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View Full Version : FAA study material.


RF4E
12-26-2018, 06:40 AM
Hello everyone,


I'm from Europe and I'm interested in pursuing my flight training in the US. I have a question regarding the FAA study material.

In Europe,for the ATPL theory,we buy 13-14 books (cats/oxford etc) which are thousand of pages, and subscribe to an online question bank. In the USA,I know that theory is much more practical and sensible,but I can't find the material you study for PPL,IR/CPL etc.

What's the material you guys study for the written exams?

Thank you.


chronomaster31
12-26-2018, 07:02 AM
Hello everyone,


I'm from Europe and I'm interested in pursuing my flight training in the US. I have a question regarding the FAA study material.

In Europe,for the ATPL theory,we buy 13-14 books (cats/oxford etc) which are thousand of pages, and subscribe to an online question bank. In the USA,I know that theory is much more practical and sensible,but I can't find the material you study for PPL,IR/CPL etc.

What's the material you guys study for the written exams?

Thank you.For written exams, we use Sheppard air. Great resource to help you pass, but not very good for actually learning anything. For private pilot (since Sheppard air doesn't have a product for private) I used king online videos which was sufficient. Reading books isn't really necessary until you get to checkride prep

Sent from my LG-H931 using Tapatalk

IDIOTPILOT
12-26-2018, 07:07 AM
In the past, the question banks were limited and one could literally memorize the answers to the hundreds of questions possible. That has been changing for several tests, most notable the CFI part. Most pay third party companies that have compiled the questions and answers into different formats. Most of the tests you can still do this but the harder tests have been getting a lot of questions added.

As far as actual source material, the following is an example from Private Pilot. All of this can be found in electronic form online for free.


The knowledge tests for Private and Recreational Pilot exams are based on the following references.
Note:
14 CFR part 1 Definitions and Abbreviations
14 CFR part 39 Airworthiness Directives
14 CFR part 43 Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, Rebuilding, and Alteration
14 CFR part 61 Certification: Pilots, Flight Instructors, and Ground Instructors
14 CFR part 71 Designation of Class A, B, C, D, and E Airspace Areas; Air Traffic Service Routes
14 CFR part 91 General Operating and Flight Rules
49 CFR part 830 Notification and Reporting of Aircraft Accidents
AC 00-45 - Aviation Weather Services
AC 00-6 - Aviation Weather
AC 20-43 - Aircraft Fuel Control
AC 60-22 - Aeronautical Decision Making
AC 90-48 - Pilots` Role in Collision Avoidance
AC 91-13 - Cold Weather Operation of Aircraft
Aeronautical Information Manual
Chart Supplements U.S. (formerly Airport/Facility Directory)
FAA-H-8083-1 - Aircraft Weight and Balance Handbook
FAA-H-8083-11 - Balloon Flying Handbook
FAA-H-8083-13 - Glider Flying Handbook
FAA-H-8083-2 - Risk Management Handbook
FAA-H-8083-21 - Helicopter Flying Handbook
FAA-H-8083-21 - Rotorcraft Flying Handbook
FAA-H-8083-25 - Pilot`s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge
FAA-H-8083-29 - Powered Parachute Flying Handbook
FAA-H-8083-3A - Airplane Flying Handbook
FAA-H-8083-5 - Weight-Shift Control Aircraft Flying Handbook
FAA-H-8261-1 - Instrument Procedures Handbook
FAA-P-8740-39 - Balloon Safety Tips
Navy Lighter-Than-Air Airship Flight Manual
Sectional Aeronautical Chart
www.faa.gov - Search for ACs
The latest revision of these references should be used.


TiredSoul
12-26-2018, 07:08 AM
All the FAA recommended study materials are available FREE to download from the FAA website.
https://www.faa.gov/pilots/training/
You can also but then in printed book form and around $15-$19/each.
The downloads are certainly good enough to start studying.
Did I mention theyíre FREE :D

RF4E
12-26-2018, 07:09 AM
For written exams, we use Sheppard air. Great resource to help you pass, but not very good for actually learning anything. For private pilot (since Sheppard air doesn't have a product for private) I used king online videos which was sufficient. Reading books isn't really necessary until you get to checkride prep

Sent from my LG-H931 using Tapatalk

I see. So Sheppard air will help me pass,what material would you recommend me to combine with Sheppard air for actual learning as well?

Edit: Now i saw your replies guys. So i will combine the free FAA study material mentioned above with Sheppard air,thank you all very much!

JamesNoBrakes
12-26-2018, 01:24 PM
I see. So Sheppard air will help me pass,what material would you recommend me to combine with Sheppard air for actual learning as well?

Edit: Now i saw your replies guys. So i will combine the free FAA study material mentioned above with Sheppard air,thank you all very much!

It's been recommended a few times already in this thread.

JohnBurke
12-26-2018, 10:18 PM
Sheppard air won't teach you squat: it exists for one reason only: get you through the written test. It's about as close to cheating as you can get without actually cheating.

That said, you might as well use it, though I'd never recommend that approach. Someone above listed a lot of resources; if you read all those you'll spend the next few years trying to get through it.

FAA regulations are available online, current, and at no cost: Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations. You'll want to look over the definitions in Part 1, Part 61 for pilot certification, Part 91 for operations.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=c915832a84ba692682f2bff94e8a387c&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title14/14tab_02.tpl

Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 830, covers aircraft accidents and incidents and notification. You'll be required to know that.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=4822d54b7fae72ee22d6e493fc0fa2d7&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title49/49cfr830_main_02.tpl

The Aeronautical Information Manual covers a great deal of what you'll need to know. Also at no cost, https://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/media/AIM_Basic_dtd_10-12-17.pdf

The PHAK or Pilot Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge covers all the basics: https://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/handbooks_manuals/aviation/phak/

The Airplane Flying Handbook will cover most of the rest: https://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/handbooks_manuals/aviation/airplane_handbook/

The Pilot-Controller Glossary is also useful: https://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/media/pcg_10-12-17.pdf

Sheppard air isn't about learning. Just about passing a test.

Note that some of the references listed by idiotpilot, above, are outdated and a later versions is available (eg: Airplane Flying Handbook, FAA-8083-3A, is now FAA-8083-3B, etc).

TiredSoul
12-26-2018, 11:57 PM
Thatís why I linked to the FAA website, always the most current up to date 100 year old material :D

JohnBurke
12-27-2018, 01:24 AM
Yeah...just a few years ago the FAA finally updated their AC43.13 mechanic's bible to reflect changes in wood glues for aircraft structures.

RF4E
12-27-2018, 02:08 AM
Sheppard air won't teach you squat: it exists for one reason only: get you through the written test. It's about as close to cheating as you can get without actually cheating.

That said, you might as well use it, though I'd never recommend that approach. Someone above listed a lot of resources; if you read all those you'll spend the next few years trying to get through it.

FAA regulations are available online, current, and at no cost: Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations. You'll want to look over the definitions in Part 1, Part 61 for pilot certification, Part 91 for operations.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=c915832a84ba692682f2bff94e8a387c&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title14/14tab_02.tpl

Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 830, covers aircraft accidents and incidents and notification. You'll be required to know that.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=4822d54b7fae72ee22d6e493fc0fa2d7&mc=true&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title49/49cfr830_main_02.tpl

The Aeronautical Information Manual covers a great deal of what you'll need to know. Also at no cost, https://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/media/AIM_Basic_dtd_10-12-17.pdf

The PHAK or Pilot Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge covers all the basics: https://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/handbooks_manuals/aviation/phak/

The Airplane Flying Handbook will cover most of the rest: https://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/handbooks_manuals/aviation/airplane_handbook/

The Pilot-Controller Glossary is also useful: https://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/media/pcg_10-12-17.pdf

Sheppard air isn't about learning. Just about passing a test.

Note that some of the references listed by idiotpilot, above, are outdated and a later versions is available (eg: Airplane Flying Handbook, FAA-8083-3A, is now FAA-8083-3B, etc).

I know that Sheppard air will be used to pass the tests and I don't just want to pass the test,I want to learn,that's why I asked here. I don't want to spend years trying to get through it though,so thanks for clarifying.

I want to confirm: So all PPL/CPL/IR etc theory is covered in the above documents? Is it okay to start with PHAK first?

Thank you!

JohnBurke
12-27-2018, 02:21 AM
There are other documents to view as well, such as the Airman Certification Standards, which spell out the specifics for each level of pilot certification. https://www.faa.gov/training_testing/testing/test_standards/

For the instrument rating, you'll also need the Instrument Flying Handbook.

https://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/handbooks_manuals/aviation/media/faa-h-8083-15b.pdf

sourdough44
12-27-2018, 03:05 AM
Research a school and come on over. The training hotbeds are FL and AZ, other lesser knowns.

TiredSoul
12-28-2018, 01:37 AM
Research a school and come on over. The training hotbeds are FL and AZ, other lesser knowns.

Thatís incomplete.
Traditionally, as in since WW2, the flight training states are all the southern states from California, New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia and Florida.
If you look up the statistics on the FAA website youíll find California and Florida are alternating #1 and #2 in certificates issued.

Excargodog
12-28-2018, 01:37 PM
Yeah...just a few years ago the FAA finally updated their AC43.13 mechanic's bible to reflect changes in wood glues for aircraft structures.

Yeah, the PETA people were hammering them for still listing the glue made out of the serum from horse blood that they used in WWI fighter aircraft.

RF4E
12-28-2018, 03:58 PM
Okay guys,thank you all. Since you brought this up I will probably open another topic regarding training,because I have a lot of questions.

JohnBurke
12-28-2018, 05:37 PM
Yeah, the PETA people were hammering them for still listing the glue made out of the serum from horse blood that they used in WWI fighter aircraft.

Aerolite (caesin) had a long term history and was until recently still being sold and used in experimental operations; I've attended some wood aircraft seminars in recent years, and a few still continued to preach it, but it's fallen out of favor as it does tend to deteriorate and can decompose organically. Present guidance states that it should be considered obsolete. Same for plastic resins. Also until fairly recently a popular choice.

tm602
12-30-2018, 08:48 AM
FAA material is much easier than the EASA stuff. You'll do fine.



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