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View Full Version : 1st year takehome pay


K92plane
12-15-2018, 06:28 PM
Hey guys- if I may ask, what’s the take home pay for first year first officers take home pay per paycheck ?


Captain Slow
12-15-2018, 07:21 PM
It will vary wildly based on where you live, your benefit elections, and your retirement deduction. Some guys in my class were lucky to take home 2k a month (40/hr at the time), some took home 2700. It really just depends.


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Longhornmaniac8
12-15-2018, 11:24 PM
Hey guys- if I may ask, what’s the take home pay for first year first officers take home pay per paycheck ?

Not trying to be negative here, as we're all still learning to one extent or another, but the answers to this question are so varied as to be virtually irrelevant.

As mentioned, what our net pay is depends on tax bracket, retirement contributions, other liquid savings, benefit elections, style/strategy for working, etc.

You can figure out a "worst-case scenario" of sorts, but even that has some assumptions.

As a "worst-case scenario" data point, I'm currently in the middle of the training delay, getting paid the minimum 75 hours. I'm filing taxes as single, head-of-household, with just one exemption (no state income tax), currently contributing 4% to my 401(k) (scheduled to increase by 1% annually), and am taking the pilot health plan at $54/paycheck with no additional contribution beyond the company's to my HSA (I have one rolled over from a previous employer).

My gross pay is $45/hour x 75 hours/month, which is $3375/month. Of that, including all my deductions, I'm seeing about $2700 into my checking account. It will remain to be seen how much (if any) I owe Uncle Sam come April.

To figure out on a per-paycheck basis, just divide by 2.

$2700/month x 12 months= $32.4K/year.

Add to that the $17,500 signing bonus, and first year "net" pay is right at $50K at the absolute worst case scenario.

On the line, minimum credit these days seems to be around 80-83 hours/month, which would bump that $32.4K up about $2K. Obviously, if you know how to work it, you can get substantially more credit than the bare minimum.


simscott
12-16-2018, 07:42 AM
Not trying to be negative here, as we're all still learning to one extent or another, but the answers to this question are so varied as to be virtually irrelevant.

As mentioned, what our net pay is depends on tax bracket, retirement contributions, other liquid savings, benefit elections, style/strategy for working, etc.

You can figure out a "worst-case scenario" of sorts, but even that has some assumptions.

As a "worst-case scenario" data point, I'm currently in the middle of the training delay, getting paid the minimum 75 hours. I'm filing taxes as single, head-of-household, with just one exemption (no state income tax), currently contributing 4% to my 401(k) (scheduled to increase by 1% annually), and am taking the pilot health plan at $54/paycheck with no additional contribution beyond the company's to my HSA (I have one rolled over from a previous employer).

My gross pay is $45/hour x 75 hours/month, which is $3375/month. Of that, including all my deductions, I'm seeing about $2700 into my checking account. It will remain to be seen how much (if any) I owe Uncle Sam come April.

To figure out on a per-paycheck basis, just divide by 2.

$2700/month x 12 months= $32.4K/year.

Add to that the $17,500 signing bonus, and first year "net" pay is right at $50K at the absolute worst case scenario.

On the line, minimum credit these days seems to be around 80-83 hours/month, which would bump that $32.4K up about $2K. Obviously, if you know how to work it, you can get substantially more credit than the bare minimum.

What about per diem?

K92plane
12-16-2018, 07:46 AM
Not trying to be negative here, as we're all still learning to one extent or another, but the answers to this question are so varied as to be virtually irrelevant.

As mentioned, what our net pay is depends on tax bracket, retirement contributions, other liquid savings, benefit elections, style/strategy for working, etc.

You can figure out a "worst-case scenario" of sorts, but even that has some assumptions.

As a "worst-case scenario" data point, I'm currently in the middle of the training delay, getting paid the minimum 75 hours. I'm filing taxes as single, head-of-household, with just one exemption (no state income tax), currently contributing 4% to my 401(k) (scheduled to increase by 1% annually), and am taking the pilot health plan at $54/paycheck with no additional contribution beyond the company's to my HSA (I have one rolled over from a previous employer).

My gross pay is $45/hour x 75 hours/month, which is $3375/month. Of that, including all my deductions, I'm seeing about $2700 into my checking account. It will remain to be seen how much (if any) I owe Uncle Sam come April.

To figure out on a per-paycheck basis, just divide by 2.

$2700/month x 12 months= $32.4K/year.

Add to that the $17,500 signing bonus, and first year "net" pay is right at $50K at the absolute worst case scenario.

On the line, minimum credit these days seems to be around 80-83 hours/month, which would bump that $32.4K up about $2K. Obviously, if you know how to work it, you can get substantially more credit than the bare minimum.


Thank you!!

Tigflt17
12-16-2018, 07:59 AM
Your bonus is not paid in full for year 1. It is split over 2 years. The first 10,000 is during year 1 and after a heavy tax hit, you’re only going to see maybe 6000-6500

TheWeatherman
12-16-2018, 08:20 AM
Varies based on base assignment, reserve time, and whatever your bonus will be. Nobody knows what those will be because they are constantly changing. Payscales to all the airlines are in the profile section of this page. Simple math will tell you what to anticipate your yearly take home will be.

JayD
12-16-2018, 11:03 AM
What about per diem?

These calculations wouldn’t include per diem since he’s sitting at home right now waiting for training. Once he starts flying per diem would be in addition to this.

direct2entent
12-16-2018, 06:10 PM
Not trying to be negative here, as we're all still learning to one extent or another, but the answers to this question are so varied as to be virtually irrelevant.

As mentioned, what our net pay is depends on tax bracket, retirement contributions, other liquid savings, benefit elections, style/strategy for working, etc.

You can figure out a "worst-case scenario" of sorts, but even that has some assumptions.

As a "worst-case scenario" data point, I'm currently in the middle of the training delay, getting paid the minimum 75 hours. I'm filing taxes as single, head-of-household, with just one exemption (no state income tax), currently contributing 4% to my 401(k) (scheduled to increase by 1% annually), and am taking the pilot health plan at $54/paycheck with no additional contribution beyond the company's to my HSA (I have one rolled over from a previous employer).

My gross pay is $45/hour x 75 hours/month, which is $3375/month. Of that, including all my deductions, I'm seeing about $2700 into my checking account. It will remain to be seen how much (if any) I owe Uncle Sam come April.

To figure out on a per-paycheck basis, just divide by 2.

$2700/month x 12 months= $32.4K/year.

Add to that the $17,500 signing bonus, and first year "net" pay is right at $50K at the absolute worst case scenario.

On the line, minimum credit these days seems to be around 80-83 hours/month, which would bump that $32.4K up about $2K. Obviously, if you know how to work it, you can get substantially more credit than the bare minimum.

Also on training delay. This is pretty close to what I net too. Amazing how low it ends up being. Hopefully moving to Indy from Seattle after IOE for a lower cost of living.

jslehman1
12-16-2018, 06:23 PM
Has anyone been there a year that has grossed the advertised average base pay of $45,000? How long were you on reserves? Average line credit? Just curious if that’s realistic.

TheWeatherman
12-16-2018, 06:39 PM
Has anyone been there a year that has grossed the advertised average base pay of $45,000? How long were you on reserves? Average line credit? Just curious if that’s realistic.
Flew the whole year as my IOE ended mid Jan. Easily made more then that and that and that is not even including the $7500 part of my bonus I got after IOE. 3 months of reserve.



With that said, this really means nothing at this point as you and other new hires will be entering a dramatically different landscape then the one I entered. The flood of new hires means longer reserve times and less open time trips/trade board pickups for extra time. So I would say for new hires around 45K might be right on.

DarkSideMoon
12-16-2018, 06:42 PM
Your bonus is not paid in full for year 1. It is split over 2 years. The first 10,000 is during year 1 and after a heavy tax hit, you’re only going to see maybe 6000-6500

Bonuses aren’t taxed any differently than any other earned income. They may be withheld differently based on your employer’s preferences.

GHawk
12-17-2018, 03:51 AM
Bonuses aren’t taxed any differently than any other earned income. They may be withheld differently based on your employer’s preferences.Preach. A very common misconception regarding bonuses.