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View Full Version : Alpa drive?


Flogger
11-10-2018, 03:42 PM
So, what's the newest word on the ALPA drive?

Or was it all about that pay raise after all?


Gone Flying
11-10-2018, 03:48 PM
So, what's the newest word on the ALPA drive?

Or was it all about that pay raise after all?

seems to be radio silence from ALPA. Only good news is I keep seeing more ALPA lanyards & bag tags. If you have any advice on getting it going Im all ears

Check Complete
11-10-2018, 04:05 PM
Please let it happen!

I was on the phone a couple of weeks ago with RJ, might as well been talking to TTG.

A complete extension of management!


Nevjets
11-10-2018, 08:53 PM
https://www.skywestalpa.org/why-alpa

amcnd
11-11-2018, 08:43 AM
Seems to have fizzled out. Alpa drive always seems to coincide with a TA that comes out...

word302
11-11-2018, 10:43 AM
Seems to have fizzled out. Alpa drive always seems to coincide with a TA that comes out...

Nope. Still going strong.

Melit
11-11-2018, 11:17 AM
Nope. Still going strong.

Your going strong must be pretty weak if 4 people in this thread are wondering whats happening...:D

word302
11-11-2018, 11:36 AM
Your going strong must be pretty weak if 4 people in this thread are wondering whats happening...:D

Considering 2 of them don't work here and the third is amcnd and the fourth is seeing more and more lanyards, I'd say we're doing just fine.

Melit
11-11-2018, 11:44 AM
Considering 2 of them don't work here and the third is amcnd and the fourth is seeing more and more lanyards, I'd say we're doing just fine.

Don't forget the bag tags!! LMAO

word302
11-11-2018, 11:46 AM
Don't forget the bag tags!! LMAO

I suppose you think SAPA has the tools to get the job done? You continue to show how clueless you are.

Melit
11-11-2018, 11:47 AM
Considering 2 of them don't work here and the third is amcnd and the fourth is seeing more and more lanyards, I'd say we're doing just fine.

Honest question: Are you volunteering your time to keep it going strong?

word302
11-11-2018, 11:50 AM
Honest question: Are you volunteering your time to keep it going strong?

As much as I can.

Melit
11-11-2018, 12:08 PM
As much as I can.

Somehow I don't believe that..

word302
11-11-2018, 12:50 PM
Somehow I don't believe that..

What are you doing to improve this place besides running your mouth?

sn00p
11-11-2018, 03:28 PM
Nope. Still going strong.

It’s a welcome sight to see the bag tags, pens, and lanyards. :cool:

Melit
11-12-2018, 04:21 AM
What are you doing to improve this place besides running your mouth?

Don't be mad cuz you got called out...

word302
11-12-2018, 07:44 AM
Don't be mad cuz you got called out...

So nothing?

savedbythevnav
11-12-2018, 09:06 AM
Someone in management was asking me about the drive the other day. From what I understand, they don't like being left in the dark either because they know it's building steam slowly but surely. It's grassroots effort people--unless y'all know how to get everyone's email/phone number that is on the seniority list.

CBreezy
11-19-2018, 08:55 PM
Someone in management was asking me about the drive the other day. From what I understand, they don't like being left in the dark either because they know it's building steam slowly but surely. It's grassroots effort people--unless y'all know how to get everyone's email/phone number that is on the seniority list.

Management doesn't like not being in the know during a union drive? Shocking.

Turbosina
11-19-2018, 10:27 PM
I work here and maybe I'm missing something but I haven't seen a single lanyard, bag tag, nor have I heard anyone mention an alpa drive. If there is one, it's the stealthiest union drive I've ever seen...

word302
11-20-2018, 05:26 AM
I work here and maybe I'm missing something but I haven't seen a single lanyard, bag tag, nor have I heard anyone mention an alpa drive. If there is one, it's the stealthiest union drive I've ever seen...

Yet I had a super senior FO ask me if we were being paid to wear the lanyard because she is seeing them everywhere. I think you’re missing something.

amcnd
11-20-2018, 06:05 AM
I haven’t seen anything.. The last drive and alpa was everywhere, buying coffee, lunch, hanging out. this website and FB is the only place even mentioning it.. think its a “virtual reality “ drive..

Tippy
11-20-2018, 07:12 AM
Yet I had a super senior FO ask me if we were being paid to wear the lanyard because she is seeing them everywhere. I think you’re missing something.


I must be missing something too. I have not seen or heard anything on the line. Just here and FB. Heck even the FB page hasn't had a peep on it in over 2 weeks.

Melit
11-20-2018, 07:37 AM
I haven’t seen anything.. The last drive and alpa was everywhere, buying coffee, lunch, hanging out. this website and FB is the only place even mentioning it.. think its a “virtual reality “ drive..

Word302 is full of hot air...

amcnd
11-20-2018, 07:42 AM
Lots op people love to play “virtual reality” airline on here. Talking about union drives, mass firings, ect.. 90% whats on here is not reality.. or the information is obsolete within 2 weeks. Things change so fast now. Good time to be getting hired. Definitely not like it was 20 years ago..

Nevjets
11-21-2018, 08:09 AM
SAVE THE DATE FOR ALPA'S FATIGUE MANAGEMENT SEMINAR! JANUARY 23–24, 2019
Hosted by ALPA and Airlines for America on January 23–24, 2019, this fatigue management seminar, "FAR 117 Looking Back and Going Forward," will focus on the past five years of operating under FAR Part 117 and the best practices as we move ahead. The seminar provides a forum for pilots, airlines, and the FAA to discuss flight and duty time and will take place at ALPA's Conference Center in Herndon, Va. More details and registration information will be available in the near future.

Mercyful Fate
12-01-2018, 01:59 PM
SAVE THE DATE FOR ALPA'S FATIGUE MANAGEMENT SEMINAR! JANUARY 23–24, 2019
Hosted by ALPA and Airlines for America on January 23–24, 2019, this fatigue management seminar, "FAR 117 Looking Back and Going Forward," will focus on the past five years of operating under FAR Part 117 and the best practices as we move ahead. The seminar provides a forum for pilots, airlines, and the FAA to discuss flight and duty time and will take place at ALPA's Conference Center in Herndon, Va. More details and registration information will be available in the near future.




How much is ALPA paying you to be a sounding board?

Nevjets
12-05-2018, 04:51 PM
ALPA URGES FAA TO ACT QUICKLY ON OXYGEN MASK RULE
ALPA has forcefully advocated for many years for a revision to FAR Part 121.333(c)(3) concerning the supplemental use of oxygen masks. That regulation requires that "if for any reason at any time it is necessary for one pilot to leave his station at the controls of the airplane when operating at flight altitudes above flight level 250, the remaining pilot at the controls shall put on and use his oxygen mask until the other pilot has returned to his duty station." Per a 2009 ALPA white paper on this subject, the Association's view is that the regulation should be revised to replace "above flight level 250" with "above flight level 410."
Contained in the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018, which was signed into law October 5, 2018, is a provision (i.e., Sec. 579, Regulatory Streamlining) that requires the FAA to issue, within one year, a final rule to apply FAR 121.333(c)(3) to flight altitudes above FL 410. ALPA recently sent a letter to FAA Acting Administrator Dan Elwell calling on the agency to issue an interim rule without delay and a final rule as soon as practical thereafter.

ASO SUPPORTS ICAO CABIN SAFETY INITIATIVES
ALPA air safety representatives participated in International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) discussions in Montreal on November 27–30. ICAO's Cabin Safety Group (ICSG) reviewed proposed enhancements to cabin crew training documents to reflect the organization's current initiatives on competency-based training and assessment. ICAO is proposing the enhancements to further reduce accident and incident rates.
F/O Hannah Peavy (XJT), a member of the Aircraft Design and Operations group of the ALPA Air Safety Organization, along with an occupational health and safety specialist from ALPA's Engineering and Air Safety Department, serve as subject-matter experts to the ICSG. At last month's meeting, they and the members reviewed and discussed the proposed guidance. The ICSG also held a robust discussion on the development and implementation of digital learning, which includes training facilities and devices. ALPA's representatives supported enhanced training standards for all aviation personnel.

ALPA CO-LEADS RUNWAY SAFETY COUNCIL MEETING
On November 28, the FAA- and ALPA-cochaired Runway Safety Council (RSC) held its 41st quarterly meeting in Washington, D.C. The Council reviewed progress on ongoing projects, along with the 2015 FAA call-to-action items that are still in progress.
Air Traffic Organization Runway Safety Group manager Jim Fee, RSC cochair, presented details on the National Runway Safety Plan and addressed the need to provide wrong-surface events and "hot spot" information to all pilots, both for airlines and general aviation.
Capt. Steve Jangelis (DAL), ALPA Air Safety Organization Aviation Safety chair, serves as RSC's industry cochair. He pressed the Council to reduce the potential for pilot flash-blindness where LEDs on high-intensity runway lights are installed. "This is a major concern for virtually every pilot flying today and additional research is needed to better understand the risk associated with this issue," he said.
The next meeting of the RSC is scheduled for spring 2019.

LEARNING TO SOLVE PROBLEMS AT ALPA'S GRIEVANCE TRAINING SEMINAR
More than 30 pilot volunteers from 10 ALPA pilot groups convened in the Association's Herndon, Va., conference center last week for the Grievance Training Seminar, a two-day primer and refresher on dispute resolution.
Attendees ranged from longtime MEC volunteers looking to refresh their skills and share their expertise to those who are recent additions to their pilot group's Grievance Committees and received their first lesson on supporting their fellow pilots.
The seminar provided the basis for the grievance procedure under either the Canada Labour Code or Railway Labor Act and each pilot group's contract, then covered the wide range of jobs the volunteers will undertake, from reviewing and evaluating grievances to investigating disciplinary issues to assisting in the final stage of dispute resolution—often arbitration. Staff from ALPA's Representation Department—who are constantly available to support pilots and union volunteers—conducted presentations and led discussions, complemented by informative videos that showcased how to best support their colleagues.
"Fundamentally, what you're doing is solving problems," explained Betty Ginsburg, director of ALPA's Representation Department. "In many ways and at the earliest chance possible, your job is to solve problems . . . You're at the front line, and so our goal with the seminar is to give you everything you need to do your job effectively."
Look for more coverage in a future issue of Air Line Pilot magazine.

jtsastre
12-05-2018, 09:01 PM
ALPA URGES FAA TO ACT QUICKLY ON OXYGEN MASK RULE
ALPA has forcefully advocated for many years for a revision to FAR Part 121.333(c)(3) concerning the supplemental use of oxygen masks. That regulation requires that "if for any reason at any time it is necessary for one pilot to leave his station at the controls of the airplane when operating at flight altitudes above flight level 250, the remaining pilot at the controls shall put on and use his oxygen mask until the other pilot has returned to his duty station." Per a 2009 ALPA white paper on this subject, the Association's view is that the regulation should be revised to replace "above flight level 250" with "above flight level 410."
Contained in the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018, which was signed into law October 5, 2018, is a provision (i.e., Sec. 579, Regulatory Streamlining) that requires the FAA to issue, within one year, a final rule to apply FAR 121.333(c)(3) to flight altitudes above FL 410. ALPA recently sent a letter to FAA Acting Administrator Dan Elwell calling on the agency to issue an interim rule without delay and a final rule as soon as practical thereafter.

ASO SUPPORTS ICAO CABIN SAFETY INITIATIVES
ALPA air safety representatives participated in International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) discussions in Montreal on November 27–30. ICAO's Cabin Safety Group (ICSG) reviewed proposed enhancements to cabin crew training documents to reflect the organization's current initiatives on competency-based training and assessment. ICAO is proposing the enhancements to further reduce accident and incident rates.
F/O Hannah Peavy (XJT), a member of the Aircraft Design and Operations group of the ALPA Air Safety Organization, along with an occupational health and safety specialist from ALPA's Engineering and Air Safety Department, serve as subject-matter experts to the ICSG. At last month's meeting, they and the members reviewed and discussed the proposed guidance. The ICSG also held a robust discussion on the development and implementation of digital learning, which includes training facilities and devices. ALPA's representatives supported enhanced training standards for all aviation personnel.

ALPA CO-LEADS RUNWAY SAFETY COUNCIL MEETING
On November 28, the FAA- and ALPA-cochaired Runway Safety Council (RSC) held its 41st quarterly meeting in Washington, D.C. The Council reviewed progress on ongoing projects, along with the 2015 FAA call-to-action items that are still in progress.
Air Traffic Organization Runway Safety Group manager Jim Fee, RSC cochair, presented details on the National Runway Safety Plan and addressed the need to provide wrong-surface events and "hot spot" information to all pilots, both for airlines and general aviation.
Capt. Steve Jangelis (DAL), ALPA Air Safety Organization Aviation Safety chair, serves as RSC's industry cochair. He pressed the Council to reduce the potential for pilot flash-blindness where LEDs on high-intensity runway lights are installed. "This is a major concern for virtually every pilot flying today and additional research is needed to better understand the risk associated with this issue," he said.
The next meeting of the RSC is scheduled for spring 2019.

LEARNING TO SOLVE PROBLEMS AT ALPA'S GRIEVANCE TRAINING SEMINAR
More than 30 pilot volunteers from 10 ALPA pilot groups convened in the Association's Herndon, Va., conference center last week for the Grievance Training Seminar, a two-day primer and refresher on dispute resolution.
Attendees ranged from longtime MEC volunteers looking to refresh their skills and share their expertise to those who are recent additions to their pilot group's Grievance Committees and received their first lesson on supporting their fellow pilots.
The seminar provided the basis for the grievance procedure under either the Canada Labour Code or Railway Labor Act and each pilot group's contract, then covered the wide range of jobs the volunteers will undertake, from reviewing and evaluating grievances to investigating disciplinary issues to assisting in the final stage of dispute resolution—often arbitration. Staff from ALPA's Representation Department—who are constantly available to support pilots and union volunteers—conducted presentations and led discussions, complemented by informative videos that showcased how to best support their colleagues.
"Fundamentally, what you're doing is solving problems," explained Betty Ginsburg, director of ALPA's Representation Department. "In many ways and at the earliest chance possible, your job is to solve problems . . . You're at the front line, and so our goal with the seminar is to give you everything you need to do your job effectively."
Look for more coverage in a future issue of Air Line Pilot magazine.

As I tell my five-year-old who has just told me something similar: “yaaaaay.”

gojo
12-06-2018, 02:05 PM
As I tell my five-year-old who has just told me something similar: “yaaaaay.”

Sounds like you may be able to understand your 5 year old better. I can’t even tell you how many times I’ve read on a Skywest thread how ALPA doesn’t do anything for the industry. Someone provides information, and you get snarky. Just keep living in denial, and maybe you’ll feel better about not supporting it.

DarkSideMoon
12-06-2018, 02:56 PM
Sounds like you may be able to understand your 5 year old better. I can’t even tell you how many times I’ve read on a Skywest thread how ALPA doesn’t do anything for the industry. Someone provides information, and you get snarky. Just keep living in denial, and maybe you’ll feel better about not supporting it.

To be fair, nothing they’re doing in that email is particularly groundbreaking or important. I’m still pro union but alpa encouraging the FAA to move faster on rewriting an oxygen mask rule that is basically a minor inconvenience at worst isn’t something I particularly care about.

Melit
12-06-2018, 03:12 PM
Sounds like you may be able to understand your 5 year old better. I can’t even tell you how many times I’ve read on a Skywest thread how ALPA doesn’t do anything for the industry. Someone provides information, and you get snarky. Just keep living in denial, and maybe you’ll feel better about not supporting it.

But they have lanyards and stickerzzzzz....

Nevjets
12-07-2018, 01:37 PM
To be fair, nothing they’re doing in that email is particularly groundbreaking or important. I’m still pro union but alpa encouraging the FAA to move faster on rewriting an oxygen mask rule that is basically a minor inconvenience at worst isn’t something I particularly care about.


I’ve posted more than that email. And ALPA has been working on every pilots’ behalf on these kind of safety and security issues from day one. One good thing about ALPA is that if you something in particular you care about, ALPA already has a conduit for you to get in involved in a way that you can actually make a difference. Or if your issue is not on the forefront of ALPA, you can spearhead it and do something about it, again, in a way that can make a difference. For example, the whole fume event phenomena was being ignored. One spirit pilot took the reigns on that and now the latest FAA reauthorization has language in it to start dealing with this problem. It’s a whole lot harder to get legislation passed into law if you aren’t ALPA or are non-union.

TheFly
12-07-2018, 07:24 PM
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/frontier/118468-alpa-fails.html

Check Complete
12-07-2018, 08:47 PM
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/frontier/118468-alpa-fails.html

Your union is what you make it to be, if you want umbrella drinks on the beach without lifting a finger, go to an all inclusive resort.

But with SAPA we don’t have any option but what the company wants us to have.

By definition, we really have no real representation.

word302
12-08-2018, 02:50 AM
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/frontier/118468-alpa-fails.html

Huh. Sounds exactly like what happened here. Oh, except for the party where they get 40-something percent raises.

Melit
12-08-2018, 03:22 AM
Your union is what you make it to be, if you want umbrella drinks on the beach without lifting a finger, go to an all inclusive resort.

But with SAPA we don’t have any option but what the company wants us to have.

By definition, we really have no real representation.

You're a genius. Did you just realize that?

gojo
12-08-2018, 05:48 AM
You're a genius. Did you just realize that?

Hey genius, there’s plenty at Skywest that don’t realize that. He’s just trying to educate the geniuses that think the company bought SAPA is better

Melit
12-08-2018, 05:55 AM
Hey genius, there’s plenty at Skywest that don’t realize that. He’s just trying to educate the geniuses that think the company bought SAPA is better

Does he realize that most people don't read this foolish forum? Maybe he should parade around the crew rooms and spread the word..

rswitz
12-08-2018, 07:07 AM
I've maybe seen a lanyard in the last 6 months. Definitely nothing very apparent as far as a union drive. At least not in the real world away from these forums.

Melit
12-08-2018, 08:39 AM
I've maybe seen a lanyard in the last 6 months. Definitely nothing very apparent as far as a union drive. At least not in the real world away from these forums.

But Word302 said it was going strong?

gojo
12-08-2018, 09:16 AM
Does he realize that most people don't read this foolish forum? Maybe he should parade around the crew rooms and spread the word..

He’s probably shaking his head, as I am when we realize that people can’t research on their own before making foolish statements

Nevjets
12-09-2018, 11:21 AM
Being a non-union pilot group is like using the listing agent when buying a house. Or like using the your wife’s attorney to also represent you at divorce court. It just makes no economic sense. Sure, it’s going to cost you to pay for someone to represent YOUR best interests. But the alternative is to have the other party have someone represent their best interest while you have no one on your side.

Gone Flying
12-09-2018, 07:09 PM
Being a non-union pilot group is like using the listing agent when buying a house. Or like using the your wife’s attorney to also represent you at divorce court. It just makes no economic sense. Sure, it’s going to cost you to pay for someone to represent YOUR best interests. But the alternative is to have the other party have someone represent their best interest while you have no one on your side.

i like the ex wife analogy, thats probably the best way to explain something to an airline pilot 🤣🤣

Melit
12-10-2018, 05:29 AM
Being a non-union pilot group is like using the listing agent when buying a house. Or like using the your wife’s attorney to also represent you at divorce court. It just makes no economic sense. Sure, it’s going to cost you to pay for someone to represent YOUR best interests. But the alternative is to have the other party have someone represent their best interest while you have no one on your side.

Somebody like you NEEDS protection..Just in life, in general..

SuperDec95
12-10-2018, 07:00 AM
Being a non-union pilot group is like using the listing agent when buying a house.

That's called a 'transaction broker' under CO real estate law and it worked very nicely for me and it happens all the time. Sure there are lots of buyer brokers who will fall all over themselves to try and get in front of an impending deal for an easy payday, but they are not necessary if have an attorney review the contract.

So back on topic, once upon a time there were two ALPA pilot groups who were merging, one of them didn't like the arbitrator's seniority integration award, so they packed up their toys and went home...and decertified ALPA. The parched pilots from the desert said "can they really do that? WTF?" ALPA "blah blah blah blah, blah blah...blah."

I have 8 years of working for two ALPA carriers (even volunteered for some committee work) and have never seen a contract get done. Wore out the soles of my shoes walking up and down the sidewalks of Tempe carrying my sign. Contract 2000 pilotUNITY...still have the sticker on my bag.

Nevjets
12-10-2018, 09:01 AM
Somebody like you NEEDS protection..Just in life, in general..

Really? A personal attack? Is that all you have? Let’s just stick to the topic at hand. If you don’t have anything to say about the topic, please don’t make personal attacks instead. This isn’t grade school anymore. Okay?



That's called a 'transaction broker' under CO real estate law and it worked very nicely for me and it happens all the time. Sure there are lots of buyer brokers who will fall all over themselves to try and get in front of an impending deal for an easy payday, but they are not necessary if have an attorney review the contract.



So back on topic, once upon a time there were two ALPA pilot groups who were merging, one of them didn't like the arbitrator's seniority integration award, so they packed up their toys and went home...and decertified ALPA. The parched pilots from the desert said "can they really do that? WTF?" ALPA "blah blah blah blah, blah blah...blah."



I have 8 years of working for two ALPA carriers (even volunteered for some committee work) and have never seen a contract get done. Wore out the soles of my shoes walking up and down the sidewalks of Tempe carrying my sign. Contract 2000 pilotUNITY...still have the sticker on my bag.


I rather have a buyer’s agent. And that’s the point. Why use someone who isn’t LEGALLY required to have your best interests at heart? Nothing is perfect, obviously, but wouldn’t you rather have your own attorney instead of your wife’s? That’s all I’m saying. Having legal representation recognized as your bargaining agent by the NMB is better than having nothing.

rswitz
12-10-2018, 12:48 PM
But Word302 said it was going strong?

My apologies. I stand corrected...

Nevjets
12-13-2018, 03:34 PM
Because of the PAC’s education efforts, ALPA pilots saw major improvements in the five-year FAA Reauthorization bill that was recently signed into law, including:

• No changes to first officer qualifications and training
• No section 744 – the single pilot operations program
• UAS – Section 336 of the previous FAA authorization is being repealed and FAA will have the authority to properly regulate all UAS (including hobbyists)
• PHMSA is getting statutory direction for a public education campaign about the dangers of shipping undeclared hazmat
• Physically installed secondary barriers will be mandated on all newly manufactured aircraft – the FAA has 120 days to direct carriers to make this change
• ASAP reports are now going to be presumed accepted
• Oxygen masks – FAA is being directed to harmonize rules with ICAO to mandate masks at FL410
• FFDO firearms training will be harmonized with FAMS training to allow requalification training at FAMS training centers
• The HIMS program is being authorized for the first time which will streamline the funding process and strengthen the program
• Lithium battery regulations are being harmonized with ICAO regulations
• Our Women in Aviation bill was included to encourage young women to become pilots

In addition to fighting for priorities (first officer qualifications, two pilots in the cockpit, etc.), the PAC fought against things that would hurt pilots’ careers, including:

• Uber Air
• Cabotage exemption for Puerto Rico
• Foreign ownership and control changes (Brat bill)
• Additional mental health screening requirements
• Negative labor law changes, i.e. excluding flight crews from state kincare and other laws

Nevjets
12-18-2018, 08:33 PM
It's been an honor.
As ALPA's 10th president, I feel deeply honored to have been democratically elected to lead our union. But the democratic process did not stop when the vote count was tallied four years ago. Nor can it stop with the election that will usher in ALPA's newest slate of national officers on January 1.
For our union, unless our democracy endures beyond our Board of Directors election to also take form in our daily efforts, we will not achieve the potential of our ideals. Every cooperative movement begins with an individual act. Each time an ALPA member answers the call to action, our union takes another step forward in forging a stronger future for our industry and our profession.
Driven by ALPA members' unyielding conviction, our union has delivered tremendous results during the past four years. Thanks to your commitment, our contracts are getting stronger with each negotiation—including the Frontier pilot group's recent tentative agreement. The Frontier pilots should know how proud I feel of their work to reach an agreement that, if ratified, will provide significant improvements in pay, work rules, retirement, and benefits. It will also provide a ratification bonus to recognize the two and a half years the pilots worked under the industry's only remaining bankruptcy-era contract. The Frontier pilots have lifted the entire profession.
Our union members' resolve to work together has only grown stronger as our industry evolves with time and our companies are acquired and merged. For example, yesterday I convened the new Alaska MEC for the first time. The premerger Alaska and Virgin America pilots have elected their leaders as a single MEC and are very well positioned for success. The culmination of nearly three years of difficult and dedicated work by the leaders of both pilot groups, the Alaska-Virgin pilot merger embodied transparency, communication, and unity.
ALPA pilots' unity and action also helped ensure that the U.S.-UK bilateral agreement reflects the ALPA pilots' goals of preserving continuity during a Brexit transition, maintains existing European ownership of UK carriers, and includes traditional provisions to ensure that U.S. airlines and their pilots have a fair opportunity to compete internationally.
Other airline pilots see this record of accomplishment and want to become part of it. That's why we're succeeding so clearly in our mission to represent all U.S. and Canadian airline pilots. Since 2015, our organizing and growth has resulted in adding more than 10,000 members to our ranks, including the 300 Sky Regional pilots we've just welcomed to our union.
In 2018, ALPA members raised our collective voice in the corridors of Congress and sent our message in more than 100,000 e-mails, letters, and visits to lawmakers urging them to hold the line on safety. This, along with ALPA pilots' social media posts, shattered every ALPA advocacy engagement record.
Because of ALPA pilots' determination, we beat back antisafety measures and took tremendous steps forward in advancing our pilot-partisan agenda with the newly enacted, five-year FAA reauthorization bill. Thanks to you, the FAA reauthorization kept pilot training, qualification, and experience requirements strong and two fully qualified pilots in the cockpit of every passenger and cargo aircraft. At the same time, the bill also advances safety, security, and pilot assistance and promotes the future of the piloting profession.
In major progress in Canada, ALPA pilots' dedication secured the long-overdue release of updated science-based flight- and duty-time regulations. Transport Canada's announcement brought Canadian regulations in line with the rest of the world and improved safety for passengers and crews alike. All U.S. and Canadian pilots owe a debt of gratitude to the ALPA leadership in Canada for bringing these regulations to completion. Well done!
Whether you've served our union as an MEC chairman, a local council rep, an Air Safety Organization volunteer, a pilot ambassador at a school, a Call-to-Action supporter, or ALPA-PAC contributor, your commitment is what powers ALPA.
ALPA's democratic process performs unfailingly now, as it has for nearly 90 years. Our union's new slate of national officers begins its work with a strong strategic plan that will do even more to achieve our members' goals in an ever-challenging global industry.
Thank you for making possible four years of incredible progress in our contracts, our safety, and our profession.

Nevjets
12-21-2018, 05:22 PM
ANOTHER ALPA ADVOCACY WIN: FAA LAUNCHES NEW HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY PROGRAM
Hazardous materials (liquids, flammables, and other materials) shipped as cargo without being identified by the shipper are considered "undeclared" hazardous materials. There are no official estimates of what percent of parcel shipments contain undisclosed hazardous materials; however, the DOT tracks reported incidents where hazardous materials shipments create safety hazards for various reasons, such as a leaking package or other type of external evidence that the package is a safety concern. In 2017, the FAA received 1,082 reports of such events, and 479 of the incidents involved undeclared hazardous materials.
ALPA has been advocating very closely with the FAA and PHMSA to increase shippers' knowledge of hazmat and reduce (and ultimately eliminate) shipments of undeclared hazardous materials. With airline passengers, shippers, and air carriers in mind, the FAA has recently launched their Hazardous Materials Safety Program, which includes a redesigned website.

NEED HELP? PILOT PEER SUPPORT IS NOW ALPA-WIDE!
Don't let stress affect your livelihood! Talk confidentially to your Pilot Peer Support (PPS) peer before life's stresses threaten your medical, your certificate, your career, and your life.
Peers are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week:
Delta pilots: Call Delta PAN at
FedEx pilots: Call FedEx PATH at
United pilots: Call UAL SOAR at
Canadian pilots: Visit your MEC website
All other ALPA pilots: Call Pilot Peer Support at
Calls are confidential. For more details about the program, read our article in the December 2018 issue of Air Line Pilot magazine, and visit us online at alpa.org/pps.
If you are interested in becoming a PPS volunteer, please e-mail us.
ALPA/A4A FATIGUE MANAGEMENT SEMINAR JANUARY 23–24—REGISTER TODAY!
Registration is now open for next month's Fatigue Management Seminar: FAR 117 Looking Back and Going Forward. Cohosted by ALPA and A4A at ALPA's offices in Herndon, Va., on January 23–24, 2019, this seminar will provide a forum for pilots, airline management, and the FAA to discuss fatigue risk management plans, flight-duty period extensions, and fitness-for-duty issues that have arisen with Part 117 implementation. It will also identify a path forward to effectively address these elements of pilot fatigue.
To secure a hotel room, you must register by January 3, 2019.
We look forward to seeing you there! If have any questions, please contact ALPA's Legal Department

Nevjets
01-04-2019, 02:38 PM
FAA HOSTS WRONG-SURFACE LANDING MEETINGS AT PHL, BNA
The FAA's Runway Safety Action Team, which is co-chaired by Capt. Steve Jangelis (DAL), ALPA's Aviation Safety chair, has scheduled two special-focus meetings this month, which are open to the piloting community, regarding wrong-surface events. The first will be held at Philadelphia International Airport (PHL) on January 9 and the second at Nashville International Airport (BNA) on January 30. The FAA encourages all pilots who are based at or frequent these airports to attend. Representatives from ALPA's Air Safety Organization are planning to attend both meetings.
The purpose of the meetings is to discuss factors that contributed to recent wrong-surface events, including attempted wrong-surface arrivals and departures. Airport stakeholders and pilots are invited to engage in discussions to assess current mitigation strategies and to assist with recommendations and solutions to enhance surface safety at these airports.
Anyone who wishes to attend the PHL meeting should RSVP as soon as possible to [email protected] To attend the BNA meeting, please RSVP by January 21 to [email protected]

Nevjets
01-09-2019, 04:53 PM
ANNOUNCING ALPA'S PILOT CAREER DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVE

On his first day in office, ALPA President Joe DePete brought together pilots and staff to begin planning what promises to be one of our union's flagship events for 2019—a summit to be held during the first part of the year called the "Pilot Career Development Initiative: From Recruitment to Retirement."
In anticipation of taking office on January 1, ALPA's president directed members of his transition team to reach out during the month of December to all ALPA MEC leaders to determine their pilots' top five concerns, so that the new administration would hit the ground running in 2019. ALPA's incoming leadership team found that pilots seek solutions to a multitude of problems that all fit into the broader category of the piloting career—issues such as attracting the next generation of pilots, career progression, and retirement. From this, the ALPA Pilot Career Development Initiative was born.
Feedback from ALPA's MECs continues to come in, and Capt. DePete and his administration look forward to ongoing input from the union's members.


ATLANTIC SOUTHEAST'S FINAL DEPARTURE

ALPA carrier Atlantic Southeast Airlines (ASA) reached a peak of success in 2013 with 1,860 fellow pilots. However, shifts in supply and demand across various markets resulted in the end of contract agreements between ASA and the mainline carriers under which it operated.
On January 9, ASA pilots will fly the regional's final flight under the American Eagle brand. In late November, ASA operated a final flight for Delta.
The good news is that, thanks to preferential hiring agreements initiated by ALPA, 123 former ASA pilots have been hired at Kalitta; 61 of those 123 pilots are on the line, and the remainder are scheduled to begin training in 2019. In addition, 268 former ASA pilots have been hired at/transferred to ExpressJet in 2018.
With approximately 4,716 former or current ASA pilots flying—many at other ALPA carriers—we recognize the contributions these fellow aviators have made to our Association and our profession.

TheFly
01-11-2019, 01:59 PM
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/skywest/119195-training-issues-skw-4.html

bronc
01-12-2019, 02:53 AM
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/skywest/119195-training-issues-skw-4.html

Isnt it amazing how the tone changed around here after that new pay deal they get, which they only got due to unionized competitors' contracts?

Check Complete
01-12-2019, 02:01 PM
Isnt it amazing how the tone changed around here after that new pay deal they get, which they only got due to unionized competitors' contracts?

We have been riding on the merits of ALPA carriers since day one! We get what other airlines have with a 3 to 5 year lag and only when it matters to bring in new pilots.

Embarrassed to say the least......


Note: this message will be sharply met with harsh words and denial from amcnd and Skyhawk121, their word is final, thanks.

word302
01-12-2019, 02:45 PM
Isnt it amazing how the tone changed around here after that new pay deal they get, which they only got due to unionized competitors' contracts?

Nah. The drive is alive and well. Should be heading into the next step shortly.

Mesabah
01-12-2019, 02:56 PM
It's time for you guys to organize, with XJT sold, you now stand alone, and as the largest regional; Yet smaller airlines have way better pay, benefits, and career progression.

It doesn't even have to be ALPA, anything is better at this point.

savedbythevnav
01-12-2019, 06:45 PM
It's time for you guys to organize, with XJT sold, you now stand alone, and as the largest regional; Yet smaller airlines have way better pay, benefits, and career progression.

It doesn't even have to be ALPA, anything is better at this point.

The positive thing is that a lot of people here probably agree. The logistics involved in getting contact info for ~5000 pilots are obviously complicated, however.

I hope we can successfully organize this group. It would be a win for our entire profession.

DarkSideMoon
01-12-2019, 08:41 PM
The positive thing is that a lot of people here probably agree. The logistics involved in getting contact info for ~5000 pilots are obviously complicated, however.

I hope we can successfully organize this group. It would be a win for our entire profession.

Couldn’t you guys just search the FAA airmen registry for everyone with a current first class medical and a CRJ/ERJ type rating? There has to be a decent way to do that, as soon as I got my ratings I got blasted with pilot spam so there has to be some way to scrape that data easily.

Sure you’d get a lot of other regional pilots with that net but you’d also hit everyone at SkyWest. Maybe you could also get seniority lists from other carriers and remove those names off the list as well, leaving you with mostly SkyWest pilots.

Claxstarr
01-13-2019, 03:59 AM
Couldn’t you guys just search the FAA airmen registry for everyone with a current first class medical and a CRJ/ERJ type rating? There has to be a decent way to do that, as soon as I got my ratings I got blasted with pilot spam so there has to be some way to scrape that data easily.

Sure you’d get a lot of other regional pilots with that net but you’d also hit everyone at SkyWest. Maybe you could also get seniority lists from other carriers and remove those names off the list as well, leaving you with mostly SkyWest pilots.

You must have been a data miner in a past career, that's exactly how I would do it too. It really wouldn't be too hard with the once you have the lists.

ninerdriver
01-13-2019, 04:55 AM
Couldn’t you guys just search the FAA airmen registry for everyone with a current first class medical and a CRJ/ERJ type rating? There has to be a decent way to do that, as soon as I got my ratings I got blasted with pilot spam so there has to be some way to scrape that data easily.

Sure you’d get a lot of other regional pilots with that net but you’d also hit everyone at SkyWest. Maybe you could also get seniority lists from other carriers and remove those names off the list as well, leaving you with mostly SkyWest pilots.

That'll only work for pilots who don't make their addresses private.

DarkSideMoon
01-13-2019, 01:25 PM
That'll only work for pilots who don't make their addresses private.

Sure, but it’s a start. Would you rather hit 70% of the pilot group or 0% of the pilot group?

savedbythevnav
01-14-2019, 03:36 PM
Couldn’t you guys just search the FAA airmen registry for everyone with a current first class medical and a CRJ/ERJ type rating? There has to be a decent way to do that, as soon as I got my ratings I got blasted with pilot spam so there has to be some way to scrape that data easily.

Sure you’d get a lot of other regional pilots with that net but you’d also hit everyone at SkyWest. Maybe you could also get seniority lists from other carriers and remove those names off the list as well, leaving you with mostly SkyWest pilots.

We did this. A letter is going out within the next month or so to all the addresses collected. National is fronting the bill on everything now.

savedbythevnav
01-14-2019, 03:36 PM
That'll only work for pilots who don't make their addresses private.

Correct. It did yield about 3/4 of the pilot groups information still.

DarkSideMoon
01-14-2019, 08:00 PM
We did this. A letter is going out within the next month or so to all the addresses collected. National is fronting the bill on everything now.

Nice. Glad that database was useful to someone!

Nevjets
01-16-2019, 02:14 PM
SECURITY OF MOBILE DEVICE CHARGING SOURCES

In a recent ALPA security report, a crewmember reported leaving a downtown Chicago layover via Lyft, whereby the driver offered a USB cable to the pilot to charge his mobile device. Further examination revealed the cable was plugged into a small computer-like device, whereupon the pilot rejected the driver's offer.
This incident highlights the risks associated with using charging cords for mobile devices in public settings, including electronic flight bags (EFBs) that may be attached to unknown devices in public areas. In this case, the Lyft driver may have been trying to obtain data from the pilot's mobile device. Charging stations are commonly found in airports and other public areas.
ALPA recommends: Best practice dictates that "charge only" cords and power adapters provided with the device by the manufacturer and/or company should be used. The integrity of your company-issued EFBs and personal mobile devices, and the data that reside within these units, must be protected from physical intrusions in the public domain.


CABIN AIR QUALITY MEETING: FEBRUARY 25

A one-day Cabin Air Quality meeting, hosted by the ALPA Air Safety Organization and Engineering and Air Safety Department, will take place on February 25 in the conference center at ALPA's offices in Herndon, Va. This event will facilitate information sharing about ongoing air quality activities at both the international ALPA level and the air carrier level. Discussions will include the medical, maintenance, and aircraft design aspects of the safety and health concerns around aircraft air quality. MEC participation is encouraged, and this meeting is for ALPA members only.

TheFly
01-16-2019, 10:40 PM
More bad news for Gojet.

A federal judge recently came down hard on Gojet after a jury determined Gojet had interfered with a Pilot's rights under the FMLA. Gojet terminated the pilot while he was on FMLA leave. The VP of Operations, Steve Briner, had announced his plan to terminate the pilot in an email shortly after the leave started and instructed Chief Pilot Randy Bratcher and base manager Tracey Ryan not to communicate with him by phone or email. They complied.

The judge awarded 376,000 in backpay and similar damages and also stated he would be awarding future damages. He requested more information on the difference between Gojet Captain pay and Skywest FO pay.

In Gojet's filing, they stated that an 11 year Gojet captain would earn $428,004 over the next 5 years and a 4th year Skywest FO who stays an FO, will earn $377,321 so that the difference will only be $50,683.

Breaking Gojet's numbers down to per month means, an 11 year Gojet Captain will make 844 less than a 4 year Skywest FO per month.

I wonder what the projected earnings of a Gojet new hire versus a Skywest new hire are?
Is GoJet an ALPA airline? What about Mesa?

rickair7777
01-17-2019, 08:12 AM
Is GoJet an ALPA airline? What about Mesa?

Mesa yes.
...........

Nevjets
01-23-2019, 04:58 PM
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PILOTS HOLDING SPECIAL ISSUANCE MEDICAL CERTIFICATES

Special issuance authorization (SIA) medical certificates require FAA aeromedical review before being reissued by the FAA or an aviation medical examiner (AME). The SIA letter directs the pilot to submit information to the FAA 60 days prior to the expiration. Although the government shutdown has slowed the FAA review timeline, SIAs are still being processed.
If you hold an SIA, you should obtain the required evaluations and documents 90 days before the expiration and ensure they are submitted to the FAA no later than 60 days prior to the SIA expiration date. You should not take a physical exam with your AME until the month your SIA expires (not 60–90 days prior).
Pilots with Conditions AMEs Can Issue medical certificates do not require review by the FAA and, with appropriate documentation, you can go to your AME at the normal time and be issued a medical certificate.
You can submit your renewal material though the ALPA Aeromedical Office (the Aviation Medicine Advisory Service, AMAS) or your AME. AMAS physicians can assist in submission, tracking, and renewal of pilot SIAs. For any questions or assistance, call AMAS


PILOTS AND INDUSTRY GATHER TO DISCUSS FATIGUE MANAGEMENT, DUTY RULES

Today, more than 100 pilots from 27 pilot groups met at ALPA's conference center in Herndon, Va., to discuss the implementation of flight-time and duty-time (FTDT) rules under FAR Part 117. Due to the ongoing partial government shutdown, representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were unable to attend.
Opening the two-day conference, ALPA president Capt. Joe DePete remarked that "pilot fatigue has always been a core issue for ALPA. When pilot pushing was commonplace, the safety risk faced by the first pilots is one of the reasons our union was founded. We have spent a lot of time and resources to see that the regulations are realistic in expectation and reasonable to line pilots."
ALPA FTDT Committee chairman Capt. Brian Noyes (UAL) observed, "We have adopted Part 117 pretty well as pilots in the five years since the rule became effective. Nearly all the issues have been worked out, with only a few letters of interpretation issued by the FAA—about six a year—but we can find new ways to improve our understanding and make the rules work better for pilots."
Panel discussions at the conference included identifying fatigue safety risks, mitigating those risks through data processing, a review of Part 117 implementation, reporting on extensions and fatigue calls, fitness for duty definitions, and best practices regarding fatigue risk management and systems.
Look for additional coverage in the March issue of Air Line Pilot.


CABIN AIR QUALITY MEETING: FEBRUARY 25

A one-day Cabin Air Quality meeting, hosted by the ALPA Air Safety Organization and Engineering and Air Safety Department, will take place on February 25 in the conference center at ALPA's offices in Herndon, Va. This event will facilitate information sharing about ongoing air quality activities at both the international ALPA level and the air carrier level. Discussions will include the medical, maintenance, and aircraft design aspects of the safety and health concerns around aircraft air quality. Each MEC is encouraged to send a rep, and this meeting is for ALPA members only.


INTERNATIONAL YOUTH EXCHANGE: A SUMMER PROGRAM FOR AIRLINE FAMILIES

International Youth Exchange matches your family with an airline family abroad so your teen can travel in the summer. The program connects teens ages 14 to 19 with a similar-aged teen from an airline family abroad, and each teen uses his or her family's flight privileges to travel. They spend two weeks together in each of their homes, for a total of four weeks. During the exchange, your son or daughter will have the opportunity to explore another country, learn about another culture and improve his or her foreign language skills from someone their same age.
The program costs $300 USD for the application fee, which is 100 percent refundable if a suitable match family is not found.

TheFly
01-23-2019, 07:38 PM
Nevjets, are you employed by SkyWest airlines?

Claxstarr
01-24-2019, 06:53 AM
Nevjets, are you employed by SkyWest airlines?

Well... he pretty much exclusively posts on SkyWest or SkyWest related threads, so if he's not, he's probably been tasked with converting the OO population.

I don't seem him posting these random ALPA 'updates' on any other airline threads.

Also amusing, 0 posts on the OO ALPA facebook group in the last month.

hawk21
01-24-2019, 07:31 AM
Someone is leaving ALPA business cards in 700s

jacburn
01-24-2019, 07:42 AM
Nevjets, are you employed by SkyWest airlines?

XJT ALPA rep.

Nevjets
01-24-2019, 08:22 AM
Nevjets, are you employed by SkyWest airlines?


No

Well... he pretty much exclusively posts on SkyWest or SkyWest related threads, so if he's not, he's probably been tasked with converting the OO population.

I don't seem him posting these random ALPA 'updates' on any other airline threads.

Also amusing, 0 posts on the OO ALPA facebook group in the last month.


I haven’t been tasked by anyone to do anything concerning Skywest or ALPA for that matter. I simply believe that Skywest being ALPA will help Skywest pilots and the piloting profession. And I truly believe that the best thing about ALPA is their safety, security, and pilot assistance advocacy. Which is why I’ve posted these ALPA updates that show some of the things ALPA pilots do on behalf of safety, security, and pilot assistance. All pilots have benefitted from what ALPA has done in safety advocacy. It would be great to get the talent that is within the Skywest pilot group to help out with safety, security, and pilot assistance.

XJT ALPA rep.


I’m no longer at xjt. I’ve been gone for more than a year. I’m over at Fedex now. And when I was at xjt, I was only a rep for about 18 months in 2007-2008 timeframe.

word302
01-24-2019, 08:22 AM
Well we are the only non-unionized airline in the US. Mailers will be going out shortly.

peepz
01-24-2019, 08:35 AM
Well we are the only non-unionized airline in the US. Mailers will be going out shortly.

Please tell me this is true.

TheFly
01-24-2019, 08:51 AM
No




I haven’t been tasked by anyone to do anything concerning Skywest or ALPA for that matter. I simply believe that Skywest being ALPA will help Skywest pilots and the piloting profession. And I truly believe that the best thing about ALPA is their safety, security, and pilot assistance advocacy. Which is why I’ve posted these ALPA updates that show some of the things ALPA pilots do on behalf of safety, security, and pilot assistance. All pilots have benefitted from what ALPA has done in safety advocacy. It would be great to get the talent that is within the Skywest pilot group to help out with safety, security, and pilot assistance.




I’m no longer at xjt. I’ve been gone for more than a year. I’m over at Fedex now. And when I was at xjt, I was only a rep for about 18 months in 2007-2008 timeframe.

Enjoy your new life at FedEx. No ALPA at Skw...if it ain’t broke don’t fix it.

word302
01-24-2019, 09:26 AM
Enjoy your new life at FedEx. No ALPA at Skw...if it ain’t broke don’t fix it.

It ain't broke? Did you read the latest and greatest from SAPA? Company trying to weasel out of more pay and SAPA just shrugs.

gojo
01-24-2019, 09:47 AM
Enjoy your new life at FedEx. No ALPA at Skw...if it ain’t broke don’t fix it.

Gulp gulp swallow

Nevjets
01-24-2019, 10:28 AM
Enjoy your new life at FedEx. No ALPA at Skw...if it ain’t broke don’t fix it.


Ok, I’ll go with that. Have you ever replaced something that wasn’t broken? Sometimes things might work for what you needed in the past but you replace anyway for something that works better for the future. It’s called obsolescence. It seems line sapa has long reached that point.

word302
01-24-2019, 12:09 PM
Ok, I’ll go with that. Have you ever replaced something that wasn’t broken? Sometimes things might work for what you needed in the past but you replace anyway for something that works better for the future. It’s called obsolescence. It seems line sapa has long reached that point.

They have...

deus ex machina
01-24-2019, 01:27 PM
They have...

It's hard when you have Stockholm Syndrome... you actually sympathize with your St. George oppressor...

trip
01-25-2019, 06:53 AM
What happened in SAPA anyway? That was kind of a weird development, you could almost make the case that it planned and executed that way so as to keep any outsider from getting in? Too much black helicopter?

majorpilot
01-25-2019, 07:44 AM
What happened in SAPA anyway? That was kind of a weird development, you could almost make the case that it planned and executed that way so as to keep any outsider from getting in? Too much black helicopter?


Remember, just because you’re actually paranoid doesn’t mean they’re not out to get you...in the interim, my tinfoil hat-making skills remain sharp.

JustSomePlt
01-25-2019, 09:50 AM
No




I haven’t been tasked by anyone to do anything concerning Skywest or ALPA for that matter. I simply believe that Skywest being ALPA will help Skywest pilots and the piloting profession. And I truly believe that the best thing about ALPA is their safety, security, and pilot assistance advocacy. Which is why I’ve posted these ALPA updates that show some of the things ALPA pilots do on behalf of safety, security, and pilot assistance. All pilots have benefitted from what ALPA has done in safety advocacy. It would be great to get the talent that is within the Skywest pilot group to help out with safety, security, and pilot assistance.




I’m no longer at xjt. I’ve been gone for more than a year. I’m over at Fedex now. And when I was at xjt, I was only a rep for about 18 months in 2007-2008 timeframe.

Come on now “Putz”, why are you always sticking your nose in other people’s business?

Check Complete
01-25-2019, 11:04 AM
Maybe the so called "Putz" would like to inspire nearly 5000 pilots to contribute to the profession rather than ride the coat tails of other pilots efforts. Gain some meaningful elements of a real contract and some true protections from management.

SAPA has lost a lot of ground in the last few years and still lacks any meaningful protection for it's pilots. Hopefully the new SAPA president can get back some of which we have lost but by design our (mis)representation is beholden to management and they only give what they want. Not for lack of trying but the company holds the leash.

Nevjets
01-25-2019, 11:07 AM
Come on now “Putz”, why are you always sticking your nose in other people’s business?


I’ve already explained. I do feel it’s my business. Like I said, I believe that there is a lot of talent within the Skywest pilot ranks that would contribute to the safety and security of the piloting profession if they were ALPA. This is precisely why I’ve been posting some of what ALPA does in safety/security. Pooling our resources would help. It’s not just Skywest, I feel the same way about AAL, SWA, UPS, etc. The only reason why we are not already all pulling in the same direction is probably because of some lame man-made (political) perception that hinders people working together.

thaddiusMbuggs
01-25-2019, 11:23 AM
Maybe the so called "Putz" would like to inspire nearly 5000 pilots to contribute to the profession rather than ride the coat tails of other pilots efforts. Gain some meaningful elements of a real contract and some true protections from management.

SAPA has lost a lot of ground in the last few years and still lacks any meaningful protection for it's pilots. Hopefully the new SAPA president can get back some of which we have lost but by design our (mis)representation is beholden to management and they only give what they want. Not for lack of trying but the company holds the leash.

Given the size and scope of the airline now (5000 pilots, around 450 airplanes, 20 domiciles) it truly boggles the mind we don't have proper representation. I have no doubt the SAPA reps do their best and are mostly a great bunch of guys but even a blind man can see the time has arrived for proper representation.

I often fly with the "I hate unions/I'm not paying dues for something I don't need" folks...I wonder how fast that attitude would change when they are on the other end of disciplinary action or possible termination and only have some line pilots politely asking the company to be nice?

ConnectionPilot
01-25-2019, 12:06 PM
Given the size and scope of the airline now (5000 pilots, around 450 airplanes, 20 domiciles) it truly boggles the mind we don't have proper representation. I have no doubt the SAPA reps do their best and are mostly a great bunch of guys but even a blind man can see the time has arrived for proper representation.

I often fly with the "I hate unions/I'm not paying dues for something I don't need" folks...I wonder how fast that attitude would change when they are on the other end of disciplinary action or possible termination and only have some line pilots politely asking the company to be nice?

It's different when you've flown for an ALPA carrier and living a much better life with better job security now than the ALPA carrier you worked for. It's tough to sell me on ALPA when they did absolutely no good for me. That DOES NOT mean I am not an advocate for ALPA in certain situations and airlines. They have their place.

gojo
01-25-2019, 12:12 PM
Come on now “Putz”, why are you always sticking your nose in other people’s business?

Maybe because of solidarity within the profession. Okay okay, I know it’s week. But that shouldn’t stop people from trying. Btw, nice 5th post. You got a year in yet?

peepz
01-25-2019, 01:47 PM
Maybe because of solidarity within the profession. Okay okay, I know it’s week. But that shouldn’t stop people from trying. Btw, nice 5th post. You got a year in yet?

Doubtful and he’s probably a old timer doing this for kicks and giggles.

JustSomePlt
01-25-2019, 07:04 PM
I wasn’t calling him a putz, I was calling him “Putz”. I’m sure he understands what I am getting at.

P.S.- I don’t work at for skywest. I’m sure Nevjets has some clue about my employment history though.

Nevjets
01-26-2019, 10:41 AM
Maybe because of solidarity within the profession. Okay okay, I know it’s week. But that shouldn’t stop people from trying. Btw, nice 5th post. You got a year in yet?


He created this username just to troll me. It’s ok, I don’t mind.

TheFly
01-30-2019, 04:42 AM
I hope that ALPA doesn’t come to SlyWest. There’s no regional that has shown financial, QOL or any real meaningful gains as a result. Take Mesa or even Great Lakes (rip) for example. The two most poorly compensated and managed airlines in this dispensation had ALPA. How were their pilot groups represented? Terribly!

TheFly
01-30-2019, 04:43 AM
Mesa yes.
...........

Mesa, an ALPA carrier. I rest my case.

DarkSideMoon
01-30-2019, 04:45 AM
Mesa, an ALPA carrier. I rest my case.

You know ALPA isn’t one union right? Just because Mesa ALPA might suck doesn’t mean Expressjet ALPA does.

TheFly
01-30-2019, 04:52 AM
You know ALPA isn’t one union right? Just because Mesa ALPA might suck doesn’t mean Expressjet ALPA does.

Both suck. ALPA can’t truly represent a subcontracting entity fairly.

word302
01-30-2019, 07:33 AM
I hope that ALPA doesn’t come to SlyWest. There’s no regional that has shown financial, QOL or any real meaningful gains as a result. Take Mesa or even Great Lakes (rip) for example. The two most poorly compensated and managed airlines in this dispensation had ALPA. How were their pilot groups represented? Terribly!

ALPA can't work magic for a poorly managed airline. Do you honestly think those carriers would have been better off without ALPA?

MiLa
01-30-2019, 08:23 AM
I’m a former SkyWester who is now at a mainline carrier and ALPA member. When I was at SkyWest (granted it has changed since I left in 2015) I had never worked for a union carrier and never felt that we needed a union. I felt overall we were treated fairly and pay was on par with our peers... After having worked for an ALPA carrier I realize that ALPA is so much more than negotiating pay. The vast medical, legal, safety benefits are more important in my mind that the pay rates that are negotiated. I’ve known many pilots who’ve had medical issues and every one of them has said that ALPA medical was worth every penny of dues spent and way more. That’s just one example. The safety programs are also extremely important. I know SKYW has adopted many of them but it was ALPA carriers that have lead the way on that front too...

word302
01-30-2019, 09:01 AM
I’m a former SkyWester who is now at a mainline carrier and ALPA member. When I was at SkyWest (granted it has changed since I left in 2015) I had never worked for a union carrier and never felt that we needed a union. I felt overall we were treated fairly and pay was on par with our peers... After having worked for an ALPA carrier I realize that ALPA is so much more than negotiating pay. The vast medical, legal, safety benefits are more important in my mind that the pay rates that are negotiated. I’ve known many pilots who’ve had medical issues and every one of them has said that ALPA medical was worth every penny of dues spent and way more. That’s just one example. The safety programs are also extremely important. I know SKYW has adopted many of them but it was ALPA carriers that have lead the way on that front too...

This.......times infinity.

Check Complete
01-30-2019, 09:41 AM
Talking with friends that have left SKW and have gone to ALPA carriers and SWAPA (SouthWest), all of them have mentioned they are very happy to have their union representation. The terminations alone would be worth it.

The new parking brake fiasco, which we can do nothing about, is going to be another cut in our pay. The company is already tracking individual Captains, and the CP's are discussing it with Captains when they have the opportunity. I had my chat a few days ago when I called in on something unrelated and was told my performance was pretty good but they want it to be zero. We do not have an enforceable contract, the company can do basically anything they want.

My friend at SouthWest said it's virtually impossible to get fired there unless you show up multiple times drunk. A SKW pilot was suspected of drinking before duty, the charges were eventually dropped by law enforcement but he was still terminated.

I'd vote yes the first chance I get.

Skyhawk121
01-30-2019, 09:46 AM
Talking with friends



Don't lie, you don't have friends.

DarkSideMoon
01-30-2019, 10:52 AM
Both suck. ALPA can’t truly represent a subcontracting entity fairly.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯. I don’t think the union at my airline is particularly effective but I also feel like I get my money’s worth from the dues just to have access to their aeromedical advice, FOQA/ASAP programs, and at least some recourse when the contract is violated, even if it takes ages for the grievance to be resolved.

A good union is no panacea for a bad company, but I’m happy with what I’m paying for for the most part. The RLA really neuters what we as a group can collectively do to fight a truly scummy company, but a good union paired with a good company helps everyone involved.

Check Complete
01-30-2019, 11:54 AM
Don't lie, you don't have friends.

Well, nothing like what you have with your cheer leading coach!

I've heard a super hot shower and you won't feel as dirty afterwards?

Just try and remember "No means No".....

sn00p
01-30-2019, 12:06 PM
Talking with friends that have left SKW and have gone to ALPA carriers and SWAPA (SouthWest), all of them have mentioned they are very happy to have their union representation. The terminations alone would be worth it.

The new parking brake fiasco, which we can do nothing about, is going to be another cut in our pay. The company is already tracking individual Captains, and the CP's are discussing it with Captains when they have the opportunity. I had my chat a few days ago when I called in on something unrelated and was told my performance was pretty good but they want it to be zero. We do not have an enforceable contract, the company can do basically anything they want.

My friend at SouthWest said it's virtually impossible to get fired there unless you show up multiple times drunk. A SKW pilot was suspected of drinking before duty, the charges were eventually dropped by law enforcement but he was still terminated.

I'd vote yes the first chance I get.

Now that’s messed.

savedbythevnav
01-30-2019, 12:22 PM
GG will tell you your latency whether or not you want to hear it. I love how he sent out the latency numbers for newly upgraded RSV CA's and suggested we call them

Such a stupid and unreasonable thing from a typically smart and reasonable guy.

Check Complete
01-30-2019, 12:38 PM
GG will tell you your latency whether or not you want to hear it. I love how he sent out the latency numbers for newly upgraded RSV CA's and suggested we call them

Such a stupid and unreasonable thing from a typically smart and reasonable guy.

So it goes back to would you rather face this with a real lawyer representing your interests or a SAPA rep on the phone that has been instructed to remain quiet?

And if we had a real enforceable contract with mutually agreed to and defined block out protocols , this wouldn’t be an issue in the first place.

Nevjets
01-30-2019, 01:38 PM
I hope that ALPA doesn’t come to SlyWest. There’s no regional that has shown financial, QOL or any real meaningful gains as a result. Take Mesa or even Great Lakes (rip) for example. The two most poorly compensated and managed airlines in this dispensation had ALPA. How were their pilot groups represented? Terribly!


I don’t believe that Great Lakes was ever ALPA. And do you honestly believe things would be better at Mesa if they didn’t ha e a union considering their ceo?

Nevjets
01-30-2019, 01:43 PM
The new parking brake fiasco, which we can do nothing about, is going to be another cut in our pay. The company is already tracking individual Captains, and the CP's are discussing it with Captains when they have the opportunity. I had my chat a few days ago when I called in on something unrelated and was told my performance was pretty good but they want it to be zero. We do not have an enforceable contract, the company can do basically anything they want.

GG will tell you your latency whether or not you want to hear it. I love how he sent out the latency numbers for newly upgraded RSV CA's and suggested we call them



Such a stupid and unreasonable thing from a typically smart and reasonable guy.


What’s this about parking brake and latency?

savedbythevnav
01-30-2019, 01:58 PM
So it goes back to would you rather face this with a real lawyer representing your interests or a SAPA rep on the phone that has been instructed to remain quiet?

And if we had a real enforceable contract with mutually agreed to and defined block out protocols , this wouldn’t be an issue in the first place.

Trust me, I'm the last guy you need to convince on having ALPA at SkyWest. Wearing that lanyard proudly and looking forward to seeing the mailer go out and push the drive forward.

savedbythevnav
01-30-2019, 02:00 PM
What’s this about parking brake and latency?

DL is mad about the time between brake release and wheel movement (i.e latency if you weren't familiar) and OO management is now tracking the latency of every Captain and "informing" them during "routine" meetings about their latency time and that it needs to decrease. This means CA's are not permitted to drop the brake for ANY reason until they are going to push immediately after dropping the brake.

No dropping per the FOM. No dropping for de-ice. No dropping because you want to be paid.

The ORD chief put names of low latency CA's in an email and told everyone to contact them for "tips" as if they don't know how to drop a brake or manage their airplane.

Nevjets
01-30-2019, 03:07 PM
DL is mad about the time between brake release and wheel movement (i.e latency if you weren't familiar) and OO management is now tracking the latency of every Captain and "informing" them during "routine" meetings about their latency time and that it needs to decrease. This means CA's are not permitted to drop the brake for ANY reason until they are going to push immediately after dropping the brake.

No dropping per the FOM. No dropping for de-ice. No dropping because you want to be paid.

The ORD chief put names of low latency CA's in an email and told everyone to contact them for "tips" as if they don't know how to drop a brake or manage their airplane.


Since this is the ALPA drive thread, I’ll just say how I think this would be handled if there was an actual NMB certified union. The reps would poll (formerly or informally) to find out the reason, if not already widely known. Then they would confer with management on how to deal with Delta’s (the customer) concern. And they would suggest ideas on how to lower latency. I don’t know, maybe it has something to do with getting paid historical block or better? If it is, then the reps could suggest going to a block or better as a good faith gesture to these obvious bad apples (sarcasm). Then management could do with that as they deem necessary. An honest and fair management would consider this especially since it’s industry average.

This way, you always have a dialog with the reps (who have legal authority to speak and act on behalf of all the pilots) and management when issues come up. Each airs their concerns and each come up with a mutual solution. Instead, what you have now is a management that uses coercion and intimidation against its pilots knowing they don’t have the protections of being represented by a union who would grieve and arbitrate any pilot discipline.

Legal representation, using contemporary issues as a means to incrementally improve the contract and solve problems in a mutual way, and of course the safety/security advocacy aspect of ALPA should make this a no brainer.

zondaracer
01-30-2019, 05:10 PM
The ORD chief put names of low latency CA's in an email and told everyone to contact them for "tips" as if they don't know how to drop a brake or manage their airplane.
Did you contact them and tell them to stop doing that?

DirkDiggler
01-30-2019, 09:07 PM
The ORD chief put names of low latency CA's in an email and told everyone to contact them for "tips" as if they don't know how to drop a brake or manage their airplane.

Wow, sounds like your company really wants a union drive to take place.

Nevjets
01-30-2019, 09:11 PM
PILOT PEER SUPPORT TRAINS HOUSTON-AREA REP

Twenty ALPA pilots from seven properties attended training this week at the ExpressJet Training Center in Houston, Tex., to become volunteers for the Association's Pilot Peer Support program (PPS). A new program conducted by the Aeromedical component of the union's Air Safety Organization (ASO) Pilot Assistance Group, PPS is a support network that connects ALPA members with trained pilot peers to talk about any personal or professional problems they may be experiencing. Peers listen and offer confidential, nonjudgmental support.
Training for the program included presentations and role-playing exercises, focusing on listening and communications skills, physical and mental health, resources available through the union, and ethical practices, culminating with an exam. F/O Ellen Brinks (DAL), ALPA's Aeromedical Committee chair, together with other ASO pilot representatives and subject-matter experts, offered instruction.
PPS volunteers are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

captive apple
01-30-2019, 09:13 PM
GG will tell you your latency whether or not you want to hear it.


How would you know that as an FO?

UND right?

TheFly
01-30-2019, 11:31 PM
And do you honestly believe things would be better at Mesa if they didn’t ha e a union considering their ceo?

Your words, not mine. I said ALPA representing regionals is a conflict of interest. The question is, has ALPA helped the likes of Mesa and others? The answer is flat out no. SkyWest is better managed, better paid and has a better work environment than many of our ALPA (regional) counterparts. That’s a fact.

gojo
01-31-2019, 03:49 AM
Your words, not mine. I said ALPA representing regionals is a conflict of interest. The question is, has ALPA helped the likes of Mesa and others? The answer is flat out no. SkyWest is better managed, better paid and has a better work environment than many of our ALPA (regional) counterparts. That’s a fact.

Quantify your facts then with examples. You do a lot of cheerleading without giving specific examples. And yes, ALPA helps every airline they’re affiliated with. The degree of success depends on the elected officials in each autonomous company. Much like your SAPA. And speaking of SAPA, now there’s a conflict of interest.

ninerdriver
01-31-2019, 05:17 AM
DL is mad about the time between brake release and wheel movement (i.e latency if you weren't familiar) and OO management is now tracking the latency of every Captain and "informing" them during "routine" meetings about their latency time and that it needs to decrease. This means CA's are not permitted to drop the brake for ANY reason until they are going to push immediately after dropping the brake.

No dropping per the FOM. No dropping for de-ice. No dropping because you want to be paid.

The ORD chief put names of low latency CA's in an email and told everyone to contact them for "tips" as if they don't know how to drop a brake or manage their airplane.

How this new DL latency push works at 9E as of this week:

1. We get an ACARS message at 120 seconds asking for the reason for the latency.
2. We send the reason.
3. Done.

flydiamond
01-31-2019, 05:24 AM
How this new DL latency push works at 9E as of this week:

1. We get an ACARS message at 120 seconds asking for the reason for the latency.
2. We send the reason.
3. Done.

And our union sent out an email asking us to write a pilot issue form if we receive any calls from the chief pilots office about latency for a possible grievance.

word302
01-31-2019, 08:15 AM
Your words, not mine. I said ALPA representing regionals is a conflict of interest. The question is, has ALPA helped the likes of Mesa and others? The answer is flat out no. SkyWest is better managed, better paid and has a better work environment than many of our ALPA (regional) counterparts. That’s a fact.

Lol. SAPA isn't a conflict of interest? Mesa absolutely is better off with ALPA. What are you basing these claims on. ALPA can't magically make a terribly ran airline industry leading. Skywest would thrive even better under ALPA.

savedbythevnav
01-31-2019, 08:16 AM
How would you know that as an FO?

UND right?

Because it's all I've heard from everyone I've flown with the past two weeks.

I fail to see your point.

Go Sioux.

savedbythevnav
01-31-2019, 08:19 AM
And our union sent out an email asking us to write a pilot issue form if we receive any calls from the chief pilots office about latency for a possible grievance.

At least your union is handling it. There's never a question about who's on your side.

We can't even say that much. SAPA stays quiet on everything. Representing anything other than the company isn't really their strong point.

FollowMe
01-31-2019, 08:26 AM
Control of an entity will always default to the body which provides its funds. In the case of SAPA that would be SKW Inc.

Joining ALPA would provide OO pilots access to a broader resource group (national programs, officers and support staff). But at a bare minimum SAPA should be member funded and wholly independent.

Nevjets
01-31-2019, 08:30 AM
Your words, not mine. I said ALPA representing regionals is a conflict of interest. The question is, has ALPA helped the likes of Mesa and others? The answer is flat out no. SkyWest is better managed, better paid and has a better work environment than many of our ALPA (regional) counterparts. That’s a fact.


I don’t really know what to say if you do actually believe Mesa pilots would’ve been better off without a union. What do you think things would be Iike for Skywest pilots if they had the same ceo Mesa has had? They would be worse off then Mesa.

As for conflict of interest, there is none. No mainline MEC can tell any regional MEC what to negotiate for and not regional MEC can tell any mainline MEC what to negotiate for. Each decides independently what they want to negotiate. I don’t blame you for this misconception. This is by for the worst thing that ALPA does, not explain how ALPA works, especially between regional and mainline MECs.

A true conflict of interest is SAPA. By definition, when the organization that is supposed to represent the best interest of the pilots is wholly funded by the entity that is opposed to the best interest of the pilots, you have a perfect example of conflict of interest in the SAPA/management relationship.

RAHkid94
01-31-2019, 10:40 AM
I don’t really know what to say if you do actually believe Mesa pilots would’ve been better off without a union. What do you think things would be Iike for Skywest pilots if they had the same ceo Mesa has had? They would be worse off then Mesa.

As for conflict of interest, there is none. No mainline MEC can tell any regional MEC what to negotiate for and not regional MEC can tell any mainline MEC what to negotiate for. Each decides independently what they want to negotiate. I don’t blame you for this misconception. This is by for the worst thing that ALPA does, not explain how ALPA works, especially between regional and mainline MECs.

A true conflict of interest is SAPA. By definition, when the organization that is supposed to represent the best interest of the pilots is wholly funded by the entity that is opposed to the best interest of the pilots, you have a perfect example of conflict of interest in the SAPA/management relationship.

If they’re truly independent, why were the only two pilot groups to fight back on the United JS grab SkyWest and Republic? Not a single UAX ALPA carrier even tried.

JustSomePlt
01-31-2019, 11:07 AM
If they’re truly independent, why were the only two pilot groups to fight back on the United JS grab SkyWest and Republic? Not a single UAX ALPA carrier even tried.

Seems like a solid argument if you ask me. Could it me that ALPA was leaning towards (or being leaned on to) not poke the UA bear because UA mainline pays so much more in dues than the ALPA UAX regionals?

ninerdriver
01-31-2019, 11:30 AM
Could it me that ALPA was leaning towards (or being leaned on to) not poke the UA bear because UA mainline pays so much more in dues than the ALPA UAX regionals?

Nah. ALPA MECs are very bureaucratic. They're slow. They'll start with an email to interested parties. Next, it'll go to the lawyers. There will be meetings. There might be a communication or two. Action comes later.

This is an advantage of SAPA. SAPA can work much more quickly to make decisions in SGU's favor for you.

So, why did SAPA move so quickly on the jumpseat issue, then? Well, if a bunch of OO pilots suddenly couldn't get to work on time, then that probably wouldn't benefit SGU much, right?

TheFly
01-31-2019, 02:46 PM
I don’t really know what to say if you do actually believe Mesa pilots would’ve been better off without a union. What do you think things would be Iike for Skywest pilots if they had the same ceo Mesa has had? They would be worse off then Mesa.

As for conflict of interest, there is none. No mainline MEC can tell any regional MEC what to negotiate for and not regional MEC can tell any mainline MEC what to negotiate for. Each decides independently what they want to negotiate. I don’t blame you for this misconception. This is by for the worst thing that ALPA does, not explain how ALPA works, especially between regional and mainline MECs.

A true conflict of interest is SAPA. By definition, when the organization that is supposed to represent the best interest of the pilots is wholly funded by the entity that is opposed to the best interest of the pilots, you have a perfect example of conflict of interest in the SAPA/management relationship.

Again, not a union, but ALPA. We can’t have the same entity representing us that thrives off us being cheap labor. ALPA just can’t give us what our mainline brethren get in compensation, benefits and outright respect. Why not? It’s because they have to keep subcontractor (regional) costs down, keep them competing against each other and at each other’s throats.

On the major or mainline airline level, ALPA is a totally different ballgame.

word302
01-31-2019, 03:44 PM
Again, not a union, but ALPA. We can’t have the same entity representing us that thrives off us being cheap labor. ALPA just can’t give us what our mainline brethren get in compensation, benefits and outright respect. Why not? It’s because they have to keep subcontractor (regional) costs down, keep them competing against each other and at each other’s throats.

On the major or mainline airline level, ALPA is a totally different ballgame.

Do you realize the irony in your statement? Currently we have a representative body bought and paid for by our own management representing us. You obviously have huge misunderstandings of how ALPA works if you think there would be a conflict of interest if we brought them on board. Nevermind that we would be the 4th largest carrier represented by ALPA. We would be the only carrier with "A" status along side Delta, United, and Fed Ex.

Nevjets
01-31-2019, 06:44 PM
Again, not a union, but ALPA. We can’t have the same entity representing us that thrives off us being cheap labor. ALPA just can’t give us what our mainline brethren get in compensation, benefits and outright respect. Why not? It’s because they have to keep subcontractor (regional) costs down, keep them competing against each other and at each other’s throats.



On the major or mainline airline level, ALPA is a totally different ballgame.



I don’t know how else to explain this to you so you can comprehend. But I’ll keep trying. Let’s say that the Skywest ALPA MEC has a negotiating goal of getting $150/hr for flying the 175. There is absolutely NOTHING that the delta or United MEC can say or do anything about it. Whatever the regional MEC negotiates and gets is up to what they and their management agree to. Again, no mainline MEC can prevent ANYTHING that regional MECs negotiate with their management.

The real conflict of interest lies in being represented by an organization that is WHOLLY funded by the management that does NOT have the pilots’ best interest in mind.

SteakSauce
02-01-2019, 07:15 PM
My two cents here personally speaking. ALPA is only as good as its elected officials... and lets be honest the current talent wouldn't be up to the task. Second everyone on here keeps saying that ALPA, if they ever make it past the door to the crew is going to magically fix everything. For those of you who thought SKW dragged out the last pay negotiation just wait till SGU throws a fit.. and see how long it takes them to negotiate with ALPA.

Also if ALPA is on property then EVERYONE has to follow the rules. Which is good an bad, Means crew support can't do whatever they want but also means that we are going to have a commuter clause, Which in my eyes isn't so great. Most clauses require you to try for at least 2 commutes, Lets be honest how many of you are willing to try the 5am flight to get to a min credit 4 day? when you can now easily say whoops missed my commute, now I got 4 days off to play Xbox.

Again I am not bashing a union by any means, but I think a lot of people think ALPA solves all the issues overnight.

ninerdriver
02-02-2019, 05:31 AM
Lets be honest how many of you are willing to try the 5am flight to get to a min credit 4 day? when you can now easily say whoops missed my commute, now I got 4 days off to play Xbox.

Quality career planning 101...

DarkSideMoon
02-02-2019, 06:06 AM
My two cents here personally speaking. ALPA is only as good as its elected officials... and lets be honest the current talent wouldn't be up to the task. Second everyone on here keeps saying that ALPA, if they ever make it past the door to the crew is going to magically fix everything. For those of you who thought SKW dragged out the last pay negotiation just wait till SGU throws a fit.. and see how long it takes them to negotiate with ALPA.

Also if ALPA is on property then EVERYONE has to follow the rules. Which is good an bad, Means crew support can't do whatever they want but also means that we are going to have a commuter clause, Which in my eyes isn't so great. Most clauses require you to try for at least 2 commutes, Lets be honest how many of you are willing to try the 5am flight to get to a min credit 4 day? when you can now easily say whoops missed my commute, now I got 4 days off to play Xbox.

Again I am not bashing a union by any means, but I think a lot of people think ALPA solves all the issues overnight.

And the company can take vague wording and say you’re violating the commuter clause because you should’ve known you weren’t going to get on that flight. A strongly worded commuter clause might be inconvenient for commuters but if you follow the letter of the law your company can’t arbitrarily decide you’re not making a good faith effort to get to work.

Check Complete
02-02-2019, 07:18 AM
My two cents here personally speaking. ALPA is only as good as its elected officials... and lets be honest the current talent wouldn't be up to the task.


To a degree you're correct. However, some of the reps in SAPA are very capable and have great talent. What's stopping them is the company. Management has SAPA right where they want them and since they fully pay for them, they get what they want. It's management's rules, no other way to look at it. Word is that the out going SAPA president, because he did his rightful duty to the company at the cost of his pilots, will soon be joining management himself. That's the control the company has over SAPA.

Think of SAPA as Tom Brady running out on the field, not with both hands tied behind his back, but with both arms amputated. Not much can happen.

Never more than now, we need real representation.

Nevjets
02-06-2019, 04:33 PM
EXPRESS CARRIERS EXAMINE UNITED CAREER PATH PROGRAM
Yesterday, the United MEC hosted a meeting for pilot leaders from ALPA's United Express carriers to discuss the United Career Path Program (CPP). This meeting was the first time all four of ALPA's UAX carriers have met with the UAL MEC leadership to collaborate on the progress and status of the CPP, which provides expedited interviews to pilots from UAL's ALPA FFD partners.
UAL MEC chairman Capt. Todd Insler led the meeting at the United MEC office in Rosemont, Ill., with pilot leaders from ExpressJet, Mesa Air Group, Air Wisconsin, and CommutAir.
First Officer Mike Hamilton, UAL executive vice president, provided an update on United's hiring forecast and reviewed the CPP interview process. He also provided a strategic view of United's CPP at Express carriers and universities. He then reviewed current results from an ongoing survey of ALPA pilots working at CPP carriers regarding their impression of the CPP.
Paul Karg, ALPA's lead economic and financial analyst, provided the latest industry overview with a focus on the fee-for-departure (FFD) market. F/O Lindsey Van Beusekom, ALPA FFD Committee chairman, led a discussion on the common negotiating positions between all UAX carriers, including deadhead deviation and reserve rules.

AIREON DEDICATES SATELLITE TO ALPA FOR PARTNERSHIP
Last week, Aireon CEO Don Thoma met with ALPA president Capt. Joe DePete to discuss the latest developments in the company's efforts to deploy a global satellite-based Automatic Dependent Surveillance- Broadcast (ADS-B) system. In a partnership with Iriduum, the Aireon company installed ADS-B transceivers on 66 Iridium NEXT satellites that have been launched into space over the past several years. Mr. Thoma informed ALPA that all satellites are now successfully in orbit, and final preparations are under way for initial use of the satellite-based tracking system. The global tracking of all ADS-B equipped aircraft is expected to increase the likelihood that an aircraft's location is always known, and to reduce the time spent searching for aircraft in distress.
While visiting ALPA's D.C. office, Mr. Thoma also presented Capt. DePete with a framed copy of a plaque that is attached to their ADS-B transceiver on Inmarsat's satellite number 129. The plaque includes the ALPA logo and the recognition of ALPA's partnership in developing and promoting global air traffic surveillance technologies.

NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD MOST WANTED LIST
As a proud partner in advancing aviation safety, ALPA recognizes and applauds the work of the National Transportation Safety Board in creating priorities for improving the safety of our skies. The NTSB's Most Wanted List reflects the dynamic nature of risk analysis and mitigation in our industry.
As the world's largest nongovernmental aviation safety organization, ALPA remains committed to a safer industry and is grateful for the extraordinary dedication and professionalism of all those at the NTSB who play such a critical role in advancing aviation safety.

"PART OF ALPA'S HISTORY GOING FORWARD" CONVENES AT LEADERSHIP TRAINING CONFERENCE
"Following in the footsteps of the 24 Key Men, you are now part of ALPA's history going forward," proclaimed Capt. David Farmer (DAL), chairman of ALPA's Leadership Committee, as he welcomed more than 85 new ALPA representatives in Herndon, Va., this week for the annual Leadership Training Conference. Each year, ALPA hosts newly elected local council representatives to provide them a primer on all things ALPA and put them in the best possible position to serve their fellow pilots. “It's not an easy job you've been elected to, but it's a great job," ALPA president Capt. Joe DePete told attendees. "It's a great, rewarding job, and I thank you for taking it on." Some attendees are already serving as a local rep or in another elected position, but many others take office officially on March 1 and are getting their first taste of the "ALPA toolbox" this week.
Capt. Bill Couette, vice president–administration/secretary, told pilots, "You're going to meet a lot of people this week—pilots and staff—who are going to be able to help you in your position. Network." Throughout the week, the attendees will hear from those pilots and staff who will be their support system during their time in leadership positions and receive information to help them in their new roles. "You're not going to leave here knowing the answer to every question your pilots might ask," concluded Farmer, "but you should at least know who to ask to find out the answer."
The pilots also heard from Capt. Evan Cullen, president of Irish ALPA. Cullen detailed his history of unionism and spoke about the significant differences in union activity in the United States versus in Ireland and in the European Union. In doing so, he echoed the words of Capt. DePete in stressing the need for global unity in the airline profession.
Look for more coverage of the Leadership Training Conference in the March issue of Air Line Pilot.

DOING YOUR TAXES? THINGS HAVE CHANGED.
A pilot flying the line is always on business travel, and under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, there are many new tax rules that will affect your 2018 tax return.
Tax-Prep Tips from ALPA

NGPA INDUSTRY EXPO—HAVE QUESTIONS FOR ALPA? COME ASK ON FRIDAY!
ALPA volunteers will be manning a table at the National Gay Pilots Association's (NGPA's) Industry Expo this Friday, February 8, held in conjunction with the organization's Winter Warm-Up Expo in Palm Springs, Calif.
The NGPA Industry Expo is the second-largest pilot recruiting and networking event in the United States. ALPA's presence provides an opportunity for members to advance their careers to interact with volunteers, plus the ability to introduce ALPA to potential future members.
If you're in Palm Springs looking for the next stop on your career path, be sure to stop by the ALPA table to say hello—we'll have some ALPA swag available for members! Ask questions, see a friendly face, and learn more about what your Association offers.

INTERNATIONAL YOUTH EXCHANGE: A SUMMER PROGRAM FOR AIRLINE FAMILIES
International Youth Exchange matches your family with an airline family abroad so your teen can travel in the summer. The program connects teens ages 14 to 19 with a similar-aged teen from an airline family abroad, and each teen uses his or her family's flight privileges to travel. They spend two weeks together in each of their homes, for a total of four weeks. During the exchange, your son or daughter will have the opportunity to explore another country, learn about another culture and improve his or her foreign language skills from someone their same age.
The program costs $300 USD for the application fee, which is 100 percent refundable if a suitable match family is not found.

amcnd
02-06-2019, 04:40 PM
Nevjet....Any reply on Alpa and this new UA scope work around???

Nevjets
02-07-2019, 11:50 AM
Nevjet....Any reply on Alpa and this new UA scope work around???


UA scope workaround? Are you referring to the CRJ550? I haven’t heard or seen anything coming from the UAL MEC. That’s probably because as far as anyone knows, this scheme is in compliance with their regional jet scope clause.

Nevjets
02-13-2019, 04:36 PM
FAA ISSUES NEW DRONE RULES
Today, the FAA released rules to regulate small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS). One is an interim final rule effective in 10 days regarding an external marking requirement for sUAS. It requires all registered UAS operators to display the registration number on the drone instead of hiding it inside a compartment. ALPA views this as a significant step forward in ensuring that all UAS are visibly marked.
The FAA also issued two rulemaking actions, one of which is a notice of proposed rulemaking to expand FAR Part 107 sUAS operations to include flight over people and operations at night. The proposal will require additional safety features before authorizing these types of operations. The FAA also released an advanced notice of proposed rulemaking for the "Safe and Secure Operations of Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems" that seeks answers to nearly 30 questions about how to establish rules for remote identification and tracking of sUAS and the development of an unmanned traffic management system. ALPA intends to comment on both regulatory proposals within the 60-day comment period.

RUNWAY SAFETY RISK—A SHARED RESPONSIBILITY
On the heels of the Transportation Safety Board making a number of recommendations to improve safety at Canada's busiest airport (Toronto Pearson International), ALPA staff from both Canada and United States made their way to Vancouver this week to take part in a two-day conference on common aviation risk models (CARM), hosted by NAV CANADA and facilitated by The Aloft Group.

This year's theme "Runway Safety Risk—A Shared Responsibility," focused on high-interest risk issues for aircraft operators, air navigation service providers, airport operators, ground handlers, and others focused on aviation activities at airports with the goal of gaining a clearer understanding of threats, existing and proposed barriers to undesired aircraft states, human and organizational factors, and consequence scenarios and how all industry participants can collaborate to improve incident barrier management. Clear goals were established to address these issues.
Additional discussions involved runway excursion risks and the influence of unstable approaches/go-around risks. As the conference came to an end, industry participants were asked to collaborate to find improvements to the current CARM models.

PILOTS GATHER FOR ALPA'S BASIC SAFETY SCHOOL
ALPA's Air Safety Organization (ASO) is hosting its Basic Safety School (BSS) this week at the Association's conference center in Herndon, Va. Forty-seven pilots from 18 pilot groups are attending the three-day course that prepares line pilots to serve their fellow ALPA members and the traveling and shipping public.

Capt. Don Sterling (UAL), ALPA's ASO BSS course director, said, "You have stepped up and volunteered to do some of the most important work the Association has. This course will help you learn your role in the ASO and the tools it has to help you in the work ahead."
BSS is the foundation for ALPA's safety and security training programs for pilot volunteers, covering the fundamentals of ALPA's policies, as well as guidance for safety volunteers—like what happens when someone calls the ALPA Worldwide Accident/Serious Incident Hotline—and includes an explanation of all the technical and legal resources available to ALPA members.
BSS is the prerequisite for several other safety and accident investigation training courses provided by seasoned ALPA instructors:
Safety Leadership School,
Risk Management Course,
Airport Safety Liaison,
Accident Investigation Course, and
Advanced Accident Investigation Course.
The course also includes an optional half-day training for pilots interested in becoming airport safety liaisons—pilots who act as a resource to airport management and local ATC by providing a line pilot's perspective and technical knowledge.
The second and final BSS for 2019 will be held June 25–27. To attend, you must be an ALPA member in good standing and receive prior approval from your MEC Central Air Safety chairman before registering.
Stay tuned for additional coverage of this week's ASO trainings in Air Line Pilot.

INSIDE ALPA'S LEADERSHIP TRAINING: WATCH NOW

Watch now.
https://youtu.be/bxw8S2nc2ck
Take a deeper look inside ALPA's annual Leadership Training Conference. The 2019 event wrapped up last week, and more than 85 representatives left ALPA's Herndon, Va., office with all the tools they need to support and represent ALPA's members.

FLYING THE LINE—A NEW PODCAST FROM ALPA
ALPA has a long history of accomplishments from organizing and bargaining to critical improvements in aviation safety and security . . . but how did it all start? Join us in retracing the fascinating and, at times, tragic journey of ALPA's history in our new podcast, Flying the Line!
Flying the Line chronicles the time before the labor protections, safe working environments, and employee benefits that we enjoy as commercial pilots today. It's the story of Capt. Behncke and his 24 "Key Men" joining together to form ALPA, fighting their opponents every step of the way.
Episode 1 is available now on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Spotify, and other popular podcast services (search "Flying the Line"). Listen, share, and give it a five-star rating!

Nevjets
02-13-2019, 04:37 PM
COLGAN AIR FLIGHT 3407: 10 YEARS LATER
For the aviation industry, February 12 serves as an annual reminder of why airline pilots are committed to lifelong training to keep flying safe. Yesterday marked 10 years since the Colgan Air Flight 3407 tragedy, which became a watershed for aviation safety improvements. The Colgan accident was the last in a series of four high-profile fatal airline accidents over a six-year timeframe in the United States, and in the aftermath, significant positive changes in aviation safety emerged.

http://www.alpa.org/news-and-events/air-line-pilot-magazine/colgan-3407-10-years-later

Nevjets
02-21-2019, 06:50 AM
ALPA REP SELECTED TO SERVE ON IN-FLIGHT SEXUAL MISCONDUCT TASK FORCE
Late last week, the U.S. Department of Transportation announced the creation of the National In-flight Sexual Misconduct Task Force on which ALPA will be represented by F/O Kaori Paris (UAL) with support from the Engineering & Air Safety (E&AS) Department. The 14-member task force also includes representatives from airlines, airports, flight attendants, law enforcement, the FBI, and relevant interest groups.
According to a press release from the DOT, "The Task Force will review and evaluate current practices, protocols, and requirements of U.S. airlines in responding to and reporting allegations by passengers of sexual misconduct on board commercial aircraft. It will also provide recommendations on best practices relating to training, reporting, and data collection regarding incidents of sexual misconduct by passengers onboard commercial aircraft."
The task force was mandated by Congress according to a provision in the 2018 FAA Reauthorization Act, the inclusion of which ALPA supported.

PREPARING FOR LEGISLATIVE ENGAGEMENT ON PILOT PRIORITIES
While Republicans and Democrats in Congress unveiled spending legislation that would avoid a government shutdown through September, ALPA hosted a conference for Government Affairs chairs from across the Association in our Washington, D.C. office. As the 116th Congress officially kicked off, these ALPA representatives got up to speed on the union's current legislative agenda. A major component of the one-day event was learning proper techniques for engagement with Members of Congress on ALPA's top issues: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) reauthorization implementation and enforcing international air transport agreements.
As one of the Association's top legislative priorities this year, ALPA supports Congressional oversight to ensure that all provisions of the FAA reauthorization are implemented as Congress intended in a timely manner. Learn more.
ALPA also supports legislation to formally define flags-of-convenience as counter to the public interest of the U.S. and to require DOT to consider the public interest factor in all foreign air carrier permit applications. Learn more.
Attendees of this week's conference also learned valuable skills for building their Government Affairs committees within their own pilot groups, running a successful ALPA-PAC drive, productive social media engagement, and developing ALPA government affairs advocates across the country.
ALPA looks forward to engaging with Congress and the Administration to ensure the safety and security of our profession. The Government Affairs Chairs and their volunteers will be frontline for this advocacy.

Blackwing
02-25-2019, 11:21 PM
Places like Mesa and CommutAir are part of UAL’s career path program, but at SkyWest you’ll be lucky if they let you flow through to SkyWest Mainline (unless you’re a CRJ FO—in which case people who don’t even work here yet have priority over you for those ERJ training slots).

Nevjets
02-26-2019, 02:47 PM
Places like Mesa and CommutAir are part of UAL’s career path program, but at SkyWest you’ll be lucky if they let you flow through to SkyWest Mainline (unless you’re a CRJ FO—in which case people who don’t even work here yet have priority over you for those ERJ training slots).


Trans States and Air Wisconsin are also part of the UAL CPP.

Melit
02-27-2019, 04:35 AM
Places like Mesa and CommutAir are part of UAL’s career path program, but at SkyWest you’ll be lucky if they let you flow through to SkyWest Mainline (unless you’re a CRJ FO—in which case people who don’t even work here yet have priority over you for those ERJ training slots).
Yet their classes are still full..

Skyhawk121
02-27-2019, 07:04 AM
Is the CPP an actual direct flow or is it just a guaranteed to get you a resume review / interview?

flynd94
02-27-2019, 12:45 PM
Trans States and Air Wisconsin are also part of the UAL CPP.


When did TSA get the CPP? The only UAX carriers are Commutair, Air Wisky and Xjet.

ninerdriver
02-27-2019, 12:50 PM
When did TSA get the CPP? The only UAX carriers are Commutair, Air Wisky and Xjet.

And TSA. And Mesa. And GoJet. And Republic. And, umm, SkyWest.

flynd94
02-27-2019, 01:33 PM
And TSA. And Mesa. And GoJet. And Republic. And, umm, SkyWest.

Actually no. Only ALPA carriers (or any carrier)are MAG, C5, Air Whisky and Xjet. Those are the only ones who have the CPP

jacburn
02-27-2019, 01:42 PM
And TSA. And Mesa. And GoJet. And Republic. And, umm, SkyWest.
Almost, but it is CommutAir, ExpressJet, Air Wisconsin, Mesa, and also UND and Metropolitan State University in DEN

Nevjets
02-27-2019, 01:56 PM
When did TSA get the CPP? The only UAX carriers are Commutair, Air Wisky and Xjet.


Sorry, I misread something. TSA doesn’t have a CPP yet. Only commutair, Air Wisconsin, Mesa, and ExpressJet.

Almost, but it is CommutAir, ExpressJet, Air Wisconsin, Mesa, and also UND and Metropolitan State University in DEN



What happened to ATCA?

jacburn
02-27-2019, 07:01 PM
What happened to ATCA?

Not sure. The Lufthansa (Airline Training Center Arizona) was the first non airline to get the CPP. The only ones listed on united.com are the ones I posted.

https://www.united.com/web/en-US/content/company/career/program.aspx

Nevjets
02-28-2019, 02:00 PM
ALPA Applauds DOT Efforts to Enhance Aviation Safety Through the Safe Shipment of Lithium Batteries
WASHINGTON, D.C.—The Air Line Pilots Association, International (ALPA), the world’s largest nongovernmental aviation safety organization, today commended the Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) for issuing an interim final rule that would enhance safety provisions for lithium batteries transported by aircraft in the United States.

“This rulemaking is a major enhancement to U.S. aviation safety and supports ALPA’s long-held position that the shipment of lithium-ion batteries by air poses a significant safety risk,” said Capt. Joe DePete, ALPA president. “We are grateful for Secretary Chao’s and PHMSA’s leadership on this issue. ALPA remains committed to working with regulators to mitigate risks associated with the bulk shipment of lithium batteries by air and will continue to support all measures that ensure these batteries can be shipped safely.”

The interim final rule prohibits the transport of lithium-ion cells or batteries as cargo on passenger aircraft. In addition, the rulemaking requires lithium-ion cells and batteries to be shipped at not more than a 30 percent state of charge aboard cargo-only aircraft.

“We applaud PHMSA’s action that would take steps to increase the level of safety by harmonizing domestic rules with the International Civil Aviation Organization standards that apply to the shipment of lithium batteries on flights into and out of the United States. Today’s final rulemaking is a step in the right direction and will help to ensure that the flights within the United States have the same protections as international flights.”

MEMBERS COLLABORATE TO IMPROVE CABIN AIR QUALITY
Nearly 30 pilots from 15 airlines, plus staff from throughout the Association, assembled at ALPA's Herndon, Va., Conference Center on Monday to discuss cabin air quality.
Capt. Bob Fox, ALPA first vice president, opened the meeting, stating: "Cabin air quality is on the union's radar, which is why we have supported legislation on this issue and made changes to the ALPA Strategic Plan to reflect our concern. But there are many factors to be understood and questions that still need answers when it comes to cabin air quality."
F/O John Taylor (UAL), ALPA Pilot Assistance chair, noted that "in the past, we have called the issue 'fumes,' but we have shifted to 'cabin air quality' to reflect the more global nature of it. The mission now is to comprehensively determine the nature of the problem and what we can do about it."
The one-day meeting provided updates on a range of efforts from the relevant language in the 2018 FAA reauthorization bill to a new industry-formed task force, as well as an aeromedical brief and Q&A. Members from various carriers shared information on the programs currently in place to mitigate cabin air quality deficiencies at their airlines, as well as lessons learned, with other members. These collaborative efforts will assist in developing a focused path forward for the Association.
Capt. Steve Jangelis (DAL), Aviation Safety chair, and F/O Ellen Brinks (DAL), Aeromedical chair, led a roundtable discussion at the end of the meeting, and from that came a recommendation for a small, internal working group of pilots and staff to direct ongoing focus and attention to this issue.

ASO SAFETY AND TRAINING COUNCILS DISCUSS SAFETY PRIORITIES
This week, more than 70 ALPA Air Safety Organization (ASO) leaders and safety representatives from nearly every ALPA pilot group, along with Engineering and Air Safety Department staff, are gathered for a three-day joint meeting of the ASO Safety and Training councils. The meeting, which is taking place at the ALPA Conference Center in Herndon, Va., opened February 26, and discussions are focused on members' priority safety issues.
Addressing the joint meeting, Capt. Joe DePete, ALPA's president, thanked representatives and remarked, "The efforts 8of ALPA and its safety representatives do not go unnoticed. Your hard work is seen in the halls of government and industry, and that is best reflected in the wins you achieved for your fellow pilots in the recent FAA reauthorization."
Capt. Bob Fox, ALPA first vice president, observed, "You all bring unparalleled expertise and professionalism—day in and day out—to your roles. Know that the Association and I will do everything we can to support you."
Throughout the joint meeting, several group chairs led technical presentations on subjects such as accident analysis and prevention, aircraft design and operations, airport and ground environment, air traffic services, human factors, and Canadian issues.
Following the joint sessions, the Safety and Training councils separated to their respective bodies to discuss strategic plans and other council-specific action items. In addition to these meetings, the ASO's Steering and Oversight Committee, comprised of ASO leaders, convened to provide updates on and discuss their respective areas of work.

ALPA PRESIDENT CALLS ON COMMERCIAL SPACE COMMUNITY FOR SAFE INTEGRATION OF OPERATIONS
Yesterday, ALPA president Capt. Joe DePete voiced ALPA's call for the U.S. aviation and commercial space communities to develop a vision for safely integrating commercial space operations into the national airspace at the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Space Traffic Management Conference, which was held at the University of Texas-Austin.
DePete addressed a packed room of 175 registered attendees representing international and domestic industry, academia, regulators, researchers, and policy think tanks. In his remarks, DePete highlighted ALPA's efforts to bring the space and aviation communities together to foster a collaborative integration effort based on maintaining the high standards of safety that have made commercial air travel the world's safest mode of transportation.
ALPA's president underscored the importance of a creating a risk-predictive model for commercial space operations that incorporates the best practices of the aviation industry. He also previewed the Association's plans to hold a one-day symposium on commercial space as its next effort to bring the aerospace pilot community together so that aviation and space can understand each other's operations and forge solutions for integration that will maintain safety and efficiency for all users.
F/O Stephen Browning (United), ALPA's subject-matter expert on space, also participated in the two-day conference. On a panel entitled "NAS Integration Part 1: Getting There and Back," he presented the positions laid out in ALPA's commercial space white paper, "Addressing the Challenges to Aviation from Evolving Space Transportation," which was released in June 2018.

THANK YOU, CAPT. COREY SLONE

With February 19 marking Capt. Corey Slone's last day as ALPA's Human Intervention Motivation Study (HIMS) chair, ALPA extends our gratitude to Capt. Slone for his selfless contributions to help those whose livelihoods, and even their lives, truly depend on it. ALPA president Capt. Joe DePete recognized Capt. Slone as one of ALPA's "unsung heroes."
The HIMS program, which assists in the identification, treatment, and return to the cockpit of impaired aviators, falls under the Pilot Assistance umbrella of ALPA's Air Safety Organization. As HIMS chair, Capt. Slone planned and executed the Basic and Advanced HIMS Education Seminars each year, presented at industry seminars, supported all ALPA groups' HIMS chairs and programs, and fielded calls and e-mails from across the HIMS spectrum, from pilots to aviation medical examiners.
This past November, Capt. Slone shared his expertise in Sydney at the annual conference for the HIMS Australia Advisory Group Management Committee, which just last week expressed their appreciation in a letter that stated: "Capt. Slone's tremendous passion and dedication for the Human Intervention Motivation Study was showcased with his ability to tackle a very difficult and sensitive topic with humour and aplomb. [...] As an example of the respect in which he's held, the senior Flight Operations management team at Virgin Australia requested his assistance to write their HIMS policy. Corey is an ambassador for our profession and an asset to ALPA."
Fortunately, ALPA is not completely losing Capt. Slone's valuable services, as he will stay on with the HIMS program as a family affairs subject-matter expert.
First Officer Craig Ohmsieder (SPA) has been named ALPA's new HIMS chair, and we look forward to working with him and supporting his efforts.


ALPA SAFETY LEGEND FLIES WEST
ALPA was recently notified of the passing of Capt. John J. "Bud" Ruddy (UAL, Ret.), a historic figure in the Association's ongoing pursuit of aviation safety. Among his many accomplishments, Ruddy worked closely with the FAA to help institute a national runway friction measurement program, focusing largely on the degrading effects of rain, snow, and ice.
Ruddy also persuaded the agency to conduct a regulatory review of FAR Part 77 and reexamine its policies regarding obstructions near airports and other hazards to navigation. He played a key role in the investigation of the Air Florida Flight 90 accident in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 13, 1982. And together with Capt. Larry Horton (UAL, Ret.), the two proposed the idea for what would become ALPA's Airport Safety Liaison program.
In addition to his work with the ALPA Airport Standards Committee and the All-Weather Flying Committee, the United captain served as the Washington, D.C., area safety coordinator and was a local air safety chair. Over the years, he was honored for his efforts with numerous accolades including ALPA's 1981 Air Safety Award and the FAA's 1987 Distinguished Service Award.
Ruddy passed away on Dec. 24, 2018, and a private memorial service is planned for April 2019. ALPA fondly remembers this safety legend and extends its condolences to his family and friends.

Nevjets
03-02-2019, 10:51 AM
ALPA Applauds Legislation to Keep FAA Funded in the Event of Future Shutdowns

House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and Aviation Subcommittee Chairman Rick Larsen (D-WA) introduced legislation on February 8th that would allow the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to continue paying employees, including air traffic controllers and aviation safety inspectors, in the event of a future government shutdown. If passed, H.R. 1108, the Aviation Funding Stability Act of 2019, would authorize the FAA to draw funding from the Airport and Airway Trust Fund (AATF) during future government shutdowns.

On February 12th, ALPA joined a coalition of 40 industry stakeholders on a letter to the leaders of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee to convey strong support for H.R. 1108. In addition, ALPA president, Captain Joe DePete sent a letter of support to every member of the House of Representatives earlier this week.

In a statement released on February 8th, Captain DePete offered ALPA’s readiness to work with all Members of Congress, congressional committees, and the Administration to ensure the continued safe operation of our national airspace without interruption. H.R. 1108 currently has 61 bipartisan cosponsors in the House.

A similar bill, H.R. 1171 the Funding for Aviation Screeners and Threat Elimination Restoration (FASTER) Act, was introduced by Chairman DeFazio and Homeland Security Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson (D-MS) which would earmark the 9/11 security fee for TSA use only and allow that agency to operate via funds collected through this fee during future shutdowns.

Bipartisan Senators Urge DOT to Implement Secondary Barrier Mandate

Pennsylvania Senators Bob Casey (D) and Pat Toomey (R) wrote a letter to Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao on February 12th to urge the Department of Transportation (DOT) to strictly interpret the secondary barrier requirement included in the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Reauthorization Act of 2018.

Section 336 of the FAA Reauthorization Act requires “installation of a secondary cockpit barrier on each new aircraft that is manufactured for delivery to a passenger air carrier in the United States operating under the provisions of part 121 of title 14, Code of Regulations.” Senators Casey and Toomey note that some in the airline industry have recently attempted to argue that the provision only applies to new “models” of aircraft. However, the statutory meaning very clearly applies to all new aircraft for commercial passenger air carriers in the United States, not just new types of aircraft.

ALPA urges the Department of Transportation to adhere to the Congressional intent of the legislation and looks forward to its full implementation.
DOT Issues Long-Awaited Lithium Battery Rule

The Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) issued an interim final rule on February 27th that would enhance safety provisions for lithium batteries transported by aircraft in the United States. The interim final rule prohibits the transport of lithium-ion cells or batteries as cargo on passenger aircraft. In addition, the rulemaking requires lithium-ion cells and batteries to be shipped at not more than a 30 percent state of charge aboard cargo-only aircraft.

This rulemaking is a major enhancement to U.S. aviation safety and supports ALPA’s long-held position that the shipment of lithium batteries by air poses a significant safety risk without proper regulation and safety mitigations. ALPA applauds Secretary Chao’s and PHMSA’s action to harmonize domestic rules with the International Civil Aviation Organization standards that apply to the shipment of lithium batteries on flights into and out of the United States. Please read ALPA’s full press release here.
Government Affairs Chairs Meet in Washington

Government Affairs Chairs and Vice Chairs from ten ALPA carriers joined Government
Affairs staff in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, February 13th to discuss ALPA’s pilot partisan legislative agenda and grassroots strategy entering the 116th Congress.

Nevjets
03-06-2019, 10:23 PM
STREET SMARTS: ACTIVE SHOOTER EVENTS
What would you do if you encountered an active-shooter event? Incidents at airports in Belgium in March 2016 and Fort Lauderdale in January 2017 remind us that aviation is not exempt from these kinds of attacks. Watch episode 5 of ALPA's Street Smarts series to learn the importance of situational awareness and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's recommended course of action for keeping yourself and those around you alive.
ALPA's Street Smarts series educates ALPA members about potential threats that exist in their work environment, and offers strategies to promote safe and secure operations while minimizing risks.

STREET SMARTS: ACTIVE SHOOTER EVENTS
What would you do if you encountered an active-shooter event? Incidents at airports in Belgium in March 2016 and Fort Lauderdale in January 2017 remind us that aviation is not exempt from these kinds of attacks. Watch episode 5 of ALPA's Street Smarts series to learn the importance of situational awareness and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's recommended course of action for keeping yourself and those around you alive.
ALPA's Street Smarts series educates ALPA members about potential threats that exist in their work environment, and offers strategies to promote safe and secure operations while minimizing risks.

ADVOCATING FOR BETTER REPORTING AROUND DISRUPTIVE PASSENGER EVENTS
Last week at the IATA AVSEC World conference in Miami, Fla., ALPA representatives participated on a security panel focused on disruptive passengers. The panel was moderated by representatives from IATA and Emirates. Other panelists included a representative from Finnair and a staff member from ALPA's Engineering and Air Safety Department.
F/O Matt Clark (DAL), Delta MEC Security Chair and a member of ALPA's Aviation Security Group, spoke about the need for a standardized reporting process and form to support a more effective response by crewmembers, air carriers, and law enforcement. An open discussion related to the levels and types of events followed, but participants acknowledged that incidents are likely underreported because of a lack of uniformity in reporting protocols and the fact that there is virtually no legal/official requirement to report most types of incidents.
Superintendent Janis Gray from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police supported the need for better reporting to support a legal process that can move more quickly in enforcing sanctions against passengers who disrupt a flight. As part of the deterrent discussion, panelists noted the need for raising passenger awareness that certain behaviors are not appropriate, including sexual harassment. One way that can be done is by supporting a more immediate and localized law enforcement response to incidents that would allow authorities at the airport to issue citations, similar to that of a speeding ticket, to the passenger at the time of arrival of their flight versus the prospect of no type of prosecution because of the lengthy legal process.

ASO SECURITY COUNCIL CONVENES
This week, more than 25 MEC security chairs and coordinators representing security committees from 13 MECs met at the ALPA conference center in Herndon, Va., to discuss current issues and receive program updates from government officials.
Capt. Bob Fox, ALPA's first vice president and national safety coordinator, opened the plenary session, remarking, "Those who are looking to use aircraft to do harm never take a day off. It requires the vigilance, collaboration, and a drive toward self-improvement to ensure they never win again."
The meeting featured briefings from Transportation Security Administration (TSA) representatives on the Federal Flight Deck Officer (FFDO) program, Federal Air Marshal Service, and insider threats. In addition, the FBI presented a briefing on the ticketing system for misdemeanor crimes committed aboard aircraft. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police also traveled to ALPA to brief the council on their air marshal program, the Canadian Air Carrier Protective Program.
Capt. Eric Herman (SCA), Security Council chair, led briefings from ALPA subject-matter experts on several topics including FFDO policies, cargo security, unmanned aircraft systems, threatened airspace management, and cybersecurity.
The council is scheduled to reconvene at the ALPA Air Safety Forum July 15–18 in Washington, D.C. For additional coverage, read the April issue of Air Line Pilot.

NEW ALPA SECURITY REPS ARE READY FOR THE JOB
This week, representatives across the Association gathered for the Air Safety Organization's Security Training Course at ALPA's conference center in Herndon, Va.
Capt. Darrin Dorn (ALA), course director, noted, "In the wake of 9/11, our philosophy is 'never again' and this course will provide you with the knowledge, training, and skills to be a valuable member of your pilot group's aviation security committee and develop a 'security mindset.'"
Security Training introduces ALPA policies and protocols while giving guidance on how to serve as an MEC security representative. The course also covers specific topics including the ASO's security structure, events, current threats, posturing, resources, and priorities, as well as briefings on the Aircraft Operator Standard Security Program, handling sensitive security information, legal, and accounting. The course concludes with crewmember self-defense training at a local TSA facility.
Look for additional coverage in the April issue of Air Line Pilot magazine.

FLYING THE LINE: EPISODE 2 OUT NOW!
Flying the Line is a new podcast from ALPA that dives into the exciting, and sometimes tragic, history of the largest pilots' union in the world. This week, hear about the 24 "key men" who saw themselves as good "company men" but were labeled as "troublemakers" by their airline management. ALPA's Key Men faced much opposition from both management and other line pilots, but persevered in their work for labor protections, safe working conditions, and benefits, all of which are enjoyed by ALPA members today.
Episode 2 is available now on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Spotify, and other popular podcast services (search "Flying the Line"). Listen, share, and give it a five-star rating!

Nevjets
03-15-2019, 09:34 PM
UPDATE: FAA IDENTIFIES FLORIDA AME
The March 6, 2019, edition of FastRead notified members of a reported problem with airman medical certificates issued by a Florida aviation medical examiner (AME), and a FastRead Newsflash published on March 8 provided additional details. At the time of those publications, ALPA was not privy to the identity of the AME in question. However, this week, the FAA's federal air surgeon, Dr. Michael Berry, informed the Association that the AME is Dr. Robert Kurrle, MD.
Dr. Berry also provided ALPA with the template of the letter that is being sent to all examinees of Dr. Kurrle who still hold valid medical certificates. These letters are presently being mailed from the FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute in Oklahoma City, Okla. If you receive this certified letter from the FAA, please contact ALPA's Aeromedical Office

FAA EXPANDS UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEM OVERSIGHT
Recognizing the increased number of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) sightings near airports and growing set of data indicating that UAS pose potential risks to other aviation operations, the FAA issued a Notice (N 8900.504) to Flight Standards District Offices (FSDO) this week requiring them to establish a program for increased oversight of UAS activity.
The oversight program requires flight standards personnel to monitor reports of UAS sightings and track UAS investigations within Class B, C, D, or other airspace. When reports and sightings exceed certain parameters, FAA must visit the locations of recurring reported sightings. Additionally, investigations will be required for noncompliant operators who pose risk to firefighting, law enforcement, and emergency response efforts. A quarterly report will also be provided to FAA leadership that will include airports where UAS sightings are most frequently seen. The leadership will then assign UAS surveillance tasks near these identified airports.
ALPA continues to press for the safe integration of UAS into the NAS, including the requirement for an identification and tracking system for all UAS. Pilots are encouraged to inform ATC immediately and pass as much accurate information as possible about the drone/UAS sighting, to include:
Location
Altitude
Lateral and vertical separation
Size, shape, and appearance (e.g. quadcopter, fix-wing, color, etc.)

ALPA TRAINS PILOTS ON RISK MANAGEMENT, SAFETY LEADERSHIP
This week, pilots from around the United States and Canada assembled at ALPA's conference center in Herndon, Va., to take part in the ALPA Risk Management Course and Safety Leadership School, taught by ALPA Air Safety Organization (ASO) representatives and supported by Engineering and Air Safety staff.
Twenty pilots from 12 ALPA pilot groups attended the Risk Management Course, which familiarizes pilot safety reps with safety reporting programs such as SMS, the Aviation Safety Action Program, and the Flight Operations Quality Assurance Program. "This course is about giving you tools to be able to talk with your company's management about the risk management programs in place," said course leader F/O James Norman (DAL). "Aviation has come a long way since the days of just fixing and flying. The proactive processes we have today in safety management have demonstrated their value and importance to improving operational safety."
Starting Wednesday, also in Herndon, the ASO and Engineering and Air Safety staff held the Safety Leadership School to prepare experienced safety reps to take on leadership positions within the ASO Safety structure and successfully address various situations or scenarios they may encounter with management and government representatives.

BOEING 737 MAX UPDATE
The following is a reprint of a FastRead NewsFlash originally published by ALPA on March 13.
ALPA supports the decision by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and Transport Canada to ground the Boeing 737 MAX. The FAA reports that it made its decision "as a result of the data-gathering process and new evidence collected at the site and analyzed today." Out of an abundance of caution, North American regulators have acted in the best interests of aviation safety.
ALPA continues to monitor the situation and is working alongside aviation authorities in the United States and Canada to uphold the safety and integrity of our air transportation system. We strongly encourage the investigative authorities responsible to expedite the investigation of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 and identify any corrective action if necessary in order to return this aircraft to service.
ALPA stands ready, through the International Federation of Air Line Pilots' Associations, to assist the international aviation community in every way possible with the shared goal of advancing a safer air transportation system around the globe.

ALPA TESTIFIES BEFORE U.S. HOUSE: AVIATION 2050
On Tuesday, in testimony before the U.S. Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Subcommittee on Aviation at a hearing titled "Looking Forward: Aviation 2050," ALPA president Capt. Joe DePete discussed how the future of aviation can be built on the tremendous innovation that has already taken place throughout our industry's history and with a focus on keeping flying safe.
"Wilbur and Orville Wright were original innovators in aviation—and the first of many innovators in the U.S. airline industry. With every year, innovation has brought greater safety to our skies. And I'm proud to say I believe that ALPA's work in safety, security, and pilot assistance—and our support for technological innovation—are among the reasons why flying is the safest mode of transportation today," said DePete.
ALPA's president stressed that maintaining one level of safety throughout the national airspace is essential to fostering the innovation of tomorrow, adding, "When it comes to integrating new types of operations into the national airspace, we have the opportunity to do it right the first time."
The testimony urged Congress to lead the aviation industry in planning for the future: "We have an opportunity to innovate not only how we use our national airspace but also how we keep it safe. Together, we can protect what's most important to us all—our passengers, participants, crews, and cargo."

ALPA PRESIDENT ELECTED TO AFL-CIO EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
Yesterday, during a meeting at AFL-CIO headquarters in Washington, D.C., ALPA president Capt. Joe DePete was appointed by unanimous vote to the AFL-CIO Executive Council. The Executive Council is composed of democratically elected officials who represent the 12.5 million members of the AFL-CIO. They set broad policies and goals for the union movement.
"ALPA has been a strong partner in the labor movement for decades," said AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka. "ALPA's shared commitment to safety and protecting the rights of workers to collectively bargain is among the reasons the Executive Council is proud to have Capt. DePete's voice. Capt. DePete's lifelong commitment to unions and his strong leadership is an asset to the AFL-CIO as we seek to uphold and strengthen worker's rights."
ALPA has been affiliated with the AFL-CIO since its founding in 1955.

TACKLING THE BEHIND-THE-SCENES WORK AT THE SECRETARY-TREASURERS CONFERENCE
The annual Secretary-Treasurers Conference is taking place this week in ALPA's Herndon, Va., Conference Center, with 28 pilots from 20 different pilots groups learning, discussing, and networking their way through the ins and outs of their position.
"I attended this conference for years as a secretary-treasurer, so I know how valuable it can be," said Capt. Joseph Genovese, ALPA's vice president–finance/treasurer, in his introduction. "And I want to make it just as valuable for you; let us know what you need from us to serve your pilots best."
The conference provides the attendees—some in their first year in the position, others who are veterans here to learn the latest and share their own expertise—a 30,000-foot view of their job responsibilities and how to accomplish them. More importantly, they're able to meet the national officers and staff available to support them, as well as other secretary-treasurers who can be a valuable resource or sounding board.
Topics include running an MEC or LEC meeting, membership and financial reports, where pilots' dues dollars go, flight pay loss, budgeting, dues obligations, and more. Throughout the event, pilots are also providing feedback to Genovese on items to discuss with the new Structure, Services, and Finance Review Committee, which was established alongside the forthcoming dues reduction to address any financial impacts. While every ALPA member may not realize the extent of the work, every ALPA member is affected by the job done by these volunteers.
"It's a lot of behind-the-scenes work as secretary-treasurer," admits Capt. Bill Couette, ALPA's vice president–administration/secretary. "But it's important work and work that absolutely has to be done. Thank you for stepping up to do it."
Look for move coverage of the conference in the April issue of Air Line Pilot.

REGISTER TODAY: PILOT ASSISTANCE FORUM
Mark your calendar! ALPA's 2019 Pilot Assistance Forum will take place at the Hyatt Regency, Reston, Va., on May 22–23. Join fellow ALPA members and industry professionals as they share their pilot-assistance experiences addressing a variety of issues. The draft agenda for this year's forum is available online, and registration is open.
One of the four pillars of ALPA's Air Safety Organization, Pilot Assistance encompasses aeromedical issues, the Critical Incident Response Program, the HIMS alcohol and substance abuse treatment system, professional standards, and the Pilot Assistance network in Canada. For those interested in more than just the forum, Pilot Assistance week begins on May 20 at the ALPA Conference Center in Herndon, Va., with optional trainings and meetings for each of these programs.

redbone
03-16-2019, 12:49 PM
I don’t get it Nevjets. I’m a very pro ALPA guy but can’t understand what you would like to accomplish spamming this thread. We’re not gunna make any headway poking the bear.

Meow1215
03-16-2019, 05:15 PM
I don’t get it Nevjets. I’m a very pro ALPA guy but can’t understand what you would like to accomplish spamming this thread. We’re not gunna make any headway poking the bear.

I believe he is posting the current email that all ALPA members receive. Sometimes it has stuff you care about, sometimes not. Some might find it beneficial and enjoy the information. I don’t really think this is so much a recruitment effort as that would largely need to be an internal effort among the OO pilot group.

Melit
03-17-2019, 04:53 AM
There is a reason why Nevjets has been banned before

rickair7777
03-17-2019, 07:26 AM
I don’t get it Nevjets. I’m a very pro ALPA guy but can’t understand what you would like to accomplish spamming this thread. We’re not gunna make any headway poking the bear.

Actually he's doing it in a positive manner, showing what alpa can and does do for you (even as a regional pilot). Rather than scab shaming or intimidation, as has happened in the past.

Nevjets
03-19-2019, 04:27 AM
There is a reason why Nevjets has been banned before



And the reason was because merciful fate misinterpreted a post of mine and then went and told daddy that his feelings got hurt. Luckily, she isn’t around anymore. And I can continue to post useful information for those who would like to read it.

Nevjets
03-19-2019, 04:30 AM
I don’t get it Nevjets. I’m a very pro ALPA guy but can’t understand what you would like to accomplish spamming this thread. We’re not gunna make any headway poking the bear.


I’m not trying to spam. I’m just posting information about ALPA on a thread about ALPA. It’s the most relevant thread to post this information.

Most people, myself included, didn’t realize how much ALPA does for the entire aeronautical enterprise. Most people don’t read the ALPA magazines or sign up for these emails but when I did and learned all this, I realized that the best thing about ALPA is what they do for the profession in regards to safety, security, and pilot assistance. Having a contract is also nice, of course.;)

jacburn
03-19-2019, 06:06 AM
And the reason was because merciful fate misinterpreted a post of mine and then went and told daddy that his feelings got hurt. Luckily, she isn’t around anymore. And I can continue to post useful information for those who would like to read it.

Are you sure she is gone? Sounds like you just responded to her.

Nevjets
03-20-2019, 05:45 PM
TSA ISSUES NEW RULES FOR KCM PRIVILEGES
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has issued new rules concerning crewmember participation in KCM, which became effective January 31, 2019, but have just this week been amended and made available for ALPA's publication.
Previously, TSA field operations personnel unilaterally determined the duration of disqualification from KCM for certain security violations. The new rules standardize KCM disciplinary measures for crewmembers who violate KCM rules and other security regulations. These are in the form of disqualifications from KCM privileges ranging from six months to a permanent ban, depending on the seriousness and repetition of such violations. The agency has amended airline security programs with these disciplinary measures, which are designated as sensitive security information (SSI) and are not for public release. However, TSA has made certain information about the rules available, and airlines may share additional information with their own employees.

UPDATE: FLORIDA MEDICAL EXAMS
ALPA recently notified members of potential problems with some airman medical certificates issued by a Florida aviation medical examiner, Dr. Robert Kurrle. The FAA has informed ALPA that the number of airline pilots affected is very small. No action is required or expected of any pilot regarding this matter who does not receive a letter from the FAA indicating that a new medical examination is required.
If you receive a certified letter from the FAA and have further questions, please contact ALPA's Aeromedical Office at 303-341-4435. Physicians there can provide details on getting a new medical exam.

STATEMENT ON WHITE HOUSE INTENT TO NOMINATE NEXT FAA ADMINISTRATOR
Yesterday, ALPA issued the following statement after the White House announced its intent to nominate Capt. Steve Dickson as administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration:
"ALPA congratulates Steve Dickson on his nomination to lead the safest and most complex aviation system in the world.
"Capt. Dickson's extensive transportation experience would give him, if confirmed, a unique opportunity to enhance the safety of commercial aviation and we look forward to learning more about his vision on working collaboratively to protect and advance the safety of our national airspace. His nomination comes at a particularly critical time for the FAA, and it is our hope and expectation that the first of order business for him will be to reaffirm the agency's steadfast commitment to safety.
"We would like to thank Dan Elwell for his work leading the agency while serving as acting FAA administrator since January 2018, including during the period of the government shutdown."

FUTURE AIRLINE PILOTS MEET ALPA'S PRESIDENT AT UNIVERSITY EVENT

At Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University–Daytona's ALPA ACE Club meeting last night, an enthusiastic group of around 75 aviation students were treated to a special guest address from ALPA president Capt. Joe DePete. He was joined by ALPA Education Committee chairman F/O Costas Sivyllis (UAL) and ERAU Daytona liaison F/O Justin Dahan (FDX), as well as committee volunteers Capt. Fred Kopec (DAL), F/O Nick Bowers (PSA), Capt. Tim Reece (TSA), and F/O Jason Fox (XJT).
ALPA's president didn't limit his university visit to just the club meeting. Earlier in the day, Capt. DePete met with the university president, received a tour of the campus and flight line, and attended a luncheon with ACE club volunteers.
Following the event, Capt. DePete posted on Twitter, "Had a chance to meet with @ALPA_ACE_Club members at ERAU last night. What a great group of future #aviators! The future of the profession is in good hands. #AvGeek #WeAreALPA"
Through its Education Committee, ALPA promotes the piloting profession, mentors aspiring aviators, and prepares future generations of pilots to join the ranks of our members. The ACE Club, a professional development and mentoring program at 11 universities that helps bridge the gap between the classroom and the flight deck, is just one of these efforts.

REINFORCING THE NEED FOR FAIR COMPETITION AT CAPA EVENT
Capt. Bob Fox, ALPA first vice president, made clear that U.S. airline pilots and airlines need a level playing field this week at the Centre for Aviation's 2019 Americas Aviation Summit, held in Denver, Colo. In comments on a panel titled, "Unlocking the U.S. domestic airline system: Operational vs. commercial implications," he presented ALPA's policy perspectives on a range of priority issues.
Fox pointed out that U.S. airlines depend on fair competition and that the biggest threat to the U.S. domestic system is subsidized foreign competition that undermines long-haul international routes. He noted that ALPA is gratified that the Trump administration reports it has taken steps to force the United Arab Emirates and Qatar to operate on market-based principles and disclose financial information as well as commit to not operate fifth-freedom EU-U.S. nonstop passenger flights to the United States.
In describing ALPA's position on the recent U.S. government agreements with both countries, "We have a really strong domestic operation around the system that feeds our international operations, and it works in parallel in a market-based environment," said Capt. Fox. "We're going to look for the administration to enforce those agreements."
In addition, ALPA's first vice president noted that there is currently no pilot shortage in the United States and underscored that ALPA engaged with 15,000 students and with 24 aviation universities last year. "We're the leaders of the world in the aviation market," Fox reminded conference participants. "That lead is providing the safety network that we have in the United States."
ALPA CHAMPIONS WOMEN IN AVIATION AT ANNUAL CONFERENCE
More than 4,500 aviation and aerospace professionals gathered for the 30th annual International Women in Aviation Conference March 14–16 in Long Beach, Calif. Positive energy flowed throughout the Long Beach Convention Center as aviators from all sectors of the industry sought to connect, engage, and inspire one another in their professional and personal lives.
ALPA's outreach, led by its Education and Membership committees, included a booth in the exhibit hall, an informal session to talk about life as an airline pilot, and participation in WAI's Girls in Aviation Day to spark girls' interest in the profession. The "Cleared to Dream" booth was in a prime location, drawing hundreds of current and future pilots to talk about the profession. In addition, more than 80 pilots flying for ALPA and non-ALPA airlines, the military, and students at various stages of their training attended the "Coffee Talk" event to discuss maintaining a work-life balance, family issues, finding a path to the airlines, and other issues. ALPA pilots were also involved in the activities portion of Girls in Aviation Day, teaching girls about air traffic control and aircraft spacing, ground navigation, and how to fly on a simulator.
Stay tuned and check out the April issue of Air Line Pilot for more detailed coverage of ALPA's outreach at the 2019 International Women in Aviation conference.

Check Complete
03-21-2019, 04:44 AM
Nevjets,

Thank you for your posts that indicate how a large and powerful pilot advocating union has a positive and meaningful purpose to all pilots. My hope is, hopefully soon, SkyWest pilots can see the benefits of such inclusion and past the koolaid misted clouds of management.

mercys ghost
03-23-2019, 07:51 AM
Are you sure she is gone? Sounds like you just responded to her.


Don't think "she" is gone.....

mercys ghost
03-23-2019, 08:03 AM
Nevjets,

Thank you for your posts that indicate how a large and powerful pilot advocating union has a positive and meaningful purpose to all pilots. My hope is, hopefully soon, SkyWest pilots can see the benefits of such inclusion and past the koolaid misted clouds of management.


So trade the koolaid misted clouds of management, and paying for the koolaid misted clouds of a union?

Nevjets
03-23-2019, 11:11 AM
So trade the koolaid misted clouds of management, and paying for the koolaid misted clouds of a union?


Read the ALPA updates I’ve been posting in this thread. Management doesn’t do any of those things for pilots that ALPA does. And I don’t expect them to. I expect them to have a fiduciary responsibility to the shareholders, like they are supposed to. So maybe it’s good to have someone have a fiduciary responsibility to the pilots. This way, it’s not just one sided. You can’t have a balance if all the weight is on one side of the scale. This isn’t koolaid or mist. It’s just smart business.

Check Complete
03-23-2019, 11:24 AM
So trade the koolaid misted clouds of management, and paying for the koolaid misted clouds of a union?

To have a real contract, absolutely!

Not really fooling anybody fate....

mercys ghost
03-23-2019, 11:29 AM
To have a real contract, absolutely!

Not really fooling anybody fate....


Well, there are reasons for the username, and the goal is not to fool anyone. Should be blatantly obvious.

mercys ghost
03-23-2019, 11:35 AM
Read the ALPA updates I’ve been posting in this thread. Management doesn’t do any of those things for pilots that ALPA does. And I don’t expect them to. I expect them to have a fiduciary responsibility to the shareholders, like they are supposed to. So maybe it’s good to have someone have a fiduciary responsibility to the pilots. This way, it’s not just one sided. You can’t have a balance if all the weight is on one side of the scale. This isn’t koolaid or mist. It’s just smart business.


Smart business is in the eye of the beholder however. Why do you just advocate for pilot unions, and not for union representation for other work groups? Granted I understand you are a pilot, and making a case for pilots, but why stop there? And in all honesty, why are you so focused on SkyWest pilots? Do you really want what is best for them? Are you mad that you feel SkyWest pilots have piggy-backed off and had benefits granted to them without a union and feel they need to pay their dues?

Meow1215
03-23-2019, 04:31 PM
And in all honesty, why are you so focused on SkyWest pilots?

It’s a collective - it’s strength is in its numbers. OO is a huge pilot group that does not currently have any representation. I can say with full honesty that I was hoping that your new contract would exceed both Endeavor and Republic in every way. It didn’t, St. George gave just enough for it to squash the latest drive.

Why would another pilot want you to have a better contract?
- it sets the tone for their next negotiation
- it protects other pilot jobs because the lowest bidder can’t just undercut everyone else by making their workforce miserable
- it means we are a unified voice in what is the standards for our profession

mercys ghost
03-23-2019, 05:40 PM
It’s a collective - it’s strength is in its numbers. OO is a huge pilot group that does not currently have any representation. I can say with full honesty that I was hoping that your new contract would exceed both Endeavor and Republic in every way. It didn’t, St. George gave just enough for it to squash the latest drive.

Why would another pilot want you to have a better contract?
- it sets the tone for their next negotiation
- it protects other pilot jobs because the lowest bidder can’t just undercut everyone else by making their workforce miserable
- it means we are a unified voice in what is the standards for our profession


Strength in numbers? Sure appears that organizations like ALPA already seem to have a pretty good stronghold on things, so I don't agree with that as a reason. If pilots want a union, they will vote it in, regardless of what management does. If the latest contract is what kept a union out, then it would to be a win win for both management and pilots.

Meow1215
03-23-2019, 06:37 PM
Strength in numbers? Sure appears that organizations like ALPA already seem to have a pretty good stronghold on things, so I don't agree with that as a reason. If pilots want a union, they will vote it in, regardless of what management does. If the latest contract is what kept a union out, then it would to be a win win for both management and pilots.

Yes ALPA is large, it’s has many members and it’s strength is in its numbers. Many none ALPA pilots have benefited from ALPAs collective actions. But do you seriously think that adding 4,000 pilots is not benefit to their ranks?

Aside management campaigns against organizing; I don’t know exactly why attempts to organize have been unsuccessful by ALPA or any other union for that matter. But, I will say it is to managements benefit, not yours that their continues to be no CBA. There is a fine line between good and good enough.

Check Complete
03-23-2019, 09:18 PM
The plain and simple fact that management spends so much time, effort, and expense to keep a union away from the pilots is proof we need one. SAPA has some great people in it, but as one former rep said(that got recently voted out) that there are subtle and insidious threats and statements made during joint meetings with management. Management pays for SAPA for the reason as they can control them.

If anyone really believes management has our best interests in mind has got to be blind.

We really don't need a union ghost buster pushing managements agenda.

mercys ghost
03-24-2019, 07:38 AM
The plain and simple fact that management spends so much time, effort, and expense to keep a union away from the pilots is proof we need one. SAPA has some great people in it, but as one former rep said(that got recently voted out) that there are subtle and insidious threats and statements made during joint meetings with management. Management pays for SAPA for the reason as they can control them.

If anyone really believes management has our best interests in mind has got to be blind.

We really don't need a union ghost buster pushing managements agenda.


That is quite an interesting statement. I don't know of any corporation that wants any work group to be unionized. So, a corporation who is proactive to make people happy enough to keep a union out is all the more reason a union is needed? That is some serious one sided logic. Sounds like to me that no matter what your management does, it will never be good enough in your eyes. Makes for a pretty rough and miserable career if you ask me.

amcnd
03-24-2019, 08:40 AM
Ya. Trust me. They don’t spend money keeping alpa off property. Doubtful that they have even put more then 10 seconds thought on alpa the past 2 years...

(Dang it. I bumped this topic up again).

gojo
03-24-2019, 09:30 AM
Ya. Trust me. They don’t spend money keeping alpa off property. Doubtful that they have even put more then 10 seconds thought on alpa the past 2 years...

(Dang it. I bumped this topic up again).

Really, care to expand?

Meow1215
03-24-2019, 10:07 AM
Ya. Trust me. They don’t spend money keeping alpa off property. Doubtful that they have even put more then 10 seconds thought on alpa the past 2 years...

(Dang it. I bumped this topic up again).

Who pays for SAPA?

amcnd
03-24-2019, 10:36 AM
The company pays for sapa, sapa doesn’t spend time thwarting off ALPA. And CC, MT and TT. don’t spend there days trying to block ALPA.. (dangit. Bumpeoit again!! Not doing that again)

Meow1215
03-24-2019, 10:53 AM
The company pays for sapa, sapa doesn’t spend time thwarting off ALPA. And CC, MT and TT. don’t spend there days trying to block ALPA.. (dangit. Bumpeoit again!! Not doing that again)

Of course SAPA doesn’t say anything about ALPA, that would be counter productive.
But OO paying for their own in house union is an effort to prevent an external union. They don’t do because for your benefit.

And yes - everytime you reply you bump the thread up. I understand you don’t want to, but want to reply and now have a choice to make - Godspeed in your decision.

amcnd
03-24-2019, 11:09 AM
Honestly I’ve been alpa. And didn’t mind it. Other then the long.... long... negotiation process... and useless banter... the problem is the only place i hear about a alpa drive is on this forum!!! Seriously. You ask anyone online and they respond. “Never heard of it”..

ninerdriver
03-24-2019, 11:41 AM
Ya. Trust me. They don’t spend money keeping alpa off property.

Doesn't your last raise run counter to that claim? OO ALPA was a pretty hot topic until that raise happened.

mercys ghost
03-24-2019, 12:12 PM
Of course SAPA doesn’t say anything about ALPA, that would be counter productive.
But OO paying for their own in house union is an effort to prevent an external union. They don’t do because for your benefit.

And yes - everytime you reply you bump the thread up. I understand you don’t want to, but want to reply and now have a choice to make - Godspeed in your decision.


Have you ever served as a rep for your in house representation?

Nevjets
03-24-2019, 12:22 PM
Smart business is in the eye of the beholder however. Why do you just advocate for pilot unions, and not for union representation for other work groups? Granted I understand you are a pilot, and making a case for pilots, but why stop there? And in all honesty, why are you so focused on SkyWest pilots? Do you really want what is best for them? Are you mad that you feel SkyWest pilots have piggy-backed off and had benefits granted to them without a union and feel they need to pay their dues?


When one side has people looking out for their best interest, the other side should have the same, if only to make it more of an even playing field. Yes, that’s absolutely smart business.

Like you said, I’m a pilot. Skywest pilots are the largest non-union group. Them being part of ALPA would strengthen the pilot community. So you can say that it is selfish if you want. I feel there is a lot of talent in their large pilot group that would be useful in advancing safety and security. This has been my biggest reason for pilots to join ALPA, the contract and representation secondary. I’ve been preaching this for years. So like I said, call it selfishness on my part. But I truly believe Skywest pilots would get more out of ALPA if they joined than I would individually.

As for other work groups, I have no problem if they unionize, more power to them. If they are taking about organizing, I’ll be right there supporting them as well. But this forum is a pilot forum.

So what’s your angle? Are you a pilot? A Skywest pilot? A Skywest employee? What is your agenda? What motivates you so much so as to take the position that Skywest pilots don’t deserve their own representation at all levels of their profession? What do you get out of them remaining non-union?

Nevjets
03-24-2019, 12:54 PM
Ya. Trust me. They don’t spend money keeping alpa off property. Doubtful that they have even put more then 10 seconds thought on alpa the past 2 years...



(Dang it. I bumped this topic up again).


If you look at Skywest Inc’s 10k, unionizing is one risk factors they list out. So that’s something. But it should make you wonder why management sees that as a risk factor to them.

And don’t worry about bumping this thread because I’ll be doing that at least once a week when the ALPA fast read comes out.;)

amcnd
03-24-2019, 01:25 PM
If you look at Skywest Inc’s 10k, unionizing is one risk factors they list out. So that’s something. But it should make you wonder why management sees that as a risk factor to them.

And don’t worry about bumping this thread because I’ll be doing that at least once a week when the ALPA fast read comes out.;)

Nothing in the 10K filling list “SkyWest pilot joining alpa” as a risk factor. Its a generic statement about labor cost. And more related to ExpressJet and all
Employee groups. . So point to me exact verbiage in the next 10K that list SkyWest pilot and Alpa as a risk factor... other then a “distraction” as listed in the 10K

Any smart person know increase labor adds cost. From a Unions doing or non union.. of course thats a risk factor...

If anyone is familiar with 10k fillings or earnings calls. You would know about the “forward looking statements” clause and listing out “risks” as to not be liable to investors...

Meow1215
03-24-2019, 02:02 PM
Have you ever served as a rep for your in house representation?

Yep, I’m not currently a rep. But I’m still active on a few committees.

mercys ghost
03-24-2019, 02:09 PM
When one side has people looking out for their best interest, the other side should have the same, if only to make it more of an even playing field. Yes, that’s absolutely smart business.

Like you said, I’m a pilot. Skywest pilots are the largest non-union group. Them being part of ALPA would strengthen the pilot community. So you can say that it is selfish if you want. I feel there is a lot of talent in their large pilot group that would be useful in advancing safety and security. This has been my biggest reason for pilots to join ALPA, the contract and representation secondary. I’ve been preaching this for years. So like I said, call it selfishness on my part. But I truly believe Skywest pilots would get more out of ALPA if they joined than I would individually.

As for other work groups, I have no problem if they unionize, more power to them. If they are taking about organizing, I’ll be right there supporting them as well. But this forum is a pilot forum.

So what’s your angle? Are you a pilot? A Skywest pilot? A Skywest employee? What is your agenda? What motivates you so much so as to take the position that Skywest pilots don’t deserve their own representation at all levels of their profession? What do you get out of them remaining non-union?


Nev, look at my username.

mercys ghost
03-24-2019, 02:24 PM
Yep, I’m not currently a rep. But I’m still active on a few committees.




So are the reps compensated from the company for their time and work with this group?

Meow1215
03-24-2019, 02:32 PM
So are the reps compensated from the company for their time and work with this group?

Nope, I don’t think any ALPA entity is compensating anything on APC.

mercys ghost
03-24-2019, 02:34 PM
Nope

Filler




So explain how this works exactly....reps work for free? Who selects the reps? The company?

Meow1215
03-24-2019, 02:58 PM
So explain how this works exactly....reps work for free? Who selects the reps? The company?

Reps are elected on LEC level (local base) by seat (CA and FO) by the eligible voting members in that base (basically non-probationary pilots). They are volunteers, they will receive flight loss pay for obligations that will remove flying. Additionally, they are eligible for per diem, hotel, and positive space travel to and from approved MEC events.
The only person in a MEC getting paid to be on ALPA is the Chairmen because it’s a full time job and the pay for that is monthly guarantee for the year. It’s not exactly a money maker. If you want to be an ALPA rep for the money you will have allot of regrets.

Nevjets
03-24-2019, 03:29 PM
Nev, look at my username.


Yeah, and look at mine. You didn’t answer the question.

Nevjets
03-24-2019, 03:39 PM
So explain how this works exactly....reps work for free? Who selects the reps? The company?


Members in good standing (dues paying members) are eligible to vote for their local council representatives. These reps are volunteers. They don’t make anymore than they would flying the line. They are eligible for flight pay loss in order to attend MEC meetings. The way this works is that the MEC notifies the company of people needing off of a trip. The trip is paid for by union dues. Same goes for any trip removed from any ALPA volunteer. Per diem or food along with hotels are paid for by ALPA. If the pilot contract also has provisions negotiated for positive space travel (not all contracts have this), then that is provided by the company. Any local council meetings, representation meetings, committee meetings, everything else is purely voluntary use of their time/resources.

There is no money paid by the company for any union business unless it was negotiated for into the contract. For example, some expenses for merger related meetings can and usually are negotiated for in a transition agreement. But those expenses wouldn’t exist if the company hadn’t made the business decision to merge, hence why it’s negotiated that the company pays for it.

Nevjets
03-24-2019, 04:00 PM
Nothing in the 10K filling list “SkyWest pilot joining alpa” as a risk factor. Its a generic statement about labor cost. And more related to ExpressJet and all

Employee groups. . So point to me exact verbiage in the next 10K that list SkyWest pilot and Alpa as a risk factor... other then a “distraction” as listed in the 10K



Any smart person know increase labor adds cost. From a Unions doing or non union.. of course thats a risk factor...



If anyone is familiar with 10k fillings or earnings calls. You would know about the “forward looking statements” clause and listing out “risks” as to not be liable to investors...


My point is that it’s not like what you make it seem, that they don’t give it a thought or spend money. Of course they do, it’s in their risk factors! They wouldn’t be smart business people if they didn’t. Like I said, it’s something. That statement was meant to convey that it may not be something they currently lose sleep over but that it’s definitely enough of an issue to list it as a risk factor, regardless of whether it’s generic or not.

I’m sure if a card drive is ever successful, they’ll be spending a lot more thoughts and money, like they did last time.

mercys ghost
03-24-2019, 05:29 PM
Yeah, and look at mine. You didn’t answer the question.


You already know the answers to those questions....Hopefully I don't have to spell this out for you.

mercys ghost
03-24-2019, 05:30 PM
Members in good standing (dues paying members) are eligible to vote for their local council representatives. These reps are volunteers. They don’t make anymore than they would flying the line. They are eligible for flight pay loss in order to attend MEC meetings. The way this works is that the MEC notifies the company of people needing off of a trip. The trip is paid for by union dues. Same goes for any trip removed from any ALPA volunteer. Per diem or food along with hotels are paid for by ALPA. If the pilot contract also has provisions negotiated for positive space travel (not all contracts have this), then that is provided by the company. Any local council meetings, representation meetings, committee meetings, everything else is purely voluntary use of their time/resources.

There is no money paid by the company for any union business unless it was negotiated for into the contract. For example, some expenses for merger related meetings can and usually are negotiated for in a transition agreement. But those expenses wouldn’t exist if the company hadn’t made the business decision to merge, hence why it’s negotiated that the company pays for it.




We were talking about the SkyWest reps, not ALPAs.

Check Complete
03-24-2019, 05:32 PM
The company pays for sapa, sapa doesn’t spend time thwarting off ALPA. And CC, MT and TT. don’t spend there days trying to block ALPA.. (dangit. Bumpeoit again!! Not doing that again)

2 weeks ago with CC the conversation about ALPA came up and that we don't need them.

All the more reason we do!

mercys ghost
03-24-2019, 05:35 PM
2 weeks ago with CC the conversation about ALPA came up and that we don't need them.

All the more reason we do!


I am honestly curious...why are you so hardcore gung-ho for a union. What exactly is your management doing that bothers you so much?

Check Complete
03-24-2019, 05:37 PM
Have you ever served as a rep for your in house representation?

Yes I have, and I was reminded more than once (as an LCA) that the company's interests are to be in the fore front and my actions are to be observed.

Which is why I can say first hand that outside organized representation is necessary.

Meow1215
03-24-2019, 05:44 PM
We were talking about the SkyWest reps, not ALPAs.

I too was talking about ALPA reps - I have absolutely no idea how the SAPA works or what they do for that matter.

Check Complete
03-24-2019, 05:46 PM
I am honestly curious...why are you so hardcore gung-ho for a union. What exactly is your management doing that bothers you so much?

It is my opinion that we do need a union, the very same reason that you don't.

From what I've gathered is you have changed user names and moved on, why do you still care and act as though you are doing questionable favors for management?

mercys ghost
03-24-2019, 05:49 PM
It is my opinion that we do need a union, the very same reason that you don't.

From what I've gathered is you have changed user names and moved on, why do you still care and act as though you are doing questionable favors for management?




Yea, got locked out of my other account. That is an interesting story in its own right. So yea, had to move on. I care for the same reasons I have always stated...nothing has changed. Just trying to educate myself here, by getting opinions and getting the big picture through the eyes of others.

Check Complete
03-24-2019, 06:02 PM
Yea, got locked out of my other account. That is an interesting story in its own right. So yea, had to move on. I care for the same reasons I have always stated...nothing has changed. Just trying to educate myself here, by getting opinions and getting the big picture through the eyes of others.

This pilot group has grown and as such big corporate interests look after the company and not the employee group, as they should. If and when something occurs to a pilot or a crew they are at the company's mercy(iful) fate as to what happens. What happens is what is good for the company and the pilot or crew maybe sacrificed as an expense. The pilot or crew has nothing to fall back on but their own wallet for protection.

A single person going after a massive corproration.

An organization that has the pilot group as their first priority just as the corporate lawyers have the company as the first priority.

There is a reason all of upper management have fully vested legal contracts, they protect the company and the person.

Why can't we have the same thing and a strong organization that wants us to have that too?

mercys ghost
03-24-2019, 06:08 PM
This pilot group has grown and as such big corporate interests look after the company and not the employee group, as they should. If and when something occurs to a pilot or a crew they are at the company's mercy(iful) fate as to what happens. What happens is what is good for the company and the pilot or crew maybe sacrificed as an expense. The pilot or crew has nothing to fall back on but their own wallet for protection.

A single person going after a massive corproration.

An organization that has the pilot group as their first priority just as the corporate lawyers have the company as the first priority.

There is a reason all of upper management have fully vested legal contracts, they protect the company and the person.

Why can't we have the same thing and a strong organization that wants us to have that too?


There is nothing that says you can't. Only thing stopping it is your pilot group, not your management. Whats the core reason why there is not a union representing you? This is not something you can blame on your management.

Check Complete
03-24-2019, 06:21 PM
There is nothing that says you can't. Only thing stopping it is your pilot group, not your management. Whats the core reason why there is not a union representing you? This is not something you can blame on your management.

I can only speculate the high pressure koolaid enema given to new hires and that most people plan to soon move on and don't care.

And never for get the target you wear if you are out spoken and how a person has no protection or is an advocate for representation.

There's a reason why the company has a "About Unions" on the online banner?

mercys ghost
03-24-2019, 06:25 PM
I can only speculate the high pressure koolaid enema given to new hires and that most people plan to soon move on and don't care.

And never for get the target you wear if you are out spoken and how a person has no protection or is an advocate for representation.

There's a reason why the company has a "About Unions" on the online banner?


How long have you been flying for them?

Check Complete
03-24-2019, 06:28 PM
How long have you been flying for them?

Much longer than the time of your new user name.

mercys ghost
03-24-2019, 06:29 PM
Much longer than the time of your new user name.


No seriously, how long you been flying? No need to be sarcastic, trying to get an idea of what you have been through.

Melit
03-25-2019, 05:33 AM
To have a real contract, absolutely!

Not really fooling anybody fate....

Because you can’t move on and need protection! But you have a lucrative software company so you should be fine. Do you pay your employees a livable wage?

Nevjets
03-25-2019, 12:15 PM
You already know the answers to those questions....Hopefully I don't have to spell this out for you.

No, I don’t know. Or at least I don’t remember you ever telling me. So what is your reason for wanting Skywest pilots to remain non-union? What is it you get out of that?



There is nothing that says you can't. Only thing stopping it is your pilot group, not your management. Whats the core reason why there is not a union representing you? This is not something you can blame on your management.


Last time there was an active campaign and vote, Skywest management was actively undermining it, to the point of being put under an injunction by a federal judge. All new hires get the kool aid speech during indoctrination and that propaganda continues. So let’s not pretend like Skywest management is hands off when it comes to their pilots line of thinking about unionizing.

Meow1215
03-25-2019, 12:50 PM
No seriously, how long you been flying? No need to be sarcastic, trying to get an idea of what you have been through.

Long enough to know better than to give OO management a target for where to start looking for and eliminating pro-union pilots .

Check Complete
03-25-2019, 01:53 PM
Because you can’t move on and need protection! But you have a lucrative software company so you should be fine. Do you pay your employees a livable wage?

The few times I've needed help I have some contacts that I turn too and yes I pay them very well and I do some work for them sometimes in trade. If you are looking for work you are not qualified as I require my side help to not be living in their mom"s basement.

I think you would fit in better at maybe Game Stop or Best Buy?
Good Luck!

mercys ghost
03-25-2019, 04:18 PM
No, I don’t know. Or at least I don’t remember you ever telling me. So what is your reason for wanting Skywest pilots to remain non-union? What is it you get out of that?










Last time there was an active campaign and vote, Skywest management was actively undermining it, to the point of being put under an injunction by a federal judge. All new hires get the kool aid speech during indoctrination and that propaganda continues. So let’s not pretend like Skywest management is hands off when it comes to their pilots line of thinking about unionizing.

Stock price. More growth, more revenue, continued contract renewals.



So, in other words, you are saying the SkyWest pilots are a bunch of spineless, scared individuals chugging management kool aid? Is that why you feel a union needs to come to the rescue?

mercys ghost
03-25-2019, 04:20 PM
Long enough to know better than to give OO management a target for where to start looking for and eliminating pro-union pilots .


So, how long is long enough? Since Check won't answer, maybe you can help out.

Check Complete
03-25-2019, 04:41 PM
I've been around since the first Teamsters vote. Management definitely singles out union promoters and yes they have colluded with union votes.

The mailing list for a union vote was filled with numerous mistakes as provided by the company. Years ago my vote was sent to my parents address.

"Talk to your co-workers about remaining Union Free. Let them know that the company is non-union and wants to remain non-union."

It makes perfect sense that the company doesn't want a union. Which is why it makes perfect sense for the employee group to have a union. We are (I think) the 5th largest pilot group in the country and the only one to not have real representation.

Can anyone really say SW is the only place doing it right and all the others are wrong?

mercys ghost
03-25-2019, 04:51 PM
I've been around since the first Teamsters vote. Management definitely singles out union promoters and yes they have colluded with union votes.

The mailing list for a union vote was filled with numerous mistakes as provided by the company. Years ago my vote was sent to my parents address.

"Talk to your co-workers about remaining Union Free. Let them know that the company is non-union and wants to remain non-union."

It makes perfect sense that the company doesn't want a union. Which is why it makes perfect sense for the employee group to have a union. We are (I think) the 5th largest pilot group in the country and the only one to not have real representation.

Can anyone really say SW is the only place doing it right and all the others are wrong?


Channeling my inner Bill Clinton..."That depends on what your definition of wrong, is". As far as the regional airline sector is concerned, they obviously have been doing something right. Granted it is impossible to know if the success of the airline has anything to do with not having any work groups unionized. However, it is the elephant in the room that cannot be ignored, and has to be considered.



Lets say tomorrow you guys voted in a union. In your own opinion, and I understand it is an opinion, do you think it would be business as usual from that point on?

Check Complete
03-25-2019, 04:55 PM
I think there would be at least 2 years or more of contention and bitterness. But I think the gains would be worth it and I'm willing to have some pain for long term gain.

But of course, I don't speak for all?

mercys ghost
03-25-2019, 05:01 PM
I think there would be at least 2 years or more of contention and bitterness. But I think the gains would be worth it and I'm willing to have some pain for long term gain.

But of course, I don't speak for all?


Yea, I would agree on the contention and bitterness. I think however it would stretch out for a long long time. Because you would have both sides trying to show each other who has the upper hand. Kind of a "I will show you who is boss" tug of war. Hard to say....

Check Complete
03-25-2019, 05:14 PM
The only provision is that the company is going to have to have another contract in the next few years to lure fresh talent and that will force their hand to agree to a new and competitive contract. If there were to be a down turn economy for years, that would drag things out. If that were the case and we had a union the present contract and policies would be the de-facto agreement and forces the company to hold to the rules.

Nevjets
03-25-2019, 05:19 PM
Stock price. More growth, more revenue, continued contract renewals.



So, in other words, you are saying the SkyWest pilots are a bunch of spineless, scared individuals chugging management kool aid? Is that why you feel a union needs to come to the rescue?

Nope, never said that. Just making the point that management is not hands off when it comes to their work groups possibly unionizing. As been shown here from other posters, management persuades new hires and continues to do so on the website. Along with federal injunctions against them when acting against rules during organizing campaigns. If it wasn’t for the deep pockets of ALPA, Skywest management would have never seen the inside of a court room, let alone and federal injunction placed on them.


So, you are strictly a shareholder. I completely understand your position. It’s as rational as pilots being in a union. Management has a fiduciary to you, the shareholder. So it only makes sense that someone also has the pilot’s fiduciary responsibility to represent their best interests. As it is now, if there was another DD incident, that pilot would also have to spend more than $100k after being fired in order to get his job back. Almost everyone would not have the ability to fight an unjust firing like he did, UNLESS there was a union that represented them and kept them from being unjustly fired to begin with.

To answer your last question, I honestly believe that ALPA brings a whole lot more than a contract and representation. We all know that the RLA is stacked against pilots. But the best thing about ALPA, the RLA cannot do anything about, advocating for safety, security, and pilot assistance.

Nevjets
03-25-2019, 05:25 PM
I think there would be at least 2 years or more of contention and bitterness. But I think the gains would be worth it and I'm willing to have some pain for long term gain.

But of course, I don't speak for all?


Typically things don’t become contentious unless there has been foot dragging for years on a contract negotiation. Skywest management has had over ten years learning how to do business with unions. Both the ASA and XJT MECs enjoyed favorable relationships with management, more so on the XJT side. But it was never contentious or bitter despite the vast differences in opinions.

My guess is that there will be a honeymoon period before some foot dragging. Just like it was when JetBlue and Virgin first unionized, after some foot dragging and union publicly complaining, both sides come to some kind of mutual agreement.

mercys ghost
03-25-2019, 05:28 PM
Nope, never said that. Just making the point that management is not hands off when it comes to their work groups possibly unionizing. As been shown here from other posters, management persuades new hires and continues to do so on the website. Along with federal injunctions against them when acting against rules during organizing campaigns. If it wasn’t for the deep pockets of ALPA, Skywest management would have never seen the inside of a court room, let alone and federal injunction placed on them.


So, you are strictly a shareholder. I completely understand your position. It’s as rational as pilots being in a union. Management has a fiduciary to you, the shareholder. So it only makes sense that someone also has the pilot’s fiduciary responsibility to represent their best interests. As it is now, if there was another DD incident, that pilot would also have to spend more than $100k after being fired in order to get his job back. Almost everyone would not have the ability to fight an unjust firing like he did, UNLESS there was a union that represented them and kept them from being unjustly fired to begin with.

To answer your last question, I honestly believe that ALPA brings a whole lot more than a contract and representation. We all know that the RLA is stacked against pilots. But the best thing about ALPA, the RLA cannot do anything about, advocating for safety, security, and pilot assistance.


Is there any hard data out there on how many jobs have been saved from unjust termination by having assistance from union representation?

word302
03-25-2019, 09:05 PM
Stock price. More growth, more revenue, continued contract renewals.



So, in other words, you are saying the SkyWest pilots are a bunch of spineless, scared individuals chugging management kool aid? Is that why you feel a union needs to come to the rescue?

You assume a union would keep all those things from happening.

Check Complete
03-25-2019, 09:50 PM
Is there any hard data out there on how many jobs have been saved from unjust termination by having assistance from union representation?

I think the answer to that question is probably nobody really knows? But you probably know that too? It would stand to reason that if a pilot was to be terminated by the company and had real legal counsel representation there would be far less company attempts.

Think about it, the company can do just about anything it wants because it knows there's about one in a thousand people like DD that is going to fight back. What about the guy that got terminated because it was suspected that he was intoxicated? The local authorities dropped all the charges. Made the headlines and he was terminated. Employee review was to be reinstated but was still terminated. Had no legal ability to fight back and his career is ruined. Of course nobody will ever know, but I think just the threat of available dedicated legal counsel, he'd probably still be here?

What about his rights just so the company can say they fired the suspected culprit? Bottom line is that pilots are getting terminated for mistakes and yes some of the mistakes are bad. A dedicated counsel may just be able to negotiate some retraining instead of termination?

What about the resent disaster for the JB pilots accused of their crimes? What would they be able to protect themselves from, legally, without resources from their union. I'm not saying what may or may not have happened but how would it be to face this situation without a true counsel provided to you. I would imagine self hired counsel for something of this nature would want upwards of 50K as a retainer?

mercys ghost
03-26-2019, 04:41 AM
You assume a union would keep all those things from happening.


You are correct, it is an assumption. However, I do have hard data to show that the one non-union carrier regional airline is miles ahead of any of its competition. If your management is doing, and has done the things you say, do you honestly think for one second they would be willing to continue with the same business plan if a union were on property? I feel pretty comfortable when my assumption, and plenty of info to back it up.

mercys ghost
03-26-2019, 04:52 AM
I think the answer to that question is probably nobody really knows? But you probably know that too? It would stand to reason that if a pilot was to be terminated by the company and had real legal counsel representation there would be far less company attempts.

Think about it, the company can do just about anything it wants because it knows there's about one in a thousand people like DD that is going to fight back. What about the guy that got terminated because it was suspected that he was intoxicated? The local authorities dropped all the charges. Made the headlines and he was terminated. Employee review was to be reinstated but was still terminated. Had no legal ability to fight back and his career is ruined. Of course nobody will ever know, but I think just the threat of available dedicated legal counsel, he'd probably still be here?

What about his rights just so the company can say they fired the suspected culprit? Bottom line is that pilots are getting terminated for mistakes and yes some of the mistakes are bad. A dedicated counsel may just be able to negotiate some retraining instead of termination?

What about the resent disaster for the JB pilots accused of their crimes? What would they be able to protect themselves from, legally, without resources from their union. I'm not saying what may or may not have happened but how would it be to face this situation without a true counsel provided to you. I would imagine self hired counsel for something of this nature would want upwards of 50K as a retainer?


Anyone who is employed by a company runs the risks of termination, and that is not unique to pilots. The recurring argument I keep seeing is that having a union gives you an army of attorneys at your side. You are saying these guys cannot afford an attorney, but can afford to dump money into a union?

Meow1215
03-26-2019, 05:59 AM
You are correct, it is an assumption. However, I do have hard data to show that the one non-union carrier regional airline is miles ahead of any of its competition. If your management is doing, and has done the things you say, do you honestly think for one second they would be willing to continue with the same business plan if a union were on property? I feel pretty comfortable when my assumption, and plenty of info to back it up.

Do tell, that is allot of claims to back up.

amcnd
03-26-2019, 06:10 AM
Do tell, that is allot of claims to back up.

He’s probably talking about Air Wisconsin. Bug difference is they are privately held. They have no shareholders to account for. Just as long as they make a .0001% profit all is well...

Nevjets
03-26-2019, 07:49 AM
Is there any hard data out there on how many jobs have been saved from unjust termination by having assistance from union representation?


There is at least one, DD. It took him many months and tens of thousands of dollars to get his job back. It’s reasonable to assume that almost no one who has been fired at Skywest can afford to spend that kind of money while out of work.

My point is that it doesn’t have to be this way for any pilot. So having it happen just once is one too many when there is a feasible alternative that also brings other value on top of just having legal representation.


Anyone who is employed by a company runs the risks of termination, and that is not unique to pilots. The recurring argument I keep seeing is that having a union gives you an army of attorneys at your side. You are saying these guys cannot afford an attorney, but can afford to dump money into a union?


Just for the record, my specific argument for ALPA is foremost the safety, security, and pilot assistance advocacy that that organization brings to the pilots. That’s not to say there also isn’t much value in having a contract legally recognized by the NMB and the representation that comes along with that. It’s not like having representation is nothing.

It’s no different than your auto insurance. If someone T-bones you at no fault of your own, your insurance company will represent your case in front of an arbitrator against the attorneys of the other driver’s insurance company. Would you rather have to either represent yourself against attorneys from the other side or have to pay out of pocket for your own attorney? Or would you rather pay insurance premiums in case you find yourself in that situation? You can afford the insurance premiums every month but most people cannot afford the out of pocket expense to pay for an attorney, especially if you are out of a job until you can win and get it back.

You can think of ALPA as an insurance policy. The big difference is that the ALPA insurance company doesn’t just represent you if you find yourself in need of representing. They also advocate for your safety and security at all levels and agencies of government.

You are correct, it is an assumption. However, I do have hard data to show that the one non-union carrier regional airline is miles ahead of any of its competition. If your management is doing, and has done the things you say, do you honestly think for one second they would be willing to continue with the same business plan if a union were on property? I feel pretty comfortable when my assumption, and plenty of info to back it up.


Skywest management has had years dealing with pilot unions. It wasn’t contentious and they didn’t change their business plans. The main difference is that with a union, the pilots now get a seat at the adult table to have the adult conversations. It didn’t mean that the two side always agreed. Many times they agreed to disagree and the subject was sent to an arbitrator. If anything, it takes contention out of the picture because both sides know they have a dispute resolution mechanism. Things become more professional when disagreeing knowing that they can send it to a third party for a unbiased outcome. Skywest management are very smart and savvy, which is not necessarily a bad thing. So they are not going to do anything rash just because pilots now have more of a say in their QOL. It simply changes the relationship of one that is more of a professional type, more hands off, attorneys dealing with attorneys when needed. And management dealing with MEC reps when working out other issues. It’s in everyone’s best interest to work together. What you have without a union is basically a one way street.

mercys ghost
03-26-2019, 03:53 PM
Do tell, that is allot of claims to back up.


What do you want to know?

Meow1215
03-26-2019, 07:10 PM
What do you want to know?

How about access to 25% of that hard data your talking about?

mercys ghost
03-27-2019, 04:33 AM
How about access to 25% of that hard data your talking about?


Are you that far out of the loop on the regional industry? SkyWest is miles ahead of any regional competitor. If you need me to explain that hard data to you, then I would recommend spending less time posting here, and more time doing research.

word302
03-27-2019, 05:00 AM
Are you that far out of the loop on the regional industry? SkyWest is miles ahead of any regional competitor. If you need me to explain that hard data to you, then I would recommend spending less time posting here, and more time doing research.

Again you assuming that their success is due to being non union, and not just having a brilliant management group. The relationship between union and management doesn't habit l have to be adversarial. Herb Kelleher put up the funds to get southwest's union started.

mercys ghost
03-27-2019, 05:16 AM
Again you assuming that their success is due to being non union, and not just having a brilliant management group. The relationship between union and management doesn't habit l have to be adversarial. Herb Kelleher put up the funds to get southwest's union started.


As I stated before, nobody knows if the success the airline has is because it does not have a union. However, fact shows they are successful without one. That is my point.

word302
03-27-2019, 06:06 AM
As I stated before, nobody knows if the success the airline has is because it does not have a union. However, fact shows they are successful without one. That is my point.

Well it would be silly to assume that the place would just spiral downhill with a union on property.

Nevjets
03-27-2019, 03:07 PM
As I stated before, nobody knows if the success the airline has is because it does not have a union. However, fact shows they are successful without one. That is my point.


Yes, there is one successful airline without a union, Skywest. And there is at least that many successful airlines that have unionized pilots.

We get it, you are simply a stockholder. We get that your interests in Skywest probably differ than Skywest pilots, especially when it comes to unionizing. Nothing wrong with that but it goes to the heart of one of my points, that each side should have its best interests at heart. And an NMB recognized bargaining agent is the best way to have the pilots interest at heart.

Nevjets
03-27-2019, 03:09 PM
JUMPSEAT COUNCIL DISCUSSES EDUCATIONAL TOOLS, PLANS FOR AIR SAFETY FORUM
More than 30 pilot representatives are attending this week's meeting of the Jumpseat Council, a part of the ALPA Air Safety Organization's (ASO) Aviation Jumpseat group. This morning, the council discussed Jumpseat 101, a standardized training program projected to be available in 2020 that is intended to educate future pilot jumpseat representatives about their responsibilities. The program will supplement other ALPA jumpseat resources including the website, the instructional video on jumpseat etiquette, the jumpseat guide, and a future jumpseat app for mobile devices.
The group conducted a brainstorming session to consider content for the upcoming ALPA Air Safety Forum, scheduled for July 15–18. In addition, Aviation Jumpseat chair Capt. Rich Odbert (FDX) briefed the group on jumpseating as it relates to other ASO functions and union activities.
The meeting, which runs through Thursday at ALPA's Herndon, Va. Conference Center, is moderated by Jumpseat Council chair Capt. Bob Spadea (UAL) and vice chair Capt. Keith McClanahan (JBU). The Jumpseat Council consists of the Master Executive Council Jumpseat Committee chairs from ALPA's 33 pilot groups in the United States and Canada.

FROM THE PRESIDENT: SAFETY QUESTIONS MUST BE ANSWERED
In case you missed it, the following message from ALPA President Joe DePete was distributed to members on March 26:
While flying remains the safest mode of transportation in the world—and ALPA pilots have been integral to this accomplishment—the recent tragedies of Lion Air Flight 610, Atlas Air Flight 3591, and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 remind us that there is still urgent work to do in safeguarding our skies in both passenger and cargo operations.
ALPA deeply respects the thorough accident investigations that are underway. This proven, unbiased, and objective investigatory process has been developed at the terrible cost of lives lost, and it is the most effective and efficient means to collect the factual data needed to drive regulatory and policy changes for a safer future. As ALPA members know, our union has been instrumental in shifting the U.S., Canadian, and international airline industry toward a proactive approach to improving safety that will prevent accidents before they occur. While it has been reported that there are similarities between the tragedies involving Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines, we must remember that those investigations are still ongoing—no final findings or conclusions have been identified. As we allow the accident investigators to do their work, it's clear that the tragedies have raised extremely important questions about our industry's foundational processes regarding aircraft design, certification, and the minimum pilot training, flight experience, and qualification standards that exist globally outside the United States.
These issues and others will be discussed and debated throughout our aviation community, including by the newly announced Department of Transportation Special Committee, which will review the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) certification process for new aircraft, including the Boeing 737 MAX. ALPA will be engaged and active during these discussions in the United States and Canada, as well as at the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and the International Federation of Air Line Pilots' Associations (IFALPA). As the world's largest nongovernmental aviation safety organization, we have a vested interest in ensuring that all relevant issues are adequately investigated and that safety enhancements are identified and implemented through an open and objective process.
ALPA's national leaders, members of the Air Safety Organization, pilots, and professional staff are in contact with U.S., Canadian, and international regulatory agencies, airline managements, aircraft manufacturers, other aviation safety stakeholder groups, and other pilot unions to urge collaboration in what must be an industry-wide effort to ensure confidence in the safety of our system.
We know airline pilots in the United States are trained for life––we've raised the bar for the industry around world. Based on the U.S. safety record and proven success of the FAA's pilot qualification, training, and experience regulations, I've sent a letter to the International Civil Aviation Organization calling for a global review of pilot training and qualifications. ALPA is committed to enhancing air safety worldwide—in pilot training and every other aspect of aviation.
ALPA is actively engaged, and we will keep you informed. Our ASO stands ready to work with all parties—regulators, manufacturers, and airlines—to learn from these recent tragedies and improve safety for our passengers, crews, and cargo.

FLYING THE LINE: EPISODE 3 AVAILABLE NOW!
Flying the Line is ALPA's podcast that dives into the exciting, and sometimes tragic, history of the largest pilots' union in the world. In Episode 3, learn how the deadly practice of "pilot pushing" played a huge role in Capt. David Behncke's drive to organize his fellow brother pilots.
Subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Spotify, and other popular platforms (search "Flying the Line") to be the first to know when new episodes are released! Have you enjoyed the podcast? Give it a five-star rating and share it with your fellow pilots, family, and friends today.

mercys ghost
03-27-2019, 03:46 PM
Well it would be silly to assume that the place would just spiral downhill with a union on property.




Silly to you maybe....but, as of right now nobody can say it would or would not.

word302
03-27-2019, 09:21 PM
Silly to you maybe....but, as of right now nobody can say it would or would not.

I'm saying it would not. Your claim is completely ludicrous and unfounded.

mercys ghost
03-28-2019, 04:37 AM
I'm saying it would not. Your claim is completely ludicrous and unfounded.


Having an opinion is a great thing, don't cha think? My claim however has weight behind it, where yours....well.....you really have nothing.



If the day comes that you ever are unionized, then I suppose you may or may not have something to back up your claim. Until then however, the reality is the airline has been successful as a non union carrier.

word302
03-28-2019, 06:03 AM
Having an opinion is a great thing, don't cha think? My claim however has weight behind it, where yours....well.....you really have nothing.



If the day comes that you ever are unionized, then I suppose you may or may not have something to back up your claim. Until then however, the reality is the airline has been successful as a non union carrier.

Your claim is idiotic. The fact that the airline is successful without a union proves the likelihood that it will be successful with one. Not the other way around. Source: every airline that had unionized.

mercys ghost
03-28-2019, 04:59 PM
Your claim is idiotic. The fact that the airline is successful without a union proves the likelihood that it will be successful with one. Not the other way around. Source: every airline that had unionized.


Hmmmm, lets see. Lets compare notes, shall we?


Please name me those non unionized airlines that have been successful without a union.


Please name those unionized airlines that have failed and no longer exist.



My claim is not idiotic, and that is your emotional logic talking. Put your feelings aside, and be realistic.

word302
03-28-2019, 05:22 PM
Hmmmm, lets see. Lets compare notes, shall we?


Please name me those non unionized airlines that have been successful without a union.


Please name those unionized airlines that have failed and no longer exist.



My claim is not idiotic, and that is your emotional logic talking. Put your feelings aside, and be realistic.

You do realize that every airline in existence today was at one point non-union, don't you? Again, you are the one making claims with no facts to back them up. As usual.

mercys ghost
03-28-2019, 05:29 PM
You do realize that every airline in existence today was at one point non-union, don't you? Again, you are the one making claims with no facts to back them up. As usual.


This statement does not help your claim. Kind of proves my point that adding a union can lead to failure doesn't it? You have this backwards. You are making claims you cannot back up with facts.

Nevjets
03-28-2019, 08:49 PM
This statement does not help your claim. Kind of proves my point that adding a union can lead to failure doesn't it? You have this backwards. You are making claims you cannot back up with facts.


We get, you are a non-pilot stock owner on a pilot board arguing against the pilots unionizing. Like I said, your position on this is as rational as the pilot wanting to unionize.

Stockholder (you) = against any of your company’s work groups unionizing. We get it.

mercys ghost
03-29-2019, 04:30 AM
We get, you are a non-pilot stock owner on a pilot board arguing against the pilots unionizing. Like I said, your position on this is as rational as the pilot wanting to unionize.

Stockholder (you) = against any of your company’s work groups unionizing. We get it.


You may get it, others......not so much.

word302
03-29-2019, 06:01 AM
This statement does not help your claim. Kind of proves my point that adding a union can lead to failure doesn't it? You have this backwards. You are making claims you cannot back up with facts.

Let's see. Frontier and Jet Blue are the latest carries to unionize. They're doing pretty awful aren't they?

mercys ghost
03-29-2019, 03:41 PM
Let's see. Frontier and Jet Blue are the latest carries to unionize. They're doing pretty awful aren't they?


Not as bad as Comair. And how long have those two carriers been in business in comparison to SkyWest? They don't have forty plus years of history in their books. When they hit that milestone we can talk about it.



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