Airline Pilot Forums

Airline Pilot Forums was designed to be a community where working airline pilots can share ideas and information about the aviation field. In the forum you will find information about major and regional airline carriers, career training, interview and job seeker help, finance, and living the airline pilot lifestyle.




scottschwerd
11-24-2018, 12:31 PM
Hi everyone! I'm new here and just wanted some opinions on which of these routes you would pick if you're trying to go from 0 hours to ATP... or if you would suggest an entirely different route!

Here's a quick run down of my background. I'm currently a senior graduating with a degree in financial economics this spring and have got decent offers to work for banks in NCY but have come to realize how miserable a lot of these finance workers are and have always loved flying so want to pursue this instead! I'm graduating with a 3.97 gpa in a total of 3 years and want to know which path I should take to become a commercial pilot. I will be graduating undergrad with zero debt so that will not be a factor.

Option 1. Part 61 school that will probably take 2.5 - 3 years and will get another major in professional pilot. Probably costs around $60k. I could also go to the school and not get the professional pilot major and would instead be a CFI much sooner making money and would be cheaper. Would it even be worth it to get the professional pilot degree? Like would make me more competitive?

Option 2. American Airlines Cadet Academy (if accepted) this will cost around $80k-$90k and will guarantee me interviews with their 3 subsidiary companies.

Option 3. ATP flight school

Or if you have other advice I'm all ears!

Thanks!


Kstoves
11-24-2018, 12:56 PM
You have a bachelors degree and a high GPA and your young. Go air national guard

deftone
11-24-2018, 02:24 PM
with a 3.97 you could take your pick of which one of the military branches you wish to fly for. Certainly the most cost effective way and will get your fast-tracked directly to a major.


kingsnake2
11-24-2018, 02:39 PM
Hi everyone! I'm new here and just wanted some opinions on which of these routes you would pick if you're trying to go from 0 hours to ATP... or if you would suggest an entirely different route!

Here's a quick run down of my background. I'm currently a senior graduating with a degree in financial economics this spring and have got decent offers to work for banks in NCY but have come to realize how miserable a lot of these finance workers are and have always loved flying so want to pursue this instead! I'm graduating with a 3.97 gpa in a total of 3 years and want to know which path I should take to become a commercial pilot. I will be graduating undergrad with zero debt so that will not be a factor.

Option 1. Part 61 school that will probably take 2.5 - 3 years and will get another major in professional pilot. Probably costs around $60k. I could also go to the school and not get the professional pilot major and would instead be a CFI much sooner making money and would be cheaper. Would it even be worth it to get the professional pilot degree? Like would make me more competitive?

Option 2. American Airlines Cadet Academy (if accepted) this will cost around $80k-$90k and will guarantee me interviews with their 3 subsidiary companies.

Option 3. ATP flight school

Or if you have other advice I'm all ears!

Thanks!

US Aviation has a 0-MEI program for $74,495 with the same financing program as ATP. Price includes check rides, books, and supplies unlike ATP. Training in Denton, Texas.

A degree generally won't matter that much to the regionals, but some majors like Southwest still have a strong preference for degrees. You could still get a degree later (online or local college).

JetJock77
11-24-2018, 04:50 PM
US Aviation has a 0-MEI program for $74,495 with the same financing program as ATP. Price includes check rides, books, and supplies unlike ATP. Training in Denton, Texas.

A degree generally won't matter that much to the regionals, but some majors like Southwest still have a strong preference for degrees. You could still get a degree later (online or local college).

Option 4 International Aero Academy in Lakeland $50,000 and you can interview with United Express operator Trans States Airlines prior to beginning training. If accepted start getting pass travel privileges on United, increased CFI pay and join Trans States in about 26 months with 3 months seniority

TKOwnedU5
11-25-2018, 12:06 PM
You have a bachelors degree and a high GPA and your young. Go air national guard



ANG or AFR donít they both prefer someone with some flying hours if not a ppl? Iím 23 years old, graduated with a bachelors degree last May with a 3.5 gpa/honors. I was told to call back with more flight hours when I spoke with a recruiter. I have 0 hours flying.


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Xjsar
11-25-2018, 12:55 PM
ANG or AFR donít they both prefer someone with some flying hours if not a ppl? Iím 23 years old, graduated with a bachelors degree last May with a 3.5 gpa/honors. I was told to call back with more flight hours when I spoke with a recruiter. I have 0 hours flying.


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I am not a recruiter, nor a pilot. However I have looked at that possibility. Alot of the units PREFER guys who have at least a PPL. However some units dont require it. I spoke with the 161st in phx and they said, they prefer PPLs but not necessary. They're looking more at the individual, their personality, traits, how they get along with others, and their desire to get someone who will want to stay for a long period of time.


If your interested in the ANG AFR, find the contact information and contact the squadron directly. They can give you more information about their wants needs and desires better than a recruiter. Often times, they'll host an open house so to speak so applicants can meet the rest of the guys and they can get familiar with you and see on a very basic level if youd be a suitable fit for the squadron. You can also sometimes, request to get a tour during a drill weekend and see what it's all about, while getting to know the guys there.

sourdough44
11-26-2018, 02:03 PM
To the O poster, no need for any more degree, you need the ‘fast track’ to piloting, if that’s what you want. You could pick the route that your finances allow, often FL or AZ flight schools.

Yes, the Guard or Reserves can be a great option, oftentimes they like some flight experience, or possibly some Guard time. Requirements change over time and with individual units, research to see what’s available. It’s often much different than 30 years ago.

I also would get the ball rolling now, like at least a private pilot ground school course, it all adds up.

joepilot
11-26-2018, 05:04 PM
The Guard or Reserves want to be sure that they are not wasting a pilot training slot on you.

They do not want somebody that routinely gets airsick in a basic trainer.

They want somebody coordinated enough that they can fly a plane.

They want somebody reasonably committed.

A quick private pilots license will show all of these things, and you will probably get offers.

Depending on the aircraft in your unit, you can volunteer for all the flying you can stand.

You will make more than as a CFI, (although I recommend doing that as well), and the airlines look favorably on military pilots.

For an airline career, I would recommend against active duty military, especially Marines or Army.

Joe

Never2Late
11-27-2018, 06:39 AM
I think you mean Part 141, not 61 to get the degree.

My opinion has changed recently, I would say if you want to finish fast and can commit to a schedule similar to college, look at ATP or similar program. I know the criticism is they are "expensive" however they have a system in place and you finish much faster than a Part 61 school. In theory the 61 is cheaper however flying less typically and with less structure adds time to your training and cost. So if you assume a flight school is $10-15k or so more than part 61, you will have your CFI much faster at the full-time school and then you are actually getting paid sooner, to the airlines sooner, upgrading sooner. Time is money especially as a professional pilot, the extra 10-15k you spend getting it done fast, will come back in the long run.

rickair7777
11-27-2018, 06:51 AM
T
For an airline career, I would recommend against active duty military, especially Marines or Army.

Joe

Historically, active duty experience as a pilot has been the most reliable path to good airline employment.

But right now, for a young person in HS or college, the 12-ish years needed to apply, complete training, and serve out the incurred AD obligation will likely put you on the back side of the best airline hiring wave ever. For that reason I would suggest flying in the ANG or USAFR, while progressing your civilian career in parallel.

Re. Joe's comment about the services, if you're airline bound you want to fly fixed-wing aircraft in the military, not helos. If you go AD, USAF is the best bet for that (they have few helos and they are pretty much all-volunteer). USN has plenty of helos, and you might get assigned that involuntarily. USMC has even more helos, and Army is almost all helos. If not USAF, then USN. Navy helo pilots often have the opportunity to work as fixed wing instructors and build enough time for the airlines.

Work is play
11-28-2018, 08:09 PM
Theirs a delta propel program. Iíll be all over this if I was young


https://news.delta.com/delta-propels-next-generation-pilots-through-innovative-career-paths