Airline Pilot Forums

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Bryguy
10-08-2019, 06:06 PM
Evening,

I have a CPL with 300TT SEL. I have a few questions if anyone is willing.
(Going to start Sending out Resumes,Hopefully, next Year)

Ive been doing some research though multiple forums and employer websites. It looks like a good portion of jobs are looking for at minimum 400-500TT with a Multi-engine prefered.

I understand that most of the Industry is Governed by Insurance Minimums ETC. How much wiggle room do employers give regarding pilot total Time?


goodridecowboy
10-08-2019, 06:12 PM
Totally depends on the employer and what their insurance is comfortable with. You can typically rely on any multi job (some Aztec LiDAR flying out there) will be around 50ME required. I've seen many jobs that are posted requiring 500 hours, but there's wiggle room. Just apply to everything and be okay with getting some no's. Also, look into Keystone Aerial Surveys when the hiring season for survey picks up again. I'm pretty sure their minimums for the entry level SEL jobs are pretty low.

DrSmacFum
10-08-2019, 07:15 PM
that Commercial multi add on that you're missing, will definitely help you look more attractive.

Aerial Survey is your best bet. Reach out to them all


Bryguy
10-08-2019, 07:36 PM
that Commercial multi add on that you're missing, will definitely help you look more attractive.

Aerial Survey is your best bet. Reach out to them all

I would but..... I ran out of the money :\ and there are not any Local Flight schools for me that teach multi

MadmanX2
10-16-2019, 10:04 AM
Maybe banner towing.

Hard to get started in aviation.

A little easier with CFI, or at least 500+ total time.

Bryguy
10-17-2019, 05:28 PM
Maybe banner towing.

Hard to get started in aviation.

A little easier with CFI, or at least 500+ total time.

But itís possible... thatís all I need.... And I donít want the responsibility of being a CFI personally. Iíd get too many ulcers.

goodridecowboy
10-18-2019, 09:43 AM
But itís possible... thatís all I need.... And I donít want the responsibility of being a CFI personally. Iíd get too many ulcers.

Yeah it can be a really stressful job at times but I guarantee it makes you a better pilot. There's a reason CFI is a preferred qualifications for so many jobs.

TiredSoul
10-18-2019, 09:53 AM
Networking is key.
Get a job working the ramp at an FBO and get to know Private airplane owners.
Some may let you fly their airplane for just gas or taking care of it when theyíre not around.
Anybody offers you a ride in something multi engine or turbine take it just donít log it.
Get your face and your name known as a hard worker.
Former student of mine who had just started his CFI came to tell me he would quit his training as he was offered a job on a multi engine turbine right on the ramp refueling the airplane.
Guy who managed the airplane got talking to him and there he went.
Itís rare but if happens.

Walkman
10-25-2019, 08:06 PM
Yeah it can be a really stressful job at times but I guarantee it makes you a better pilot. There's a reason CFI is a preferred qualifications for so many jobs.


We see CFI as a preferred qualification for a lot of low time jobs, but there may be an employer who believes that there are better or more important qualifications for a potential pilot to have... i.e. Part 135 or crew experience.

TiredSoul
10-26-2019, 10:02 AM
I think flight instruction is probably the best way to prepare you for multi crew operations.

NeverHome
10-26-2019, 03:24 PM
I think flight instruction is probably the best way to prepare you for multi crew operations.

I absolutely agree with this. Sure some days instructing suck, but 100% will make you a better more qualified professional.

And sometimes low time guys (under 1000hours) think they have this whole pilot thing mastered and the stupid regs are keeping guys out of the airline seat. The reality is however that no matter how many hours and years you have there is always more to learn, skills to refine, new perspectives to be obtained, and experiences to be had.

Iím not picking on low time guys, just that Iíve been there. I was one cocky SOB, and years later Iím not so cocky (amazing how we change the older we get). So simply as a low time guy, if nothing else is available go CFI. Trust me, it will be very much worth your while. On one condition however, and this is true of every pilot job you will ever do: you will get out what you put in! Donít get lazy on your students or employers. Your reputation will already be known by prospective employers, even before you apply.

mrmysterioso69
10-26-2019, 10:49 PM
Evening,



I have a CPL with 300TT SEL. I have a few questions if anyone is willing.

(Going to start Sending out Resumes,Hopefully, next Year)



Ive been doing some research though multiple forums and employer websites. It looks like a good portion of jobs are looking for at minimum 400-500TT with a Multi-engine prefered.



I understand that most of the Industry is Governed by Insurance Minimums ETC. How much wiggle room do employers give regarding pilot total Time?My experience is that insurance minimums are usually lower than hiring "minimums". Hiring "minimums" are bull****, this isn't just in aviation either, it's everywhere. Most of the time, minimums are the employer's vision of the perfect candidate, which 9/10 each new hire isn't perfect. Never let not meeting minimums stop you from applying. If a job says 500TT minimum and you only have 280, apply anyway, you'd be surprised.

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk

RabidW0mbat
10-27-2019, 06:14 PM
I got my first job flying at 240tt with a wet CMEL/CSEL. It was survey and I was right place right time. Used that to network into ferrying light pistons all over the US. Then I had enough time to start flying a King Air, then a Citation, then some turbine skydiving, then had the time to jump to a regional. You just have to do the research, find out who flies around you, or be willing to move for the more popular jobs for low timers. Keep a stack of resumes ready, Walk around the local airport / etc. you really never know when opportunity will knock. I remember being at that wet commercial starting point and feeling like the wall was insurmountable, just keep at it.

cfii2007
11-06-2019, 04:28 AM
CFI would be a good route...depends if you enjoy teaching or not.

Aerial survey would be a good option, if you don't mind living on the road for a while. Keystone hires low timers out of Philly.

Pretty tough building your way up to ATP mins, they don't call this period in your career (250-1500TT) the "black hole" for nothing.

The job market is still pretty strong, so there are ALOT of options out there.

Spaniardpilott
12-13-2019, 06:38 PM
Networking is key.
Get a job working the ramp at an FBO and get to know Private airplane owners.
Some may let you fly their airplane for just gas or taking care of it when theyíre not around.
Anybody offers you a ride in something multi engine or turbine take it just donít log it.
Get your face and your name known as a hard worker.
Former student of mine who had just started his CFI came to tell me he would quit his training as he was offered a job on a multi engine turbine right on the ramp refueling the airplane.
Guy who managed the airplane got talking to him and there he went.
Itís rare but if happens.


What airport was that? :D