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View Full Version : Narrowing the carriers down?


scubadiver
11-27-2018, 11:56 AM
It seems to be no mystery that Delta is going to reduce the number of regional carriers. 9E will obviously be one they will keep, but who do you think they will chop? Interested to hear thoughts and rumors and maybe even some facts...


NotMe
11-27-2018, 12:15 PM
I would be amazed if TSH (TSA, GoJet, and Compass) finished out 2019 with no changes. Once they are gone, or at least done with Delta flying, there are three DCI carriers remaining. Who gets those 700ís and 175ís is the big question in my mind. Do the pilots and operating certificates come too? Do they go to the obvious places (700ís to 9E, 175ís to YX) or is DAL still pushing for both airframes at each of the three DCI carriers. How is the flying distributed? Does 9E become an east coast airline, leaving the entire west to OO, or is the plan to have all three cover the entire US?

These are my questions, probably Deltaís too. We will all know for certain by next.... no, we wonít know until we are actually flying the planes on the routes.

KyberCrystal
11-27-2018, 12:17 PM
Take a look inside a Gojet CRJ next chance you get. They maintain them like Delta is going to cancel their contract tomorrow and they don't want to spend money for another regionals benefit. They're airworthy but ratty.


NotMe
11-27-2018, 12:20 PM
Take a look inside a Gojet CRJ next chance you get. They maintain them like Delta is going to cancel their contract tomorrow and they don't want to spend money for another regionals benefit. They're airworthy but ratty.



So maybe Delta replaces them with 900 lites, now that Bombardier is only making one airliner... Iíll bet they can get a screaming deal on those right now!

scubadiver
11-27-2018, 12:32 PM
If any/all of those TSH airlines loses the Delta flying, I would think they would go out of business.

scubadiver
11-27-2018, 12:36 PM
I would also be surprised if the pilots come too. Wouldn't make sense to be doing all this hiring if they were.

theUpsideDown
11-27-2018, 12:40 PM
I would also be surprised if the pilots come too. Wouldn't make sense to be doing all this hiring if they were.

If JF email is correct about our staffing target we could take all the delta owned GoJets planes as fast as they can be put on the certificate and not need another pilot.

NotMe
11-27-2018, 12:50 PM
If JF email is correct about our staffing target we could take all the delta owned GoJets planes as fast as they can be put on the certificate and not need another pilot.



I would say that is the plan - question is, how fast can those 700ís make it through conformity, and at what cost? We were supposed to get more than 3 700ís from EV...

A gander at the YX forums shows them pretty well staffed too...
I assume that MQ could pretty easily absorb the AA owned 175ís from CP.

UA just bought 25 175ís, presumably to replace the G7 planes.

I havenít given much thought to the 145ís operated by AX...

I just donít see TSH lasting too much longer.

KyberCrystal
11-27-2018, 01:08 PM
The Gojet scope is very weak. The only coverage they have if United ends its CPA and Delta takes the CRJs back is the pilots get to merge in to the TSA seniority list and keep their longevity.

Republic wanted to buy Compass real bad earlier this year. The two airlines fit together easily. Aircraft conformity and crew training wouldn't be as big of a deal as other mergers we've seen in the past. I see that being a merger.

That leaves TSA. Old and outdated but I'm sure someone would pick up the scraps.

KSCessnaDriver
11-27-2018, 01:26 PM
I would say that is the plan - question is, how fast can those 700ís make it through conformity, and at what cost? We were supposed to get more than 3 700ís from EV...

A gander at the YX forums shows them pretty well staffed too...
I assume that MQ could pretty easily absorb the AA owned 175ís from CP.

UA just bought 25 175ís, presumably to replace the G7 planes.

I havenít given much thought to the 145ís operated by AX...

I just donít see TSH lasting too much longer.

We were never supposed to get more than 3 700's from EV, because only 3 are owned by DL. The remainder are/were owned by OO. The CR7 is reaching the end at DL, probably only long term kept by OO to do ASE flying.

I would expect YX to get the 175's from CPZ, moved to NYC, allowing OO to take their ball and go home. Then the 700's move over to eventually be replaced by CR9SC/Lite, whatever its called.

SlamClicker
11-27-2018, 02:11 PM
I would also be surprised if the pilots come too. Wouldn't make sense to be doing all this hiring if they were.

Itís much cheaper to hire and train than integrate another group.

bronc
11-27-2018, 02:30 PM
DAL has changed their regional plan twice already during the lifespan of this thread

NotMe
11-27-2018, 02:31 PM
DAL has changed their regional plan twice already during the lifespan of this thread



^^^This!^^^

bronc
11-27-2018, 02:33 PM
If JF email is correct about our staffing target we could take all the delta owned GoJets planes as fast as they can be put on the certificate and not need another pilot.

This vacancy, which his most recent memo is attached to, does not come close to adhering with the staffing projections so dont believe a word of it

KSCessnaDriver
11-27-2018, 03:00 PM
Itís much cheaper to hire and train than integrate another group.

Not to mention the morale killer another merger of lists would be here.

PassportPlump
11-27-2018, 04:06 PM
It is also no secret that Delta wants control of their own brand which is mostly controllable with Endeavor. RJs are a necessary evil for now. Ed recently stated that he is ďhappy with the amount of RJ flying Delta has.Ē

Source: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-delta-air-ceo/delta-air-lines-happy-with-pilot-contract-rules-for-regional-flights-ceo-idUSKCN1N02WB

The A220/717 combo is going to be a big deal once itís all said and done with respect to large RJ flying replacements. Delta pilots will not be giving an inch of SCOPE in upcoming negotiations.

KSCessnaDriver
11-27-2018, 04:18 PM
At the same time, given that DGS is being sold and Monroe Energy is being shopped, maybe 9E is being shopped too?

gojo
11-27-2018, 04:50 PM
At the same time, given that DGS is being sold and Monroe Energy is being shopped, maybe 9E is being shopped too?

Iíve been overly optimistic in the past. Almost to the point of where I could be called a koolaid drinker. Iíve bought their sales pitch hook line and sinker. But 5 years of empty promises leads me to believe that maybe Iím being had. I hope Iím wrong, but now is the time for Delta to follow through on something.

ninerdriver
11-27-2018, 05:10 PM
At the same time, given that DGS is being sold and Monroe Energy is being shopped, maybe 9E is being shopped too?

I bet it'll be fun working with DGS crews who have just learned that their travel benefits have an expiration date. It's hard enough to hire ground crews in some outstations. What's going to keep folks from bailing to other ramp operations that do offer flight benefits? It's not like the pay or the hours are keeping them there.

SlamClicker
11-27-2018, 06:22 PM
At the same time, given that DGS is being sold and Monroe Energy is being shopped, maybe 9E is being shopped too?

Nah probably not right now, if they start cutting budgets, bring on a RIF, scale back on expenditures, and start screaming about cutting back on fuel use - then we are being prepped for a sale and should be concerned.

Bartok
11-28-2018, 03:23 AM
At the same time, given that DGS is being sold and Monroe Energy is being shopped, maybe 9E is being shopped too?

They do this with the ground crews every few years.

They all get rehired at a ďnewĒ company at 1rst year pay and benefits.

Still owned by Delta in the end.

Unfortunately they treat Regional airlines in a similar fashion.

Flogger
11-28-2018, 04:57 AM
I been bought by Delta.

I been sold by Delta.

I been fired by Delta.

Life goes on.

IAFDOF
11-28-2018, 05:08 AM
You move 16 tons, and what do you get? Another day older and deeper in debt...

theUpsideDown
11-28-2018, 05:17 AM
You move 16 tons, and what do you get? Another day older and deeper in debt...

I can snap my fingers but i can't remember all the words. Google to the rescue.

tomgoodman
11-28-2018, 05:31 AM
Linda put it best.....;)

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ScOpzm-BYX4

Mesabah
11-28-2018, 10:51 PM
The A220/717 combo is going to be a big deal once itís all said and done with respect to large RJ flying replacements.
Those GTF engines are optimized for long range cruise, not short RJ flights. Those long flights are already scoped out, and regionals can only do so many. The A220 will be a growth airplane, not an RJ replacement like the 717. Delta already has 100 less RJ's than AA/UA.

Baradium
11-29-2018, 03:40 PM
Those GTF engines are optimized for long range cruise, not short RJ flights. Those long flights are already scoped out, and regionals can only do so many. The A220 will be a growth airplane, not an RJ replacement like the 717. Delta already has 100 less RJ's than AA/UA.

A lot of the A220 flying may be new, but at least one route published is currently served by an RJ.

PassportPlump
11-29-2018, 04:21 PM
A lot of the A220 flying may be new, but at least one route published is currently served by an RJ.

More than one of them is currently served by an RJ. I understand that it is going to be a growth airplane, and as it grows and we close LAX 717 base, bringing those planes back east, guess what happens? More RJ flying comes back in house via the 717.

KSCessnaDriver
11-29-2018, 04:33 PM
More than one of them is currently served by an RJ. I understand that it is going to be a growth airplane, and as it grows and we close LAX 717 base, bringing those planes back east, guess what happens? More RJ flying comes back in house via the 717.

Of course, the 717 will be focused into ATL just like the 88 has been. But do you think Delta is going to park RJs (outside of some 50 seaters), no. Theyíll still fly somewhere, hopefully in regional routes

Mesabah
11-30-2018, 05:04 AM
A lot of the A220 flying may be new, but at least one route published is currently served by an RJ.
It won't be there for long probably, the A220 is best on routes like FNT-LAS or CLT-PDX, etc. Flights that would be served by an RJ, if they had that kind of range. Both the 717 and the RJs, are cheaper on the current routes they fly, than the A220.

Baradium
11-30-2018, 11:35 AM
It won't be there for long probably, the A220 is best on routes like FNT-LAS or CLT-PDX, etc. Flights that would be served by an RJ, if they had that kind of range. Both the 717 and the RJs, are cheaper on the current routes they fly, than the A220.

Citation definitely needed as I understand the A220 has the lowest cost per seat mile of any aircraft in the fleet throughout its range. If that's the case the only way an RJ would be cheaper would be if the route doesn't support the number of seats.

TalkTurkey
11-30-2018, 12:17 PM
Citation definitely needed as I understand the A220 has the lowest cost per seat mile of any aircraft in the fleet throughout its range. If that's the case the only way an RJ would be cheaper would be if the route doesn't support the number of seats.

No worries. The desert birds will be back after the economic downturn next year.

SlamClicker
11-30-2018, 12:30 PM
No worries. The desert birds will be back after the economic downturn next year.

Long live crazy 8s!

Avroman
11-30-2018, 08:19 PM
Long live crazy 8s!

Except in most cases a 900 is cheaper than a 200 because of the much better climb and minimal cruise burn difference plus you know that 50% seating increase. The 200 really only makes sense on short routes that can't fill more than 60 seats (yes I know seating capacities)

amcnd
12-01-2018, 04:58 AM
Except in most cases a 900 is cheaper than a 200 because of the much better climb and minimal cruise burn difference plus you know that 50% seating increase. The 200 really only makes sense on short routes that can't fill more than 60 seats (yes I know seating capacities)

200ís are mostly paid for at most airlines now... so they are super cheap. That 900 payment negates any savings over a 200 right now...

Baradium
12-01-2018, 03:05 PM
200ís are mostly paid for at most airlines now... so they are super cheap. That 900 payment negates any savings over a 200 right now...

It's a happy talking point, but I think the parking of 200s implies otherwise.

Green Needles
12-01-2018, 03:09 PM
It's a happy talking point, but I think the parking of 200s implies otherwise.

How many have we parked?

msprj2
12-01-2018, 03:11 PM
It's a happy talking point, but I think the parking of 200s implies otherwise.

Its about dual class cabin, not fuel burn.

Baradium
12-01-2018, 03:18 PM
How many have we parked?

How many does 9E still have? I'm more talking industry wide but 9E doesn't have as many as they used to either.

Baradium
12-01-2018, 03:20 PM
Its about dual class cabin, not fuel burn.

I do agree that the dual class cabin is a big component, but I don't think it's really all of it either. Their cost per seat mile is up there, the big advantage is on routes that don't support anything larger. The effective CASM for a 76 jet is a bit higher on routes that only support 40-50 passengers on a flight than if it was full.

Mesabah
12-02-2018, 12:17 PM
Citation definitely needed as I understand the A220 has the lowest cost per seat mile of any aircraft in the fleet throughout its range. If that's the case the only way an RJ would be cheaper would be if the route doesn't support the number of seats.
CASM is the average for the aircraft over a period of time. It doesn't represent the trip cost per route, for a specific aircraft. The A220 100 is a heavy airplane for a 100 seater. Over short routes, there isn't enough time in cruise to make up the energy expense for the climb. The GTF is optimized for long range cruise, it sips gas - only a couple hundred pounds more per hour, than a 76 RJ at altitude. It may have an edge on fuel for 500+ nm on the 717, but the 717 is paid for. RJ's are the cheapest on the less than 500nm routes. All this can be true, and the A220 still has the lowest CASM of the bunch, because neither plane could come close to the 1000+nm, it's something crazy, like up to 40% lower cost.

notmpet
12-02-2018, 12:27 PM
Go outside omfg lol

Mesabah
12-02-2018, 12:31 PM
How many does 9E still have? I'm more talking industry wide but 9E doesn't have as many as they used to either.
The future of the 50 seater is tied to the 55 seat slot restrictions at LGA. Delta has a 50 year lease agreement there. As a result, I could see Delta scope going from 125 50 seaters, to 50, 55 seaters, which might be CRJ 700s, or a new plane from Bombardier. This of course is when the 200's run out of service life.

Excargodog
12-02-2018, 12:44 PM
It's a more complicated issue than that:

Adjusting Operating Cost for Segment Length (http://speednews.com/article/7233)

Baradium
12-02-2018, 02:47 PM
The future of the 50 seater is tied to the 55 seat slot restrictions at LGA. Delta has a 50 year lease agreement there. As a result, I could see Delta scope going from 125 50 seaters, to 50, 55 seaters, which might be CRJ 700s, or a new plane from Bombardier. This of course is when the 200's run out of service life.

If they want 55 seaters they can use some of the current 51-70 seat scope to do it. There is no reason for DALPA to agree to allow more larger RJs in exchange for parking ones that would be parked regardless. Especially not for an airplane that is ripe for a "if you expand scope more it doesn't allow any more actual airframes" talking points when they want to bump them up in the future.

KSCessnaDriver
12-02-2018, 04:07 PM
CASM is the average for the aircraft over a period of time. It doesn't represent the trip cost per route, for a specific aircraft. The A220 100 is a heavy airplane for a 100 seater. Over short routes, there isn't enough time in cruise to make up the energy expense for the climb. The GTF is optimized for long range cruise, it sips gas - only a couple hundred pounds more per hour, than a 76 RJ at altitude. It may have an edge on fuel for 500+ nm on the 717, but the 717 is paid for. RJ's are the cheapest on the less than 500nm routes. All this can be true, and the A220 still has the lowest CASM of the bunch, because neither plane could come close to the 1000+nm, it's something crazy, like up to 40% lower cost.

717s arenít paid for, theyíre leased... Delta more or less assumed the leases from WN, IIRC

KSCessnaDriver
12-02-2018, 04:08 PM
The future of the 50 seater is tied to the 55 seat slot restrictions at LGA. Delta has a 50 year lease agreement there. As a result, I could see Delta scope going from 125 50 seaters, to 50, 55 seaters, which might be CRJ 700s, or a new plane from Bombardier. This of course is when the 200's run out of service life.

When the 200s we have now run out of usefuel life, we have at least that many more sitting in IGM that have life left in them...

Now I could see some 50 seat CR7s in the future with a heavy premium product

Mesabah
12-02-2018, 04:15 PM
717s arenít paid for, theyíre leased... Delta more or less assumed the leases from WN, IIRC
The lease is basically negligible.

42jeff
12-02-2018, 06:08 PM
Go outside omfg lol

I dont know what you meant by this but I laughed my ass off and spilled hot tea on my dog. In my mind you were telling the number crunchers to go outside and get some fresh air

Blueskies21
12-02-2018, 06:22 PM
The lease is basically negligible.

I must be missing something. How do you know what the costs of those leases are?

Also, mostly unrelated, how did a bunch of pilots get so good at calculating CASM? I know almost enough to be dangerous and it seems to me there's a lot of complex variables involved to get more than a wag.

Mesabah
12-02-2018, 06:35 PM
I must be missing something. How do you know what the costs of those leases are?

Also, mostly unrelated, how did a bunch of pilots get so good at calculating CASM? I know almost enough to be dangerous and it seems to me there's a lot of complex variables involved to get more than a wag.
Every single topic here has already been discussed 50,000 times on APC. SW bore the brunt of the cost to get rid of the extra fleet type.

Blueskies21
12-02-2018, 07:35 PM
Every single topic here has already been discussed 50,000 times on APC. SW bore the brunt of the cost to get rid of the extra fleet type.

Well that didn't answer the question.

Looking at Delta's 2017 Annual Filing with the SEC it looks like they've got $1 Billion in capital leases including Flight (Aircraft), and Ground Equipment. Included in that is about $100 Million per year for 2018 and 2019 and going down from there to about $24 million in 2022. They have 45 aircraft on capital lease including 15 717's.

There are an additional 151 aircraft on operating leases including 73 717's (I'm guessing these are the AirTran 717's). Operating lease costs for 2018 are $1.4 billion. How much of that is the 717's? What's a typical lease rate for that type of aircraft and therefore is a "good bargain" or "cheap"?

If you know the answers to these questions, you're wasting your talents in the cockpit, you should be making a lot more in management.

My point being, there's a lot of stuff that gets said here and among pilots that may have absolutely no basis in fact. I've heard the 717's were leased for cheap too, is that true? No idea.

With regard to CASM, I doubt if we're really capable of calculating a useful CASM for most of the aircraft we're discussing, so saying this aircraft is cheaper than that aircraft on this route is pure guessing. There's more that goes into it than someone with an extremely basic understanding of CASM (myself included) is going to be able to calculate.

Mesabah
12-02-2018, 08:13 PM
Well that didn't answer the question.

Looking at Delta's 2017 Annual Filing with the SEC it looks like they've got $1 Billion in capital leases including Flight (Aircraft), and Ground Equipment. Included in that is about $100 Million per year for 2018 and 2019 and going down from there to about $24 million in 2022. They have 45 aircraft on capital lease including 15 717's.

There are an additional 151 aircraft on operating leases including 73 717's (I'm guessing these are the AirTran 717's). Operating lease costs for 2018 are $1.4 billion. How much of that is the 717's? What's a typical lease rate for that type of aircraft and therefore is a "good bargain" or "cheap"?

If you know the answers to these questions, you're wasting your talents in the cockpit, you should be making a lot more in management.

My point being, there's a lot of stuff that gets said here and among pilots that may have absolutely no basis in fact. I've heard the 717's were leased for cheap too, is that true? No idea.

With regard to CASM, I doubt if we're really capable of calculating a useful CASM for most of the aircraft we're discussing, so saying this aircraft is cheaper than that aircraft on this route is pure guessing. There's more that goes into it than someone with an extremely basic understanding of CASM (myself included) is going to be able to calculate.
Sigh, you won't find what you're looking for in the Delta filing. However, SWA spun off a separate company called the AirTran leasing company of Delaware. They are due $242 million in sublease payments for the remainder of the term for Delta. That's 76 aircraft leased at $242 million for more than 10 years. They have all different rates, but the average is probably around $25,000 - $30,000 a month, per aircraft. It's probably less however.

notmpet
12-03-2018, 02:37 AM
I dont know what you meant by this but I laughed my ass off and spilled hot tea on my dog. In my mind you were telling the number crunchers to go outside and get some fresh air

Exactly filler

Blueskies21
12-03-2018, 08:32 AM
Sigh, you won't find what you're looking for in the Delta filing. However, SWA spun off a separate company called the AirTran leasing company of Delaware. They are due $242 million in sublease payments for the remainder of the term for Delta. That's 76 aircraft leased at $242 million for more than 10 years. They have all different rates, but the average is probably around $25,000 - $30,000 a month, per aircraft. It's probably less however.

It looks to me like Southwest has subleases of $336 million over the next 5 years. Did you find a separate filing for the subsidiary that breaks that down further?

Regardless, let's say your numbers are accurate, is $25-30,000 a month a good deal for dry leasing that type aircraft? How would you determine that? (Honestly asking to learn)

theUpsideDown
12-03-2018, 09:39 AM
It looks to me like Southwest has subleases of $336 million over the next 5 years. Did you find a separate filing for the subsidiary that breaks that down further?

Regardless, let's say your numbers are accurate, is $25-30,000 a month a good deal for dry leasing that type aircraft? How would you determine that? (Honestly asking to learn)

There is probably always a better deal out there but from what I've seen in the past it's a great deal. How will it compare to future leases? No idea.

SWA really didnt want to park them and deal with the return, and some money is better than no money.

Mesabah
12-03-2018, 10:44 AM
It looks to me like Southwest has subleases of $336 million over the next 5 years. Did you find a separate filing for the subsidiary that breaks that down further?

Regardless, let's say your numbers are accurate, is $25-30,000 a month a good deal for dry leasing that type aircraft? How would you determine that? (Honestly asking to learn)Yes, it's a good deal, but the aircraft were close to $70,000 a month over the last several years. Leasing used vs buying new is a massive TLDR post. However, in the context of my post above, assuming the cost of the A220, vs CRJ900, vs 717, you can assume the lease cost of the 717 is negligible vs the cost of the A220/CRJ. According to the Boeing lawsuit, Delta is getting the A220 at the same cost of a CRJ900.



It appears Delta is selling the A220 as a better customer experience vs the competitor. However, customers don't usually select their airline based on the airplane. Current customers will likely enjoy the aircraft over the CRJ900, but the E175 is just as comfortable as the A220. I think it's a wash there.



The A220 was also purchased before the 2016 oil drilling revolution, which now will likely keep oil costs below $75 for the next several decades.

scubadiver
12-03-2018, 12:37 PM
This conversation has gotten way too detailed. Go have a meal or soda with the rest of the crew for crying out loud, get out of your rooms a little (of course that is speculating that there are more than one boom clickers in this conversation).

KSCessnaDriver
12-03-2018, 12:46 PM
This conversation has gotten way too detailed. Go have a meal or soda with the rest of the crew for crying out loud, get out of your rooms a little (of course that is speculating that there are more than one boom clickers in this conversation).

Sorry that there are some guys here who pay attention to the business side of aviation. God forbid people do something other than fly airplanes.

scubadiver
12-03-2018, 01:05 PM
Youíre excused. Thanks for apologizing.

SlamClicker
12-03-2018, 02:02 PM
This conversation has gotten way too detailed. Go have a meal or soda with the rest of the crew for crying out loud, get out of your rooms a little (of course that is speculating that there are more than one boom clickers in this conversation).

Why? So the new FO can give me career advice telling me how I should still go to Delta and the FA can confirm my suspicion that he/she/they are crazy?

Blueskies21
12-03-2018, 04:41 PM
Why? So the new FO can give me career advice telling me how I should still go to Delta and the FA can confirm my suspicion that he/she/they are crazy?

I LOL'd but yeah... I still go... but yeah.

PotatoChip
12-03-2018, 05:34 PM
Why? So the new FO can give me career advice telling me how I should still go to Delta and the FA can confirm my suspicion that he/she/they are crazy?

OMG. If I have to listen to one more 25 year old FO give me career advice.......

theUpsideDown
12-03-2018, 06:04 PM
OMG. If I have to listen to one more 25 year old FO give me career advice.......

With the upgrade picture changing so much and growth promised a long way away, start telling them theyre right, lets goto frontier together!

scubadiver
12-03-2018, 07:42 PM
Why? So the new FO can give me career advice telling me how I should still go to Delta and the FA can confirm my suspicion that he/she/they are crazy?

I am in no way trying to give anyone advice. Iím super noob. I have no specific major that I am striving towards, but out of curiosity why arenít you looking at Delta?

SlamClicker
12-03-2018, 08:22 PM
I am in no way trying to give anyone advice. Iím super noob. I have no specific major that I am striving towards, but out of curiosity why arenít you looking at Delta?

After serving Delta customers for 11 years this December and still being told by said company that I am not up to their ďstrict quality control standardsĒ on more than one occasion despite meeting or exceeding those ďstrictĒ standards on an daily basis - I have no interest in working for said company.

Baradium
12-03-2018, 08:46 PM
It appears Delta is selling the A220 as a better customer experience vs the competitor. However, customers don't usually select their airline based on the airplane. Current customers will likely enjoy the aircraft over the CRJ900, but the E175 is just as comfortable as the A220. I think it's a wash there.


I don't have anything to add for the rest of your post except to say that some customers do actually select either their airline or flight based on aircraft type. I do believe Delta marketing pays attention to that, especially when it comes to premium customers.

As far as how comfortable the A220 is, I've seen articles gushing about how nice it is, but nothing saying it's "not any more comfortable than ___"

preflight
12-04-2018, 05:49 AM
OMG. If I have to listen to one more 25 year old FO give me career advice.......

After 40+ years of driving on ice in the winter, I had to listen to my 16-year-old newly licensed child tell me how to do it this morning. Kids only know what they know and have no idea what you know. Trying to help does not entail any intention to do harm but it can be frustrating to those of us who have been in the game longer!

Flogger
12-04-2018, 06:52 AM
After 40+ years of driving on ice in the winter, I had to listen to my 16-year-old newly licensed child tell me how to do it this morning. Kids only know what they know and have no idea what you know. Trying to help does not entail any intention to do harm but it can be frustrating to those of us who have been in the game longer!

When we were 16 we NEVER did that!!! Nope nope nope nope nopppity nope!!! :rolleyes:

flyingmau5
12-04-2018, 10:58 AM
I don't have anything to add for the rest of your post except to say that some customers do actually select either their airline or flight based on aircraft type. I do believe Delta marketing pays attention to that, especially when it comes to premium customers.

As far as how comfortable the A220 is, I've seen articles gushing about how nice it is, but nothing saying it's "not any more comfortable than ___"

It's definitely a whole lot more comfortable than an RJ. :D

Avroman
12-07-2018, 05:10 PM
It's definitely a whole lot more comfortable than an RJ. :D

Even the Saab was more comfortable than a CRJ/ERJ.