Airline Pilot Forums

Airline Pilot Forums was designed to be a community where working airline pilots can share ideas and information about the aviation field. In the forum you will find information about major and regional airline carriers, career training, interview and job seeker help, finance, and living the airline pilot lifestyle.




tangowhsky
12-27-2018, 12:17 PM
After my current assignment ends i'll be at 17 years and able to leave and a passed over major. I had the inclination to stay until 20...but is it still worth it now.

Unfortunately, thinking 20 years and 0-5 was going to happen, I never really began educating myself on all the other possibilities. e.g., joinging the guard/reserves. I just figured i'd do my 20 followed by the second career with the airlines.

Momma is worried of my now thinking getting out soonest to get that line number is preferential, but I haven't done the proper research to know for sure yet...or even where to begin. I'm unsure on the whole process and don't even know things like; if I get out at 17 years, then get on full time with guard/reserves to get to my "20", do I still have to wait until age 60 for the check of the month?

I don't dislike what i'm doing or would be doing those last few years...i'm flying...is good! But could use some words of wisdom, lessons learned, pros and cons, etc. of considerations. Thanks all!


Excargodog
12-27-2018, 01:02 PM
After my current assignment ends i'll be at 17 years and able to leave and a passed over major. I had the inclination to stay until 20...but is it still worth it now.

Unfortunately, thinking 20 years and 0-5 was going to happen, I never really began educating myself on all the other possibilities. e.g., joinging the guard/reserves. I just figured i'd do my 20 followed by the second career with the airlines.

Momma is worried of my now thinking getting out soonest to get that line number is preferential, but I haven't done the proper research to know for sure yet...or even where to begin. I'm unsure on the whole process and don't even know things like; if I get out at 17 years, then get on full time with guard/reserves to get to my "20", do I still have to wait until age 60 for the check of the month?

I don't dislike what i'm doing or would be doing those last few years...i'm flying...is good! But could use some words of wisdom, lessons learned, pros and cons, etc. of considerations. Thanks all!


Guard and Reserve retirements generally require monetary benefits to start at age 60:

https://ec.militarytimes.com/guard-reserve-handbook/retirement/basic-plans/

You might want to look in to the career intermission program:

https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/117576-career-intermission-program.html

https://www.esd.whs.mil/Portals/54/Documents/DD/issuances/dodi/132707p.PDF?ver=2018-10-18-114030-977

goinaround
12-27-2018, 04:05 PM
Accumulate 3 more years of qualifying active duty with the guard/reserve and draw an active duty retirement just like you would otherwise. Whatever you choose to do.....do NOT throw away 17 years!


Uh60mgamecock
12-27-2018, 04:45 PM
Iím having a hard time pondering the 13 year mark and leaving. 17 years would be a no brained to stay. Have you contemplated being a 2 time SELCON?

tangowhsky
12-27-2018, 05:17 PM
https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/military/117576-career-intermission-program.html[/url]

https://www.esd.whs.mil/Portals/54/Documents/DD/issuances/dodi/132707p.PDF?ver=2018-10-18-114030-977

I remember this coming out from the afpc bot, and thinking that's neat and all...but I won't need to bother with that. Thanks for pointing me over to it to throw into the "exit strategy book of knowledge."

I was sure the several guys I knew from previous assignment, who were passed over, traded patches one day, were put on full time orders and are about to finish what I assumed would be the remainder of their time for the active duty retirement. I just never asked if that's what was actually being done or possible.

Wheelsoff
12-28-2018, 05:37 AM
Iíd be very careful about trying the career intermission program. Some others on here have said they intend to try it, but I donít trust the AF as far as I can throw a rock, so itís a ďhard noĒ for me. Make sure you fully understand the program/rules/regs thoroughly beforehand.

I do think itís a valuable program for some, but I donít believe the intent of it was for people to take a break to gain employment somewhere, then try to hide behind USERRA when they are forced to return to active duty for X years. Could be wrong, but I donít think that will go over too well with your respective airline employer. I know for myself personally, I wouldnít risk it as it seems foolish.

As others have said, the ďsafestĒ (and easiest) option is probably to find a guard/reserve unit, get on full time orders or an AGR slot to make it to 20.

SaltyDog
12-28-2018, 06:49 AM
After my current assignment ends i'll be at 17 years and able to leave and a passed over major. I had the inclination to stay until 20...but is it still worth it now.


Finish to 20, certainly simplified without Guard/Reserve in the mix and can focus only on where you want to live and civilian flying job that may enhance the package called quality of life.
Kids? ages? family issues? (Aging parents, family wants to move to XYZ? or are they open to ABC?, DEF?

How much longer on current assignment? Then what possible/most likely follow on orders? Flying orders best. What might be your currency when hit 20?
What are you flying now?

Can you get to your final airline job right out of this tour (Where are peers getting hired?)
Then you need to look at ANG/Reserve unit arrangements to fit airline mix. Airline domicile locations with unit locations. Which airline/Guard/Reserve combination determines where you live and commuting pain priorities.

Airline and Reserve combination is a significant life commitment and family pays for your dual status as service member and airline employee. Extraordinary to have family survive a dual commute. I lived in airline domicile through 2 airlines and chose to commute to the military reserve duty. In my circumstance that provided more opportunity to be with family. Others determine to live in Guard/Reserve location as that works better.

Economics: Have you saved up for the move after this tour ends? Go to a regional, then grab Guard/reserve duty location, then move to final airline job?

Its easy to throw dart and stay 20 and then focus on fewer variables, but throwing in the considerations above is very individual to you and your family. The answers will certainly help you determine best choices and best fit going forward.
Definitely look at the details of how your life will look if leave before 20/after 20. This is only a very rough cut of considerations.
Best in your adventure and journey!

Wheelsoff
12-28-2018, 07:59 AM
Iíll caveat my previous post with what saltydog said above - the ďeasiestĒ option would be to ride it out to 20 on AD, followed by the guard/reserve option. Fewer life variables that way, as mentioned.

For me, I plan on getting out at my commitment (wonít have 17 years by then anyways) so my life situation is different.

tangowhsky
12-28-2018, 11:13 AM
Finish to 20, certainly simplified without Guard/Reserve in the mix and can focus only on where you want to live and civilian flying job that may enhance the package called quality of life.
Kids? ages? family issues? (Aging parents, family wants to move to XYZ? or are they open to ABC?, DEF?

How much longer on current assignment? Then what possible/most likely follow on orders? Flying orders best. What might be your currency when hit 20?
What are you flying now?

Can you get to your final airline job right out of this tour (Where are peers getting hired?)
Then you need to look at ANG/Reserve unit arrangements to fit airline mix. Airline domicile locations with unit locations. Which airline/Guard/Reserve combination determines where you live and commuting pain priorities.

Airline and Reserve combination is a significant life commitment and family pays for your dual status as service member and airline employee. Extraordinary to have family survive a dual commute. I lived in airline domicile through 2 airlines and chose to commute to the military reserve duty. In my circumstance that provided more opportunity to be with family. Others determine to live in Guard/Reserve location as that works better.

Economics: Have you saved up for the move after this tour ends? Go to a regional, then grab Guard/reserve duty location, then move to final airline job?

Its easy to throw dart and stay 20 and then focus on fewer variables, but throwing in the considerations above is very individual to you and your family. The answers will certainly help you determine best choices and best fit going forward.
Definitely look at the details of how your life will look if leave before 20/after 20. This is only a very rough cut of considerations.
Best in your adventure and journey!

I appreciate the info you caged my mind to ponder/discuss SaltyDog. That certainly makes it sound like staying in is undoubtedly simpler. Several folks I previously worked with sure made it look easy at face value, but since I never sat down with them to ask these kind of questions, I really have no idea how it was really going.

After reading up on posts about that CIP program, it does seem like that might be something i'd rather not chance...plus i don't want to owe any more years than I have to.

I'm a C-17 bubba with a little over 2 years left on current assignment. As long as the health holds up, currency should not be an issue once done. And actually for QoL on the last assignment, back to UPT or PIT are leading that race.

Fellas, thanks for some good points to ponder.

Wheelsoff
12-28-2018, 02:19 PM
I appreciate the info you caged my mind to ponder/discuss SaltyDog. That certainly makes it sound like staying in is undoubtedly simpler. Several folks I previously worked with sure made it look easy at face value, but since I never sat down with them to ask these kind of questions, I really have no idea how it was really going.

After reading up on posts about that CIP program, it does seem like that might be something i'd rather not chance...plus i don't want to owe any more years than I have to.

I'm a C-17 bubba with a little over 2 years left on current assignment. As long as the health holds up, currency should not be an issue once done. And actually for QoL on the last assignment, back to UPT or PIT are leading that race.

Fellas, thanks for some good points to ponder.

Iím a former C-17 guy currently at UPT. If you have questions about it, let me know.

BLUF: itís way better in AETC. I wonít be going back to AMC unless something terrible happens that forces me to.

Good luck!

Sputnik
12-28-2018, 05:05 PM
Tough call man. I was in a similar boat about 10 years ago, but it was pre the hiring boom and I had no idea what I wanted to do when (if?) I grew up. Staying to 20 was a no brainer for me. But different times.

I recommend you talk to closest reserve unit and checking your options. I seem to recall complications in getting picked up as a passed over dude. Again, different times now.

If reserves are an option, you got a spreadsheet to build and some tough conversations to have with the wife.

FWIW, I stayed in and my last assignment was by far my best. I didn't want to retire as an O4. But being a terminal O4 added some fun to those last few years.

Hard to give up that active duty pension. And the health care is pretty nice.

Good luck

navigatro
12-28-2018, 05:38 PM
The best part of retirement is you never have to read the word "BLUF" in an e-mail again.

Unless you read it on this website.

In any case, definitely get your 20 then go to the airlines.

tangowhsky
12-28-2018, 06:18 PM
Iím a former C-17 guy currently at UPT. If you have questions about it, let me know.



BLUF: itís way better in AETC. I wonít be going back to AMC unless something terrible happens that forces me to.



Good luck!



I taught UPT before this assignment. Was pretty burnt out after 2.5 years. But I tell the young'uns how it really can be a blessing in disguise if you can leverage the groundhog effect. Most days I'm wondering why I didn't find a way to make it better and stay two assignments (i.e., swap airframes).

Wheelsoff
12-29-2018, 06:07 AM
I taught UPT before this assignment. Was pretty burnt out after 2.5 years. But I tell the young'uns how it really can be a blessing in disguise if you can leverage the groundhog effect. Most days I'm wondering why I didn't find a way to make it better and stay two assignments (i.e., swap airframes).

Gotcha. Been doing this for 2 years now and there are groundhog days, no doubt, but Iím still loving it! T-6s are probably a different story...those guys/gals work harder than anyone.

Otterbox
12-29-2018, 07:06 AM
After my current assignment ends i'll be at 17 years and able to leave and a passed over major. I had the inclination to stay until 20...but is it still worth it now.

Unfortunately, thinking 20 years and 0-5 was going to happen, I never really began educating myself on all the other possibilities. e.g., joinging the guard/reserves. I just figured i'd do my 20 followed by the second career with the airlines.

Momma is worried of my now thinking getting out soonest to get that line number is preferential, but I haven't done the proper research to know for sure yet...or even where to begin. I'm unsure on the whole process and don't even know things like; if I get out at 17 years, then get on full time with guard/reserves to get to my "20", do I still have to wait until age 60 for the check of the month?

I don't dislike what i'm doing or would be doing those last few years...i'm flying...is good! But could use some words of wisdom, lessons learned, pros and cons, etc. of considerations. Thanks all!

Without the spousal support for the large pay cut for the first year, it’s going to be stressful without that pension supplement to your income, no matter where you end up, especially if you’re a commuter or a single income household.

Going to the airlines 3 years early at the 17 year mark will earn you approximately $750k-$1.05mil for the last three years of your airline career depending on if you retire as a Narrow Body Captain or Widebody Captain.

Waiting three years and collecting O-4 (ret) pay will earn you approximately $969k-1.11mil between retirement and age 65 (depending on if you’re retiring at 42 or 45yrs old).

Math checks out that you’re probably financially better off staying in and going for the pension at that point. Live longer than age 65 and you earn far more by staying for 20 over your life time.

rickair7777
12-29-2018, 07:11 AM
Historical CW would be stay for 20 (and I've told people that in no uncertain terms in years past). However...

At this exact moment in time (due to airline retirement demographics) that would probably cost you a great deal in terms of seniority and ultimate compensation.

Odds are decent that you could bail now, lock in airline seniority, and then participate in guard/reserves to either qualify for a regular AD retirement, or as a consolation prize the reserve retirement at age 60.

It comes down to risk tolerance and how hard you want to chase the best possible airline deal. Upside is having your cake and eating it too. Downside is risk of economic issues, or worst-case medical issues and possibly ending up unable to fly or participate in the reserves to finish the retirement.

di1630
12-29-2018, 09:13 AM
Dude, stay in and min run that ****. Fly, make a difference by helping the USAF be better but don't give 2 f-cks's about the qweep and BS unless it adds to the mission, saves a life or helps someone in genuine need.

I'd be a the gym each day, out of the office by 1630 or earlier, chaffing off BS, using leave whenever I please and voicing my real opinion without fear of repercussion.

Other than the few bucks you are missing on O-5 pay, you are on the home stretch man to a guaranteed pension and healthcare for life and no reason to play the game.

Stick it out.

tangowhsky
12-29-2018, 11:11 AM
... T-6s are probably a different story...those guys/gals work harder than anyone.

I'll vouch for this. The lack of variation and mostly rinse and repeat is what grinds one down.

tangowhsky
12-29-2018, 11:19 AM
...you are on the home stretch man to a guaranteed pension and healthcare for life and no reason to play the game.

Stick it out.

I'm seeing it this way more and more. I suppose i've been working off of the ole 5 stages of grief about the passed over bit...just hard when we all know we have earned it, and barely miss the cutoff.

Excargodog
12-29-2018, 07:51 PM
I'm seeing it this way more and more. I suppose i've been working off of the ole 5 stages of grief about the passed over bit...just hard when we all know we have earned it, and barely miss the cutoff.

I knew a number of good people who got passed over for O-5 (and a few real whisky deltas that somehow made o-6 and O-7). It's a fallible system. Put the hurt behind you and do what makes the most sense. But the numbers are pretty close no matter which way you jump:

https://militarypay.defense.gov/calculators/active-duty-retirement/final-pay-calculator/

The advantage to finding a way to stay to twenty is both the healthcare and the certainty that the pension will be there, even if you become medically disqualified tomorrow. That's not a clincher necessarily but it is a factor to consider.

And three more years, by the time you count terminal leave and everything, heck you could be interviewing in a little under two and a half years.

Hacker15e
12-30-2018, 01:57 AM
Going to the airlines 3 years early at the 17 year mark will earn you approximately $750k-$1.05mil for the last three years of your airline career depending on if you retire as a Narrow Body Captain or Widebody Captain.

Waiting three years and collecting O-4 (ret) pay will earn you approximately $969k-1.11mil between retirement and age 65 (depending on if you’re retiring at 42 or 45yrs old).

All it takes is a single merger, a single recession, a single furlough, a single bankruptcy, to completely erase the "3 years early" financial benefit.

And, of course, we know that during the course of a 20+ year airline career there's no chance of any of that happening, right?

On the other hand, short of a massive government meltdown (in which case all bets are off anyway), that mil retirement check is going to be hitting your bank account for life.

Staying to 20 and getting both the pension and the medical benefits are a far more secure bet at the 17 year point.

RckyMtHigh
12-30-2018, 04:20 AM
Benefits of a mil pension from what Iíve seen.

You donít have to work as hard as the next guy. Fly your min line, drop stuff or trade down when you want, and not worry about the hit to your paycheck. My retirement gets me a couple extra days off a month and a 20 hour layover in San Diego instead of 12 hours in Detroit.

Health insurance costs. At SWA anyway, between the company provided free plan and free tricare, we have zero health insurance costs for a family of four. Probably several thousand dollar a year benefit.

Security. My dad got out of the Navy with 15 years in to go with one of the top US carriers at the time. 15 years later, Eastern went bankrupt. Even if you survive a downturn with a job, concessionary contracts are a real thing in this business and years of a real financial hit certainly a possibility. With mil retirement, we wonít be living large, but weíll keep everyone housed, fed, and seeing the doctor if everything goes south.

Merle Dixon
12-30-2018, 10:51 AM
Historical CW would be stay for 20 (and I've told people that in no uncertain terms in years past). However...

At this exact moment in time (due to airline retirement demographics) that would probably cost you a great deal in terms of seniority and ultimate compensation.

Odds are decent that you could bail now, lock in airline seniority, and then participate in guard/reserves to either qualify for a regular AD retirement, or as a consolation prize the reserve retirement at age 60.

It comes down to risk tolerance and how hard you want to chase the best possible airline deal. Upside is having your cake and eating it too. Downside is risk of economic issues, or worst-case medical issues and possibly ending up unable to fly or participate in the reserves to finish the retirement.

With American and United projected to hire 1,000ish each in 2019. Delta 500+, FedEx 500+, not sure about SWA. My vote is you finding a Guard/Reserve job and bail for the airlines. Seniority is EVERYTHING.

I am a UPT reservist. We have multiple AGR openings at the UPT bases. I personally know 3 guys that bailed AD at the 15 to 17 year mark (one of my Broís bailed at 18 years!) got hired by us as Traditional Part-Time reservists, got airline jobs and within 12 months had AGR jobs - which got them to their 20-year active duty retirement.

From what I have heard AFRC wide and via the Guard too, there are AGR jobs open all over the nation. Any insight from any other AFRC/Guard folks on here?

Get an airline job, part-time Guard/Reserve gig, 6 to 9 months later AGR.

Hank Burley
12-30-2018, 11:30 AM
With American and United projected to hire 1,000ish each in 2019. Delta 500+, FedEx 500+, not sure about SWA. My vote is you finding a Guard/Reserve job and bail for the airlines. Seniority is EVERYTHING.

I am a UPT reservist. We have multiple AGR openings at the UPT bases. I personally know 3 guys that bailed AD at the 15 to 17 year mark (one of my Broís bailed at 18 years!) got hired by us as Traditional Part-Time reservists, got airline jobs and within 12 months had AGR jobs - which got them to their 20-year active duty retirement.

From what I have heard AFRC wide and via the Guard too, there are AGR jobs open all over the nation. Any insight from any other AFRC/Guard folks on here?

Get an airline job, part-time Guard/Reserve gig, 6 to 9 months later AGR.

If you can stand AMC for a few years, TACC at Scott will take almost any warm body for at least 3 years and more on title 10 orders if you are willing. Several airline guys work there.

OldSkool
12-30-2018, 11:49 AM
If you can stand AMC for a few years, TACC at Scott will take almost any warm body for at least 3 years and more on title 10 orders if you are willing. Several airline guys work there.

Are these orders USERRA exempt?

hindsight2020
12-30-2018, 12:05 PM
Are these orders USERRA exempt?

Probably not. You gotta go nonner it up the Stans, shiny penny school, or formal training course for those.

Hank Burley
12-30-2018, 01:00 PM
Are these orders USERRA exempt?

Not anymore.

rickair7777
12-30-2018, 01:25 PM
Are these orders USERRA exempt?

Doesn't matter if you only need three years.

PNStoKLIT
12-30-2018, 04:11 PM
Are these orders USERRA exempt?

Some title 10 orders are exempt. The 5 year USERRA protections are exempt from being used by any of the following:


(1) that is required, beyond five years, to complete an initial period of obligated service;

(2) during which such person was unable to obtain orders releasing such person from a period of service in the uniformed services before the expiration of such five-year period and such inability was through no fault of such person;

(3) performed as required pursuant to section 10147 of title 10, under section 502(a) or 503 of title 32, or to fulfill additional training requirements determined and certified in writing by the Secretary concerned, to be necessary for professional development, or for completion of skill training or retraining; or

(4) performed by a member of a uniformed service who is--

(A) ordered to or retained on active duty under section 688, 12301(a), 12301(g), 12302, 12304, or 12305 of title 10 or under section 331, 332, 359, 360, 367, or 712 of title 14;

(B) ordered to or retained on active duty (other than for training) under any provision of law because of a war or national emergency declared by the President or the Congress. as determined by the Secretary concerned;

(C) ordered to active duty (other than for training) in support, as determined by the Secretary concerned, of an operational mission for which personnel have been ordered to active duty under section 12304 of title 10;

(D) ordered to active duty in support, as determined by the Secretary concerned, of a critical mission or requirement of the uniformed services; or

(E) called into Federal service as a member of the National Guard under chapter 15 of title 10 or under section 12406 of title 10.


Good luck getting those orders cut though!

LuckyNo70
12-31-2018, 02:06 AM
The AF is 2000 pilots short, AFRC manning is at 60% retirement eligible, not sure about the Guard. The manning model simply cannot escape the bath tub created years ago with the demand for pilots.

Find a unit, join them, enjoy the new experience. You will be able to find orders to secure the 20 year retirement fairly easy in this environment, and, most likely get promoted in the process. AMC is full of passed over Majors that are now Lt Cols well on their way to an active duty retirement and increasing their seniority at a major airline. Many do it part time and keep both employers happy, it can be done, all depends on your ability to set it up. Remember, if you are at 17 years now, you will most definitely make Lt Col which makes your HYT 28 years. That is 11 years to get three years of orders or 7 if you somehow do not get promoted in the Reserves or Guard. And extensions are being handed out now at even prime units due to the 60% retirement eligible in AFRC mentioned earlier.

Either way you have great options, PM me if you want a more in depth look at current opportunities.

Sorry for the butt hurt of non promotion, it sucks, I saw it many times in active units with folks that have amazing records. However, the manning model says only this many Lt Cols and passover happens. You can determine your next move, it is not dictated by a promotion board.

Good luck and Happy New Year!

hvydvr
01-04-2019, 12:02 PM
Dude, stay in and min run that ****. Fly, make a difference by helping the USAF be better but don't give 2 f-cks's about the qweep and BS unless it adds to the mission, saves a life or helps someone in genuine need.

I'd be a the gym each day, out of the office by 1630 or earlier, chaffing off BS, using leave whenever I please and voicing my real opinion without fear of repercussion.

Other than the few bucks you are missing on O-5 pay, you are on the home stretch man to a guaranteed pension and healthcare for life and no reason to play the game.

Stick it out.

This. Retired AD here as well.

Couple of things I didn't realize that are pretty massive right now. TRICARE is the biggest benefit out there bar none. When I hear some of the healthcare cost stories from others, I realize what a huge bullet that's been dodged by having that.

Major or Lt Col retirement money means you don't have to run around doing stupid sh!t on year 1 trying to make a mortgage. Having that pension made life a lot easier that first year.

Have I missed out on some things because I was a couple of years late to the party? You bet, but for me having those other things for the rest of my life make up for it IMO.

Good Luck.

decrabbitz
01-07-2019, 01:59 AM
Couple of things I didn't realize that are pretty massive right now. TRICARE is the biggest benefit out there bar none


Iím not sure. The biggest benefit to me has been the ability to pass on the GI Bill to my child. Saving me $50,000 a year, so a $200,000 benefit. Not sure Tricare beats that...

Sputnik
01-07-2019, 04:22 AM
Couple of things I didn't realize that are pretty massive right now. TRICARE is the biggest benefit out there bar none


Iím not sure. The biggest benefit to me has been the ability to pass on the GI Bill to my child. Saving me $50,000 a year, so a $200,000 benefit. Not sure Tricare beats that...

Over the course of retired life it might be close. Insurance at DL aint cheap and there is a lot of co pays I aint paying.

Splitting hairs here, retirement nets you Tricare. Certain number of years and signing paperwork gets GI Bill transfer--retirement not all all necessary.

Certainly a fantastic benefit

hvydvr
01-07-2019, 09:24 AM
Couple of things I didn't realize that are pretty massive right now. TRICARE is the biggest benefit out there bar none


Iím not sure. The biggest benefit to me has been the ability to pass on the GI Bill to my child. Saving me $50,000 a year, so a $200,000 benefit. Not sure Tricare beats that...

Wife was in a huge accident 2 yrs after retirement. Four surgeries and two hospital stays. Hospitals charged over $100,000. I had $250 left on the $3000 cap and thatís what I paid. Over a 40 yr retirement, it wonít even be close.

PRS Guitars
01-07-2019, 02:41 PM
Couple of things I didn't realize that are pretty massive right now. TRICARE is the biggest benefit out there bar none


I’m not sure. The biggest benefit to me has been the ability to pass on the GI Bill to my child. Saving me $50,000 a year, so a $200,000 benefit. Not sure Tricare beats that...

Sorry to tell you, you don’t have to retire to pass on the GI bill. I passed on 100% and am a reservist.

135tankerdriver
01-18-2019, 09:32 PM
Without the spousal support for the large pay cut for the first year, itís going to be stressful without that pension supplement to your income, no matter where you end up, especially if youíre a commuter or a single income household.

Going to the airlines 3 years early at the 17 year mark will earn you approximately $750k-$1.05mil for the last three years of your airline career depending on if you retire as a Narrow Body Captain or Widebody Captain.

Waiting three years and collecting O-4 (ret) pay will earn you approximately $969k-1.11mil between retirement and age 65 (depending on if youíre retiring at 42 or 45yrs old).

Math checks out that youíre probably financially better off staying in and going for the pension at that point. Live longer than age 65 and you earn far more by staying for 20 over your life time.

If he gets out at 17 and does three good years heíd get a reserve retirement that starts at age 60. It appears you did not factor that in your calculations. If not could someone chime in on about how much that would be. Thanks.

rickair7777
01-19-2019, 05:24 AM
If he gets out at 17 and does three good years he’d get a reserve retirement that starts at age 60. It appears you did not factor that in your calculations. If not could someone chime in on about how much that would be. Thanks.

With 17 years AD and a few reserve years to seal the deal, at age 60 (earlier if he does any OCO deployments in the reserves) that would amount to almost the same regular AD he would have got at 20 (that 17 years is a HUGE weighting factor, he gets full credit for that). He could actually beat the regular AD value if he makes O5 (probably will) and stays longer than 20 (more points x higher paygrade value).

On and On
01-25-2019, 12:25 AM
With 17 years AD and a few reserve years to seal the deal, at age 60 (earlier if he does any OCO deployments in the reserves) that would amount to almost the same regular AD he would have got at 20 (that 17 years is a HUGE weighting factor, he gets full credit for that). He could actually beat the regular AD value if he makes O5 (probably will) and stays longer than 20 (more points x higher paygrade value).

Reserves are the way to go IMHO. You can utilize Tricare Reserve Select for your family and I think it is about $220 a month. In AETC specifically, mandays are at a premium! Yes it's a grind, but until you hire on with an airline you can still get paid and earn points until retirement. We have had guys at their 19 year point jump to the Reserves, crank out the 365 they needed for a full AD retirement at their own pace while applying to the airlines. You can't chaff off Big Blue and hit the gym for 2 hours a day and bail at 1630. They simply dig their claws in and will not let you go this route. I say find a Reserve flying gig you want, where you want and jump from AD.

C17B74
02-12-2019, 04:19 PM
Awesome advice throughout these posts. Get Both!!! My 2 cents having paralleled your situation for the most part. Everything is situation dependent and timing is everything in my case. Find that Guard/Reserve unit (Location, Deploy/non deploy, AGR vacancies, Lt Col slots), get that airline of choice and get acclimated with your new environment. Juggle your schedule with the airline and order sets (deployments or home station alerts, whatever) to accumulate those 3 years, or do the AGR gig, or AMC/TACC, AFRC HQ, Guard Bureau (ANGRC), etc. USERRA exempt wonít apply with 3 years remaining. Guys bring it up because they may have nearly exhausted their 5 years with their employer and USERRA exempt orders could bring them across the finish line which I fully understand. I myself (Lord willing) patched together 4 of the 5 aforementioned orders/job titles to get the check of the month club/TRICARE/line number. Donít forget to consider your VA disability benefits if applicable and pass your GI benefits as others have mentioned. 4 years remaining to be eligible I believe and every solid year (365 points) after 20 AD years is 2.5% more of your base pay which should be considered. These benefits have dropped the pressure of possible unforeseen furloughs, stagnant upgrades/economy, health risks ending ones career overnight, family coverage, seniority benefits, etc. It was a huge decision and a big jump no doubt, but at least the ball is in your court for the most part. Good Luck and Godspeed!



Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1