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View Full Version : About the process


Juanpilot
11-14-2018, 10:42 AM
First of all thanks for your attention. I want to know if someone can help me with information about the process of been hired. Sim, test, med exams etc. Also Iíve been living abroad working and studying for a while , i have a 4 and a half years degree on international affairs (of course from a foreign university), should this be a problem on their preferences? Do i have a good chance to get hired? Many thanks .

Profile.
SIC A320 family = 3400 h
SIC A330. =1000 h
4 1/2 yrs degree international affairs
English and spanish proficient


viking767
11-15-2018, 05:19 PM
Are you a US Citizen or Green Card holder?

PRS Guitars
11-15-2018, 05:36 PM
I donít think youíre competitive. Your total time is low, but more importantly, you have zero Turbine PIC. Do you even have any PIC let alone TPIC? Or did you do some kind of multi crew liscense and then straight to the Airbus?


Sliceback
11-15-2018, 06:45 PM
^^ and no US experience? No 121 time?

Laker24
11-15-2018, 08:23 PM
First of all thanks for your attention. I want to know if someone can help me with information about the process of been hired. Sim, test, med exams etc. Also Iíve been living abroad working and studying for a while , i have a 4 and a half years degree on international affairs (of course from a foreign university), should this be a problem on their preferences? Do i have a good chance to get hired? Many thanks .

Profile.
SIC A320 family = 3400 h
SIC A330. =1000 h
4 1/2 yrs degree international affairs
English and spanish proficient

You should apply as soon as possible. Update your application frequently. You clearly have a lot of airline and international experience. The only problem might be a lack of PIC time. But there are many pilots hired at the major airlines without PIC time. They also like to hire people from different backgrounds. Donít listen to the haters on here. Good luck!

Sliceback
11-16-2018, 06:23 AM
Itís not hate. He asked what his odds were.

Heís competing for about 1/8th (12%) of the hiring spots. His resume is weak. Iíve seen hundreds of them. Might he be hired? Yes. Likely? No.

If a U.S. legacy airline is his goal heíd probably be better off getting a U.S. regional job instead of continuing at his current job.

Juanpilot
11-16-2018, 11:49 AM
Thanks Laker24, im still getting my green card. But ill do it ASAP.

Juanpilot
11-16-2018, 11:54 AM
Thanks for your feetback, does flying for an airline with all their aircraft been N registered counts as 121 time or not? I understand we are under FAA rules. Also next year im probably transitioning to captain to start build hours as 320 PIC, so im expecting to have at least 1000 h as PIC when i get my Green Card.

Edpilot23
11-16-2018, 02:04 PM
Juan, trying to apply to AA without even a work permit or green card is a little pretentious, you should also know by now what kind of operation Avianca does. If you fly N registration aircraft for a foreign carrier you are under 129 Which is not exactly 121, very different.
Even with some PIC turbine time your best route is (once you get green card, and FAA ATP), to go the regional or LCC route and build some 121 time. PIC will help once you obtain all of the above. Not to mention a 4 year US accredited college degree (highly recommended).
I recommend you get in touch with your buddies ex-Ava who work in the US to get a better insight, which by the way will help you if you are ACDAC and supported the strike last year, otherwise you can forget about it.
Good luck, feel free to PM me any time...

Juanpilot
11-16-2018, 03:04 PM
Juan, trying to apply to AA without even a work permit or green card is a little pretentious, you should also know by now what kind of operation Avianca does. If you fly N registration aircraft for a foreign carrier you are under 129 Which is not exactly 121, very different.
Even with some PIC turbine time your best route is (once you get green card, and FAA ATP), to go the regional or LCC route and build some 121 time. PIC will help once you obtain all of the above. Not to mention a 4 year US accredited college degree (highly recommended).
I recommend you get in touch with your buddies ex-Ava who work in the US to get a better insight, which by the way will help you if you are ACDAC and supported the strike last year, otherwise you can forget about it.
Good luck, feel free to PM me any time...

Thanks for your answer, im just exploring all my possibilities , thats why im asking . Of course im ACDAC and participate in the 54 days strike against our crappie administration. Once again thanks so much for your point of view

CareerSO
11-17-2018, 12:55 AM
I've seen folks mention going to a regional or LCC to get the 121 time. From a major's point of view is either of these paths better? (I know some WO regionals have flows but i'm guessing most overseas experienced pilots, especially captains can't wait for the flow to get back to a legacy carrier).

Also, is there a magic number of 121 hours AA looks for?

Arado 234
11-17-2018, 01:23 AM
Juan, trying to apply to AA without even a work permit or green card is a little pretentious, you should also know by now what kind of operation Avianca does. If you fly N registration aircraft for a foreign carrier you are under 129 Which is not exactly 121, very different.
Even with some PIC turbine time your best route is (once you get green card, and FAA ATP), to go the regional or LCC route and build some 121 time. PIC will help once you obtain all of the above. Not to mention a 4 year US accredited college degree (highly recommended).
I recommend you get in touch with your buddies ex-Ava who work in the US to get a better insight, which by the way will help you if you are ACDAC and supported the strike last year, otherwise you can forget about it.
Good luck, feel free to PM me any time...

I kinda disagree. A foreign airline carrier is not 121, but it is an airline carrier. Thatís what Airlines look for. Your total time is low, but you have experience already with medium/heavy planes. It doesn't hurt to try. With your experience you should be able to cherry pick your regional carrier. Look for the quickest upgrade, $, base, qol etc. Maybe staying at Avianca is a better choice (upgrade, qol, etc)? Only you can answer those questions.

When you convert your licence to FAA, find out if they can transfer your sic type too. There was a way to do it years ago, but I am not sure if the Feds still do it.

sigler
11-17-2018, 03:48 AM
I've seen folks mention going to a regional or LCC to get the 121 time. From a major's point of view is either of these paths better? (I know some WO regionals have flows but i'm guessing most overseas experienced pilots, especially captains can't wait for the flow to get back to a legacy carrier).

Also, is there a magic number of 121 hours AA looks for?

Both would give you 121 time, but I would say a Regional is better for the fact it will give you 121 TPIC time a lot sooner. However, if your application is not picked out of the pile by one of the majors, it's better to wait at an LCC than most Regionals... So both have pros and cons. I would go with a Regional initially though.



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