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CodyPilot
11-06-2018, 06:48 AM
Hello all,

I would like clarification and to know if anyone has came across this issue or done the same thing.

I do aerial survey and quite often I am mapping rural areas, flying 100NM or so to the survey area. I would stay in the air up to 7 hours some days, and return to the airport I departed from, and never logged as XC because I TO and landed at the same airport. Some days I would fly 1,200 miles.

Under 14 CFR 61.1(b)(3)(vi) I believe I can legally log this as XC time because I am 50nm or further, straight line distance from departing airport.

I think I have answered my own question here, I just want some reassurance from guys who have done this, and examiner completely fine with it. Leaving a link to the reg below.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-id...11&pd=20160829


JohnBurke
11-06-2018, 07:03 AM
Hello all,

I would like clarification and to know if anyone has came across this issue or done the same thing.

I do aerial survey and quite often I am mapping rural areas, flying 100NM or so to the survey area. I would stay in the air up to 7 hours some days, and return to the airport I departed from, and never logged as XC because I TO and landed at the same airport. Some days I would fly 1,200 miles.

Under 14 CFR 61.1(b)(3)(vi) I believe I can legally log this as XC time because I am 50nm or further, straight line distance from departing airport.

I think I have answered my own question here, I just want some reassurance from guys who have done this, and examiner completely fine with it. Leaving a link to the reg below.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-id...11&pd=20160829

For the purposes of meeting experience requirements of the ATP, you do not need to have a landing at a point more than 50 miles away from the point of departure. You only need to fly to a point in space that is a straight-line distance of 50 nm or more from the point of departure.

Your link doesn't work. However, 14 CFR 61.1 explains it clearly:

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=bdfe135a87a3c5a8c1b68a09ba9856a1&mc=true&node=se14.2.61_11&rgn=div8

Cross-country time meansó

(i) Except as provided in paragraphs (ii) through (vi) of this definition, time acquired during flightó


Notice that the relevant here exception is (vi), which applies to the ATP.


(vi) For the purpose of meeting the aeronautical experience requirements for an airline transport pilot certificate (except with a rotorcraft category rating), time acquired during a flightó

(A) Conducted in an appropriate aircraft;

(B) That is at least a straight-line distance of more than 50 nautical miles from the original point of departure; and

(C) That involves the use of dead reckoning, pilotage, electronic navigation aids, radio aids, or other navigation systems.

Notice that (vi) does not require a landing at a point other than the point of departure. This means that your experience, departing airport A, flying to a point more than 50 nm away, and eventually returning to the same airport, is cross country, so long as it was in flight and included the use of navigation systems.

Glasswing
11-06-2018, 05:20 PM
https://www.aopa.org/training-and-safety/learn-to-fly/logging-cross-country-time

AOPA's article makes it pretty easy to understand.




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