company issued iPad so anything is possible.

HercDiver
10-17-2018, 05:33 AM
Does anyone know the numbers that UAL is pulling from to fill their classes?
With the other regionals, I would expect more being pulled into the pool due to the size of their pilot staff. Would it be fair to say that 70% of UAL new hires are coming from CPP/Flow agreements?

UAL is currently at 55% of new hires coming from the CPP. There is zero chance of going to UAL via the CPP prior to completing ALL of the CPP requirements. We have had 3 pilots in the CPP hires “off the streets” over the past 2 years. All of those pilots were former military pilots.

TURF17
10-17-2018, 06:50 AM
UAL is currently at 55% of new hires coming from the CPP. There is zero chance of going to UAL via the CPP prior to completing ALL of the CPP requirements. We have had 3 pilots in the CPP hires “off the streets” over the past 2 years. All of those pilots were former military pilots.
Much lower than I expected. I'm not military but mostly regional airline experience with a few PIC type ratings. Many senior people where I'm at now and their not going anywhere. Upgrade where I'm at is looking like two years but you'll be on reserve right now for at least four years. Just not interested in doing a lot more reserve though it's nothing compared to the regional reserve lifestyle.

njd1
10-17-2018, 10:19 AM
UAL is currently at 55% of new hires coming from the CPP. There is zero chance of going to UAL via the CPP prior to completing ALL of the CPP requirements. We have had 3 pilots in the CPP hires “off the streets” over the past 2 years. All of those pilots were former military pilots.

Where are you getting this data? The other thread points out there are several (3) pilots a month leaving via CPP. Or am I interpreting that incorrectly?

c402fr8er
10-17-2018, 10:22 AM
Where are you getting this data? The other thread points out there are several (3) pilots a month leaving via CPP. Or am I interpreting that incorrectly?

He is saying that we have had 3 pilots in the last two years leave for United OUTSIDE of the CPP.

As in, they didn't have to wait for their number in the CPP, but managed to get hired on their own.

njd1
10-17-2018, 12:44 PM
He is saying that we have had 3 pilots in the last two years leave for United OUTSIDE of the CPP.

As in, they didn't have to wait for their number in the CPP, but managed to get hired on their own.

Ah, ok. Got it.

United hasn't exactly been setting the world on fire in terms of hiring in general the last couple of years, so there's that. But I hear that's about to change. Maybe they'll start ramping up over the next few years and give both OTS and CPP hires a greater probability of being picked up.

TURF17
10-17-2018, 04:33 PM
There were 3 positions that went unfilled for CA upgrades for Nov.

Those 3 open spots are now filled with new hires that will go through the new hire training and sims as CA’s.

We are back to immediate upgrades when hired for November.


The December upgrade announcement states we are looking for six more upgrades in December. :cool:
So, back to this question above. Has the company started or have they ever hired DECs?



If on reserve, I was reading you can build your own schedule as long as it is within the confines of FAR117? How many days off between each tour of duty? Could one build a 5 on 3 off schedule or am I off on this with reserve life?


Are reserve guys flying most days, so at least with commuters it wouldn't drain the paycheck to much i.e. overnights out of base?


Do you start getting your 4 hotel nights for commuters even while on reserve status?


What's are some gripes about being based out of EWR other than density of traffic and GDP? GDPs remind me of my days working in and out of ORD - just part of the whole animal in the NE corridor.


Thanks guys for the insight :-):)

v1valarob
10-17-2018, 06:35 PM
So, back to this question above. Has the company started or have they ever hired DECs?

There is no language in our contract for DECs. Everyone will be hired as an FO and then once your on property you can bid for CA.

If on reserve, I was reading you can build your own schedule as long as it is within the confines of FAR117? How many days off between each tour of duty? Could one build a 5 on 3 off schedule or am I off on this with reserve life?

I dont know where you read this, but if you're hired and awarded CA right away then youll never be senior enough to build your own schedule. Best case is that youll be able to hold a line and youll essentially get whatever is given to you as long as you dont bid your way out of a line.


Are reserve guys flying most days, so at least with commuters it wouldn't drain the paycheck to much i.e. overnights out of base?

Considering I wake up to an email almost every morning offering 200% for CAs and FOs then I'd assume most reserve people arent sitting around.


Do you start getting your 4 hotel nights for commuters even while on reserve status?

Yes. However they interpret the LOA to mean that you can get a hotel the night before your string of reserve days starts and then a hotel the night that you finish reserve. Not in-between.


What's are some gripes about being based out of EWR other than density of traffic and GDP? GDPs remind me of my days working in and out of ORD - just part of the whole animal in the NE corridor.

GDPS GDPS GDPS. However United is slowly moving the flying down to Dulles, which should help.


Thanks guys for the insight :-):)

Filler, lots of filler.

c402fr8er
10-18-2018, 12:14 AM
If on reserve, I was reading you can build your own schedule as long as it is within the confines of FAR117? How many days off between each tour of duty? Could one build a 5 on 3 off schedule or am I off on this with reserve life?




Most of what you've asked has been answered already.


We use PBS. When on reserve, you bid for days off, and that's it. You get 11 off a month. How long before you can actually hold the days off you want is anyone's guess if you upgrade off the street. That will depend on how long it takes for people junior to you to hit the line, and what days off you want, relative to everyone else in your base, and how well staffed we are.

Its a small airline, its entirely possible that your seniority could be enough to be junior line holder at one base and junior reserve at another.

There was a time that upgrades off the street had lines almost immediately. And the last group of captains that upgraded out of indoc have been on reserve since they hit the line in summer of 2017. I know at least one individual who will be going to United in the next few months who will have been on reserve their entire time here.


Best anyone can say is, your experience will be somewhere in-between those extremes. If you've been in this business long enough to have the experience to upgrade, you've been around long enough to know asking for predictions about future movement is a guessing game at best.

TURF17
10-18-2018, 04:39 AM
Most of what you've asked has been answered already.


We use PBS. When on reserve, you bid for days off, and that's it. You get 11 off a month. How long before you can actually hold the days off you want is anyone's guess if you upgrade off the street. That will depend on how long it takes for people junior to you to hit the line, and what days off you want, relative to everyone else in your base, and how well staffed we are.

Its a small airline, its entirely possible that your seniority could be enough to be junior line holder at one base and junior reserve at another.

There was a time that upgrades off the street had lines almost immediately. And the last group of captains that upgraded out of indoc have been on reserve since they hit the line in summer of 2017. I know at least one individual who will be going to United in the next few months who will have been on reserve their entire time here.


Best anyone can say is, your experience will be somewhere in-between those extremes. If you've been in this business long enough to have the experience to upgrade, you've been around long enough to know asking for predictions about future movement is a guessing game at best.
Yes, I hear you on all you said hear. Never have used PBS but many pilots talk about it. Pretty much works well when you start to get some seniority is what it sounds like.

Those that have been pretty much DECs have you had any discussion with any of them about how their reserve schedules actually unfold from what they requested?
How easy is it to get to airport from crashpad w/o car? What about hotels that offer crew discounted rates? I've had a car in a base before but found it to be more of a hassle but then again it was an older car.

PosRateGearUp
10-18-2018, 05:15 AM
Yes, I hear you on all you said hear. Never have used PBS but many pilots talk about it. Pretty much works well when you start to get some seniority is what it sounds like.

Those that have been pretty much DECs have you had any discussion with any of them about how their reserve schedules actually unfold from what they requested?
How easy is it to get to airport from crashpad w/o car? What about hotels that offer crew discounted rates? I've had a car in a base before but found it to be more of a hassle but then again it was an older car.

I can appreciate you’re need for information because making a career move is a big deal. That being said, you’re asking the same question over and over again, just worded differently. NOBODY here can predict how you’re life on reserve will be!

Let’s say you get hired and upgrade in indoc which is very likely; you will be on reserve in either base right off the bat, you will most likely be CQF, and you will be most junior. The likelihood of you holding anything you want is nil. After that, it all depends on who is upgrading. If they continue to upgrade from indoc, you will get more relative seniority and possibly be able to hold your days off. If a number of guys get their time internally they will upgrade above you, and life will continue to suck. There’s no way of us predicting when a large number of internal upgrades will happen.

Life on reserve is typically 5-6 on, 2 off.
Yes you will likely fly everyday, but that does not guarantee an overnight. You may do a turn and be back in base.

There are Crashpads available in EWR that provide transportation in the range of $200-250 a month.

The only thing that can be said for sure is reserve is much longer in IAD than EWR. The captain who is going to UA via CPP having only been on reserve his entire time here is IAD based.

TURF17
10-18-2018, 05:37 AM
I can appreciate you’re need for information because making a career move is a big deal. That being said, you’re asking the same question over and over again, just worded differently. NOBODY here can predict how you’re life on reserve will be!

Let’s say you get hired and upgrade in indoc which is very likely; you will be on reserve in either base right off the bat, you will most likely be CQF, and you will be most junior. The likelihood of you holding anything you want is nil. After that, it all depends on who is upgrading. If they continue to upgrade from indoc, you will get more relative seniority and possibly be able to hold your days off. If a number of guys get their time internally they will upgrade above you, and life will continue to suck. There’s no way of us predicting when a large number of internal upgrades will happen.

Life on reserve is typically 5-6 on, 2 off.
Yes you will likely fly everyday, but that does not guarantee an overnight. You may do a turn and be back in base.

There are Crashpads available in EWR that provide transportation in the range of $200-250 a month.

The only thing that can be said for sure is reserve is much longer in IAD than EWR. The captain who is going to UA via CPP having only been on reserve his entire time here is IAD based.
Sorry for sounding like a broken record. I know what it will feels like as I've done the PIC reserve at the regionals more than once. One thing I haven't done is being CQF. Does the pay differ if flying as CQF? Basically one is getting right seat qualified and will be trained and check as such - right? How do they work this during checkride and IOE?

Thank you.

TURF17
10-18-2018, 05:40 AM
I can appreciate you’re need for information because making a career move is a big deal. That being said, you’re asking the same question over and over again, just worded differently. NOBODY here can predict how you’re life on reserve will be!

Let’s say you get hired and upgrade in indoc which is very likely; you will be on reserve in either base right off the bat, you will most likely be CQF, and you will be most junior. The likelihood of you holding anything you want is nil. After that, it all depends on who is upgrading. If they continue to upgrade from indoc, you will get more relative seniority and possibly be able to hold your days off. If a number of guys get their time internally they will upgrade above you, and life will continue to suck. There’s no way of us predicting when a large number of internal upgrades will happen.

Life on reserve is typically 5-6 on, 2 off.
Yes you will likely fly everyday, but that does not guarantee an overnight. You may do a turn and be back in base.

There are Crashpads available in EWR that provide transportation in the range of $200-250 a month.

The only thing that can be said for sure is reserve is much longer in IAD than EWR. The captain who is going to UA via CPP having only been on reserve his entire time here is IAD based.
What crashpads offer transportation other than a walk to the light rail or bus?

PosRateGearUp
10-18-2018, 05:46 AM
What crashpads offer transportation other than a walk to the light rail or bus?

Country Inn has hotel shuttle. Blocked Inn had transport when I stayed there, but their website has changed, so not sure.

HercDiver
10-18-2018, 03:32 PM
Where are you getting this data? The other thread points out there are several (3) pilots a month leaving via CPP. Or am I interpreting that incorrectly?

No, what I am saying is that XJT is offered 25% of a new hire class, CommutAir is offered 10%, Mesa and AWAC are also offered 10%. These numbers are in the CPP contracts and are published numbers. These are completely separate from the acceptance rate.



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