Airline Pilot Forums

Airline Pilot Forums was designed to be a community where working airline pilots can share ideas and information about the aviation field. In the forum you will find information about major and regional airline carriers, career training, interview and job seeker help, finance, and living the airline pilot lifestyle.




View Full Version : Psych Eval


Skyrider12
12-30-2018, 04:05 PM
Hey guys!
I am a new pilot and new poster here and recently posted a couple threads about some issues from my past that may effect my medical. I got some great answers and feedback and now know what i have to do to get my medical, but have a couple questions.
Basically i consulted with an AMAS doctor per the advice of fellow pilots on this forum and got some bad news.
I will have to get a psych eval done and go through the HIMS process to get my medical back.
My situation is as follows: Im 25 with a PPL and hope to fly commercially, and also hold a first class medical. About 6 years ago i was arrested for being drunk in public, and had adderall on me.
I was also ticketed for marijuana possesion the following year.
I beat the rap and have no convictions and didnt report it per the advice of an AOPA attorney.
Last year i consulted with two more attorneys who both said id have to report it. So i asked around here and was referred to an AMAS flight surgeon who basically said unequivocally yes, report it, and go through HIMS.

So i understand the issues ive brought upon myself, and that this is a huge process and takes a long time. Also i undsertand my prospects of getting hired are significantly....lowered. But i still love aviation and want to fly. I am a "perfect citizen" now and dont speed / jaywalk etc kind of guy and I plan on keeping it that way.
So basically, does anyone know what the psych eval actually is? I know there are a battery of cognitive/IQ tests, but.....has anyone here actually taken them? Any advice on things to prepare for? I looked them up and it looks like ill be practicing my math skills for sure! Most seem *sorta* straight forward but the thought of my future riding on an IQ test is scary...
Sorry for the long post and a huge thanks to you all for your help and advice.
Thanks again,
Skyrider


2992set
12-30-2018, 04:30 PM
its an expensive process..2800 i paid for the cog screen..long two days ahead of u for that. nothing really to do to prep, I heard luminosity helps.

Skyrider12
12-30-2018, 04:35 PM
Thanks for the reply! Was there a lot of math involved? Is there like a certain IQ you need to pass? Im not *too* concerned but want to be as prepared as possible.


Excargodog
12-30-2018, 06:09 PM
What must the psychiatric evaluation report include? At a minimum:
A review of all available records, including academic records, records of prior psychiatric hospitalizations, and records of periods of observation or treatment (e.g., psychiatrist, psychologist, social worker, counselor, or neuropsychologist treatment notes). Records must be in sufficient detail to permit a clear evaluation of the nature and extent of any previous mental disorders.
A thorough clinical interview to include a detailed history regarding: psychosocial or developmental problems; academic and employment performance; legal issues; substance use/abuse (including treatment and quality of recovery); aviation background and experience; medical conditions, and all medication use; and behavioral observations during the interview.
A mental status examination.
An integrated summary of findings with an explicit diagnostic statement, and the psychiatrist's opinion(s) and recommendation(s) for treatment, medication, therapy, counseling, rehabilitation, or monitoring should be explicitly stated. Opinions regarding clinically or aeromedically significant findings and the potential impact on aviation safety must be consistent with the Federal Aviation Regulations.
What must be submitted by the psychiatrist? The psychiatrist's comprehensive and detailed report, as noted above, plus copies of supporting documentation. Recommendations should be strictly limited to the psychiatrist's area of expertise. Psychiatrists with questions are encouraged to call Charles Chesanow, D.O., FAA Chief Psychiatrist, at (202) 267-3767.
THE NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL EVALUATION
Who may perform a neuropsychological evaluation? Neuropsychological evaluations must be conducted by a neuropsychologist who is included on the provider list, accessed through the following link: See FAA Neuropsychologist List (PDF).
What must the neuropsychological evaluation report include? At a minimum:
A review of all available records, including academic records, records of prior psychiatric hospitalizations, and records of periods of observation or treatment (e.g., psychiatrist, psychologist, or pediatric neuropsychiatrist treatment notes). Records must be in sufficient detail to permit a clear evaluation of the nature and extent of any previous mental disorders.
A thorough clinical interview to include a detailed history regarding: psychosocial or developmental problems; academic and employment performance; legal issues; substance use/abuse (including treatment and quality of recovery); aviation background and experience; medical conditions, and all medication use; and behavioral observations during the interview and testing.
A mental status examination.
Interpretation of a full battery of neuropsychological and psychological tests including but not limited to the core test battery (specified below).
An integrated summary of findings with an explicit diagnostic statement, and the neuropsychologist's opinion(s) and recommendation(s) regarding clinically or aeromedically significant findings and the potential impact on aviation safety consistent with the Federal Aviation Regulations.
What is required in the core test battery? The core test battery listed below provides a standardized basis for the FAA's review of cases, and must include:
CogScreen-Aeromedical Edition (CogScreen-AE)
The complete Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales (Processing Speed and Working Memory Indexes must be scored)
Trail Making Test, Parts A and B (Reitan Trails A & B should be used since aviation norms are available for the original Reitan Trails A & B, but not for similar tests [e.g., Color Trails; Trails from Kaplan-Delis Executive Function, etc.])
Executive function tests to include:
Category Test or Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and
Stroop Color-Word Test
Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT)
A continuous performance test (i.e., Test of Variables of Attention [TOVA], or Conners' Continuous Performance Test [CPT-II], or Integrated Visual and Auditory Continuous Performance Test [IVA+]), or Gordon Diagnostic System [GDS].
Test of verbal memory (WMS-IV subtests, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, or California Verbal Learning Test-II)
Test of visual memory (WMS-IV subtests, Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised, or Rey Complex Figure Test)
Tests of Language including Boston Naming Test and Verbal Fluency (COWAT and a semantic fluency task)
Psychomotor testing including Finger Tapping and Grooved Pegboard or Purdue Pegboard
Personality testing, to include the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2)
(The MMPI-2-RF is not an approved substitute. All scales, subscales, content, and supplementary scales must be scored and provided. Computer scoring is required. Abbreviated administrations are not acceptable.)
NOTES: (1) All tests administered must be the most current edition of the test unless specified otherwise; (2) At the discretion of the examiner, additional tests may be clinically necessary to assure a complete assessment.
What must be submitted? The neuropsychologist's report as noted above, plus the supporting documentation below:
Copies of all computer score reports (e.g., CogScreen-AE score report, Pearson MMPI-2 Extended Score Report, TOVA, CPT-II or IVA+ Report).
An appended score summary sheet that includes all scores for all tests administered. When available, pilot norms must be used. If pilot norms are not available for a particular test, then the normative comparison group (e.g., general population, age/education-corrected) must be specified. Also, when available, percentile scores must be included.
Recommendations should be strictly limited to the psychologist's area of expertise. Psychologists with questions are encouraged to call Chris Front, Psy.D, FAA Psychologist, at (202) 267-3767.
What else does the psychologist need to know?
The FAA will not proceed with a review of the test findings without the above data.

https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/avs/offices/aam/ame/guide/media/FAA_Certification_Aid_DA_Initial.pdf

https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/avs/offices/aam/ame/guide/media/HIMS_DA_Monitoring_Initial_Certification.pdf

https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/avs/offices/aam/ame/guide/dec_cons/disease_prot/saspec/

Skyrider12
12-30-2018, 06:38 PM
What must the psychiatric evaluation report include? At a minimum:
A review of all available records, including academic records, records of prior psychiatric hospitalizations, and records of periods of observation or treatment (e.g., psychiatrist, psychologist, social worker, counselor, or neuropsychologist treatment notes). Records must be in sufficient detail to permit a clear evaluation of the nature and extent of any previous mental disorders.
A thorough clinical interview to include a detailed history regarding: psychosocial or developmental problems; academic and employment performance; legal issues; substance use/abuse (including treatment and quality of recovery); aviation background and experience; medical conditions, and all medication use; and behavioral observations during the interview.
A mental status examination.
An integrated summary of findings with an explicit diagnostic statement, and the psychiatrist's opinion(s) and recommendation(s) for treatment, medication, therapy, counseling, rehabilitation, or monitoring should be explicitly stated. Opinions regarding clinically or aeromedically significant findings and the potential impact on aviation safety must be consistent with the Federal Aviation Regulations.
What must be submitted by the psychiatrist? The psychiatrist's comprehensive and detailed report, as noted above, plus copies of supporting documentation. Recommendations should be strictly limited to the psychiatrist's area of expertise. Psychiatrists with questions are encouraged to call Charles Chesanow, D.O., FAA Chief Psychiatrist, at (202) 267-3767.
THE NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL EVALUATION
Who may perform a neuropsychological evaluation? Neuropsychological evaluations must be conducted by a neuropsychologist who is included on the provider list, accessed through the following link: See FAA Neuropsychologist List (PDF).
What must the neuropsychological evaluation report include? At a minimum:
A review of all available records, including academic records, records of prior psychiatric hospitalizations, and records of periods of observation or treatment (e.g., psychiatrist, psychologist, or pediatric neuropsychiatrist treatment notes). Records must be in sufficient detail to permit a clear evaluation of the nature and extent of any previous mental disorders.
A thorough clinical interview to include a detailed history regarding: psychosocial or developmental problems; academic and employment performance; legal issues; substance use/abuse (including treatment and quality of recovery); aviation background and experience; medical conditions, and all medication use; and behavioral observations during the interview and testing.
A mental status examination.
Interpretation of a full battery of neuropsychological and psychological tests including but not limited to the core test battery (specified below).
An integrated summary of findings with an explicit diagnostic statement, and the neuropsychologist's opinion(s) and recommendation(s) regarding clinically or aeromedically significant findings and the potential impact on aviation safety consistent with the Federal Aviation Regulations.
What is required in the core test battery? The core test battery listed below provides a standardized basis for the FAA's review of cases, and must include:
CogScreen-Aeromedical Edition (CogScreen-AE)
The complete Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales (Processing Speed and Working Memory Indexes must be scored)
Trail Making Test, Parts A and B (Reitan Trails A & B should be used since aviation norms are available for the original Reitan Trails A & B, but not for similar tests [e.g., Color Trails; Trails from Kaplan-Delis Executive Function, etc.])
Executive function tests to include:
Category Test or Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and
Stroop Color-Word Test
Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT)
A continuous performance test (i.e., Test of Variables of Attention [TOVA], or Conners' Continuous Performance Test [CPT-II], or Integrated Visual and Auditory Continuous Performance Test [IVA+]), or Gordon Diagnostic System [GDS].
Test of verbal memory (WMS-IV subtests, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, or California Verbal Learning Test-II)
Test of visual memory (WMS-IV subtests, Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised, or Rey Complex Figure Test)
Tests of Language including Boston Naming Test and Verbal Fluency (COWAT and a semantic fluency task)
Psychomotor testing including Finger Tapping and Grooved Pegboard or Purdue Pegboard
Personality testing, to include the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2)
(The MMPI-2-RF is not an approved substitute. All scales, subscales, content, and supplementary scales must be scored and provided. Computer scoring is required. Abbreviated administrations are not acceptable.)
NOTES: (1) All tests administered must be the most current edition of the test unless specified otherwise; (2) At the discretion of the examiner, additional tests may be clinically necessary to assure a complete assessment.
What must be submitted? The neuropsychologist's report as noted above, plus the supporting documentation below:
Copies of all computer score reports (e.g., CogScreen-AE score report, Pearson MMPI-2 Extended Score Report, TOVA, CPT-II or IVA+ Report).
An appended score summary sheet that includes all scores for all tests administered. When available, pilot norms must be used. If pilot norms are not available for a particular test, then the normative comparison group (e.g., general population, age/education-corrected) must be specified. Also, when available, percentile scores must be included.
Recommendations should be strictly limited to the psychologist's area of expertise. Psychologists with questions are encouraged to call Chris Front, Psy.D, FAA Psychologist, at (202) 267-3767.
What else does the psychologist need to know?
The FAA will not proceed with a review of the test findings without the above data.

https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/avs/offices/aam/ame/guide/media/FAA_Certification_Aid_DA_Initial.pdf

https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/avs/offices/aam/ame/guide/media/HIMS_DA_Monitoring_Initial_Certification.pdf

https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/avs/offices/aam/ame/guide/dec_cons/disease_prot/saspec/




Thanks for the info!!
Well....i sure better get on luminosity ASAP!
Thanks so much you guys.

georgiaflyer
01-06-2019, 06:09 PM
I paid $3400 for my cog screen. Get plenty of rest. Itís a brutal two days.

V1rotateV2
01-14-2019, 04:00 AM
Did the full initial evaluation in 2017, including CogScreen...$800, done in a few hours, relaxing environment and the computer part of it was actually enjoyable.

KA350Driver
01-22-2019, 06:51 PM
Hey guys!
I am a new pilot and new poster here and recently posted a couple threads about some issues from my past that may effect my medical. I got some great answers and feedback and now know what i have to do to get my medical, but have a couple questions.
Basically i consulted with an AMAS doctor per the advice of fellow pilots on this forum and got some bad news.
I will have to get a psych eval done and go through the HIMS process to get my medical back.
My situation is as follows: Im 25 with a PPL and hope to fly commercially, and also hold a first class medical. About 6 years ago i was arrested for being drunk in public, and had adderall on me.
I was also ticketed for marijuana possesion the following year.
I beat the rap and have no convictions and didnt report it per the advice of an AOPA attorney.
Last year i consulted with two more attorneys who both said id have to report it. So i asked around here and was referred to an AMAS flight surgeon who basically said unequivocally yes, report it, and go through HIMS.

So i understand the issues ive brought upon myself, and that this is a huge process and takes a long time. Also i undsertand my prospects of getting hired are significantly....lowered. But i still love aviation and want to fly. I am a "perfect citizen" now and dont speed / jaywalk etc kind of guy and I plan on keeping it that way.
So basically, does anyone know what the psych eval actually is? I know there are a battery of cognitive/IQ tests, but.....has anyone here actually taken them? Any advice on things to prepare for? I looked them up and it looks like ill be practicing my math skills for sure! Most seem *sorta* straight forward but the thought of my future riding on an IQ test is scary...
Sorry for the long post and a huge thanks to you all for your help and advice.
Thanks again,
Skyrider


Do some luminosity. Itíll help with about half the test. Gets your brain used to working a bit faster. The rest of it, well, just donít be a complete idiot and youíll be fine. Hell, I am a complete idiot and I managed to pass. If you have the congnitive ability to log onto APC and string together sentences that make at least a little bit of sense you can pass the Cog test.

av8n
05-17-2019, 04:28 AM
Did the full initial evaluation in 2017, including CogScreen...$800, done in a few hours, relaxing environment and the computer part of it was actually enjoyable.

I DO NOT want anyone to think this is the ďtestĒ. You can do it all at once in about 8-9 hours or in a two day period.