Airline Pilot Forums

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LowerLoon185
07-21-2019, 04:05 PM
Hello,

This came up in another thread, but didnít want to derail.

Iíll have all my ratings this fall and about 1050 hours. Iím looking to go straight to a regional as soon as I can, but need those last ~450 hours. Couple of things to consider; I have a great paying job that allows me to sock away money every month, have good insurance, etc. I also own my own plane.

I think the conventional thinking is get a 135 job to cover the hours, but only needing 450 or so poses a problem. I could do pipeline or instruct as well. Issue is those would require quitting my job to do it properly and get the time.

Does it sound crazy to just keep my current job and fly my own plane for the last 400 or so till Iím ready to apply? I know itís a lot of money, but keeping my job allows me to pay for it and still save money. The airplane is a ďforever airplaneĒ, so itís here to stay....Iím paying for it anyway. Lastly, will the regionals look at me funny for having the last 450 in a Cessna?

Thanks in advance.


Positiveg
07-21-2019, 05:57 PM
Trans States will front you up to $40k of your bonus for time building if you sign a two year contract with them. Anything you donít use is given to you as part of the normal bonus schedule. You can use pretty much any local flight school. I negotiated a block rate with a local school and flew a couple hundred hours using bonus money.

galaxy flyer
07-21-2019, 06:53 PM
Hello,

This came up in another thread, but didnít want to derail.

Iíll have all my ratings this fall and about 1050 hours. Iím looking to go straight to a regional as soon as I can, but need those last ~450 hours. Couple of things to consider; I have a great paying job that allows me to sock away money every month, have good insurance, etc. I also own my own plane.

I think the conventional thinking is get a 135 job to cover the hours, but only needing 450 or so poses a problem. I could do pipeline or instruct as well. Issue is those would require quitting my job to do it properly and get the time.

Does it sound crazy to just keep my current job and fly my own plane for the last 400 or so till Iím ready to apply? I know itís a lot of money, but keeping my job allows me to pay for it and still save money. The airplane is a ďforever airplaneĒ, so itís here to stay....Iím paying for it anyway. Lastly, will the regionals look at me funny for having the last 450 in a Cessna?

Thanks in advance.

Get a job flying airplanes, adds credibility to your resume and will make the transition at a regional much easier. Flying as a job and logging hours in your own plane not answering to a chief pilot are very different things.

GF


LowerLoon185
07-22-2019, 07:44 AM
Trans States will front you up to $40k of your bonus for time building if you sign a two year contract with them.

Thank you for the heads up, i had no idea. Honestly, i hadn't looked at TSA because of range of domaciles...but Denver would be do-able. I'm willing to relocate for the right job.

LowerLoon185
07-22-2019, 07:48 AM
Get a job flying airplanes, adds credibility to your resume and will make the transition at a regional much easier. Flying as a job and logging hours in your own plane not answering to a chief pilot are very different things.

GF

Thank for the response, this is what i was worried about. I know getting a job flying 135 for the last portion of hours would be highly preferrable; i'm just concerned if anyone would want a guy for ~6 months or i'd have to sign a long training contract when really my goal is to get to a Regional ASAP. To that point, i've been looking at Ameriflight.

So, all agreeing that flying employment is better......would filling the rest with GA time be a negative or hurt my chances for getting on with a regional? If that's the case, i'm biting the bullet and i'll plan on putting in at least a year at a 135.

sourdough44
08-01-2019, 05:27 AM
I agree, a few extra hours in your own plane is one thing, but 450?

Iíd try to get a Ďrealí flying job.

Rhoads287
08-01-2019, 08:09 AM
If you end up just flying your own plane for the last 400 or so hours, make sure they are productive hours. Donít just do the usual 100 dollar cheeseburger cross country. I would recommend spending lots of time shooting approaches under the hood, and sharpening other skills that will come in use during your regional training. If I remember correctly, during my regional training there were 3 or so guys that had gotten there by just owning their own airplanes. Not of them made it through, I suspect because a lot of their time was just joyriding. Just make sure your instrument skills and procedures are up to snuff.

LowerLoon185
08-01-2019, 12:55 PM
I agree, a few extra hours in your own plane is one thing, but 450?

Iíd try to get a Ďrealí flying job.

Yep, that's what i'm leaning toward. Main reason I thought of it was i'm already paying for the plane..and my current job pays way more than a time builder job to get to 1500. Plus, there's part of me that doesn't want to get that interim job just to bail on an employer...doesn't seem right, but i know this industry is different. I took a second look at my schedule, and it's more than likely ~350 or so that i'd need. Still sounds like too much.

Thank you for the response.

LowerLoon185
08-01-2019, 01:01 PM
If I remember correctly, during my regional training there were 3 or so guys that had gotten there by just owning their own airplanes. Not of them made it through, I suspect because a lot of their time was just joyriding. Just make sure your instrument skills and procedures are up to snuff.

Thank you. I've obviously never been in a 121 training program, but i'm assuming it's challenging. Even more challenging if you've not been honing your skills. Recently been looking hard at Ameriflight. Looks like i could potentially qualify for the Be99 CA job at 1200 hours and be in the domicile i want. Again, new to this, but hand flying two PT6's single pilot for a year or two gaining TPIC would be infinitely more useful. I would think that might even get me a leg up when i eventually go to a regional, but who knows.

rickair7777
08-01-2019, 01:08 PM
Thank you. I've obviously never been in a 121 training program, but i'm assuming it's challenging. Even more challenging if you've not been honing your skills. Recently been looking hard at Ameriflight. Looks like i could potentially qualify for the Be99 CA job at 1200 hours and be in the domicile i want. Again, new to this, but hand flying two PT6's single pilot for a year or two gaining TPIC would be infinitely more useful. I would think that might even get me a leg up when i eventually go to a regional, but who knows.

It would give you a leg up in 121 training (compared to PPL or ASEL GA ops), but probably won't help you much to get hired, they are pretty much hiring all-comers, although the additional experience might get you an earlier class date.

dera
08-01-2019, 10:31 PM
It would give you a leg up in 121 training (compared to PPL or ASEL GA ops), but probably won't help you much to get hired, they are pretty much hiring all-comers, although the additional experience might get you an earlier class date.

It might give you a training failure though, which would turn most desirable regionals into no-go's.

TiredSoul
08-01-2019, 11:45 PM
When I flew 135 I did 980hrs in two years.
Youíre looking at at least a year for 450hrs or not far from it.
Most employers like a year commitment so thatís a match.
Itís not like itís useless time, any 135 flying will be much more valuable then anything you can do on your own in a SE.
Have a look at this place for instance:
https://www.aceaircargo.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Hiring-bonus.pdf
If you work there for a year youíll have a ton of real world flying experience to bring with you to a regional.
You really think being over 1500 when you apply will hurt you in some way?
Get some ďrealĒ world time, it will be of great benefit to you.
Ton of options right now.

TheRaven
08-03-2019, 07:13 AM
ďThose last few hoursĒ does not accurately describe the 450 hrs between 1050 and 1500.....

DontLookDown
08-03-2019, 12:24 PM
ďThose last few hoursĒ does not accurately describe the 450 hrs between 1050 and 1500.....

Kinda what I was thinking. Being 2/3 of the way there is close enough to almost see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the last 1/3 is still a significant amount of time

LowerLoon185
08-07-2019, 06:17 AM
It might give you a training failure though, which would turn most desirable regionals into no-go's.

Dera, thanks for the response. Can you elaborate, this is definitely something that i'm wary of.

LowerLoon185
08-07-2019, 06:23 AM
When I flew 135 I did 980hrs in two years.
Youíre looking at at least a year for 450hrs or not far from it.
Most employers like a year commitment so thatís a match.
Itís not like itís useless time, any 135 flying will be much more valuable then anything you can do on your own in a SE.
Have a look at this place for instance:
https://www.aceaircargo.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Hiring-bonus.pdf
If you work there for a year youíll have a ton of real world flying experience to bring with you to a regional.
You really think being over 1500 when you apply will hurt you in some way?
Get some ďrealĒ world time, it will be of great benefit to you.
Ton of options right now.

Sounds good, I'm new to this so wasn't sure if "only one year" would be seen negatively by a future employer. It is in many other industries. I definitely don't think that being over 1500 will hurt, really just being mindful of all the focus on seniority number. Everything I've read and heard seems to emphasize "get on with a regional ASAP and get a number." Just don't want to miss the boat.

Outside of the flying part of my resume, my friends tell me i'm a good candidate to be competitive to go pretty much anywhere. I just don't want to screw up or delay this first, critical step.

Thanks again

LowerLoon185
08-07-2019, 06:35 AM
Kinda what I was thinking. Being 2/3 of the way there is close enough to almost see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the last 1/3 is still a significant amount of time

Absolutely see what you are saying (as well as Raven above). Light at the end of the tunnel. Or as a buddy of mine said, 90% there, 90% to go.:D

rickair7777
08-07-2019, 07:04 AM
It might give you a training failure though, which would turn most desirable regionals into no-go's.

That's true also.

For that reason I recommend researching the training provided by any potential employer... some are quite bad, and simply hire 15 when they need 10 pilots (or 7 pilots). This is less common today in 121 (simply due to pilot shortage) but it's still out there in a few dark corners.

Also I would avoid collecting recreational or vanity ratings until you reach your career destination airline. That ASES ATP rating might be cool but it has no career upside and plenty of downside if you happen to bust for some reason.

If the seaplane DPE is your uncle or something, then sure go for it.

HotDogSonicBoom
08-09-2019, 01:11 PM
When I flew 135 I did 980hrs in two years.
Youíre looking at at least a year for 450hrs or not far from it.
Most employers like a year commitment so thatís a match.
Itís not like itís useless time, any 135 flying will be much more valuable then anything you can do on your own in a SE.
Have a look at this place for instance:
https://www.aceaircargo.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Hiring-bonus.pdf
If you work there for a year youíll have a ton of real world flying experience to bring with you to a regional.
You really think being over 1500 when you apply will hurt you in some way?
Get some ďrealĒ world time, it will be of great benefit to you.
Ton of options right now.

As a current ACE pilot, you probably wonít get in. To come in as an FO you need to be blessed from within by an active employee pilot, plus you need Alaska time and connections. They will fly you a lot (Iíve blocked 40.4 hours in the past 7 days) and make you a sharp IFR pilot, but they also are always pushing **** they shouldnít (SVFR into OVC010 1SM kinda stuff to get mail in). Great people and great place, but with no union itís easy to get sniped by management when someone else screws up but makes the company more money.

Now if you have your ATP thereís a bonus, and a B1900C type means youíre in the next class.